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IL House Higher Ed Committee Begins SIU Hearings

State lawmakers say hours of testimony Monday on the SIU Carbondale campus will help as the group shapes the future of higher education funding in Illinois.

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Trending Stories

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flickr/ Tony Webster

New Law To Address Police Officers' Mental Health

Illinois police officers who want to seek mental health care can now do so without jeopardizing their jobs.

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Lance Cpl. Damany S. Coleman / Released by the United States Marine Corps [Public Domain]

Fake Weed: The Danger And The Appeal

Education Desk

An elite boarding school in Connecticut is acknowledging sexual abuse by seven now-former staffers against 16 students — going back as far as 1969 and lasting until 1992.

The Hotchkiss School in Lakeville, Conn., is a private high school of about 600 students.

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Statehouse

Anne Burke
Illinois Supreme Court (via uis.edu)

Illinois Supreme Court Justice Anne Burke is calling for a new investigation into sex abuse in the Catholic Church. Church authorities are doing just that, but Burke says the matter cannot be left to the Catholic heirarchy.

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Health+Harvest Desk

Lance Cpl. Damany S. Coleman / Released by the United States Marine Corps [Public Domain]

Once considered the new frontier of drugs and drug trafficking, synthetic cannabinoids have been around for years now and they’re becoming increasingly dangerous. More recently, authorities say dozens of overdoses in Connecticut occurred due to a drug called K-2 that was possibly laced with fentanyl.  

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Arts & Life

There's a sentence at the beginning of Ling Ma's standout debut novel, Severance, that stopped me cold: "When you wake up in a fictitious world," one character tells another, "your only frame of reference is fiction."

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Equity

Catholics around the country are reeling and reflecting after the release of a sweeping grand jury report that implicated 300 priests in the abuse of more than 1000 children in Pennsylvania.

The report contains searing details about minors who were victims of rape, assault, molestation and other abuses. And it articulates how the church’s hierarchy covered it up over decades.

Read the full report here.

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Illinois Economy

Panelists in Alton, Illinois discussed why Illinois residents may be looking to move to bordering states. 

Questions from the audience ranged from recreational cannabis to property taxes. 

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Four years after going out on a limb to get Medicaid expansion enacted in Ohio, outgoing Republican Gov. John Kasich is worried about the future of the program. So he's now defending it – through a study and through the stories of people who have benefited from the coverage expansion.

Republican Sen. Susan Collins says Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh told her he views the landmark abortion rights ruling Roe v. Wade as "settled law."

That assurance, made during a Tuesday morning meeting in the Maine senator's office that lasted more than two hours, likely goes a long way toward securing a key vote for Kavanaugh's confirmation.

One of Jamila Aamer's most vivid childhood memories is learning how to cook. So it may come as no surprise that decades later, she's teaching other young women to do the same.

Aamer is head chef at the Amal Women's Training Center, an airy outdoor café in Marrakech's trendy Gueliz neighborhood that serves up a variety of traditional Moroccan specialties.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Community Voices

Rachel Otwell

Uncovering & Commemorating Springfield’s 1908 Race Riot

Kathryn Harris remembers coming across a manila folder, tucked away in a filing cabinet. It was the seventies, and she was working at Springfield’s public Lincoln Library at the time. The newspaper clippings inside told a story of a city in flames, of lynching s and death — something she hadn’t remembered hearing before.

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Social Action - Thanks for Sharing!

Statewide: Housing Slowdown Emerging

This episode of Statewide includes: Home construction slowdown, synthetic marijuana, trolls in the woods, and more.

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Featured

Vacation Days Piling Up? Here's How To Get The Most Out Of A Short Vacation

As a nation, we could do a better job at taking time off. About half of full-time workers recently surveyed by the U.S. Travel Association didn't take all the paid vacation days they earned last year. More than 700 million vacation days went unused, and we forfeited about 200 million of those days — when vacation benefits didn't roll over. On average, American workers took almost six fewer vacation days than we earned. If you're among this group, you could be missing out on some of the...

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Illinois Issues

Annabelle Shemer, Flickr CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Pharmacist's Order: Birth Control Without The Doctor

Advocates say increasing access to hormonal contraceptives could help reduce unplanned pregnancies. One legislative proposal considered earlier this year aims to do just that by allowing patients to skip a physician's visit and head straight to a pharmacist. But it is having trouble catching on in Illinois.

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Politics

Updated at 5:57 p.m. ET

Michael Cohen, President Trump's former personal lawyer and fixer, has pleaded guilty to eight counts in federal court in New York, WNYC's Andrea Bernstein reports.

They include five counts of tax evasion, one count of falsifying submissions to a bank and two counts involving unlawful campaign contributions.

Cohen's conduct "reflects a pattern of lies and dishonesty over a significant period of time," said Robert Khuzami, deputy U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York outside the federal courthouse in Manhattan.

The Equal Rights Amendment In 2018

4 hours ago

Back in May, Illinois became the 37th state to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment, or ERA.

It could now, conceivably, become part of the Constitution if just one more state ratifies it — either Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Utah or Virginia.

But what, exactly, is the ERA promising?

From Glamour

Updated at 6:01 p.m. ET

A federal jury on Tuesday found Donald Trump's former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort, guilty on eight of the 18 charges he faced in his tax and bank fraud trial.

The verdict delivered a painful fall from grace for a top political operative who has advised presidents from Gerald Ford to Donald Trump and a shot in the arm to an investigation derided by Trump as a "witch hunt."

Massachusetts Democrat Elizabeth Warren insists that she is "not running for president in 2020, I'm running for the Senate in 2018." The senator also said Tuesday that she is urging Democrats to "focus on midterm elections and stop acting like the only important shiny object in the room is 2020."

But the broad anti-corruption and government reform bill that she rolled out in a major speech at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., felt much more like a key plank of a national presidential campaign platform than a portion of Warren's cruise toward a second Senate term.

The median age in America is roughly 37. So most of the people in this country today have no memory of events in the 1970s, much less the 1950s.

But President Trump does. He has not only memories but also direct personal connections to some of the actors in those eras. And the drama of those times remains vivid to him, or at least worthy of mentioning on Twitter.

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The X from NPR Illinois | 91.9-3 HD

More Tiny Desk Contest 'Deskoveries' From Across The Country

Our 2018 Tiny Desk Contest On the Road tour brought us incredible musical discoveries in every city we visited. Year after year, this Contest would be nothing without our dedicated community of creators from every state. We couldn't feature all these artists on our one (short) tour, but luckily, plenty of NPR Member stations from across the country produced their own events featuring some of their local Contest favorites — so we asked them to recap their shows for us. You can read about some...

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NPR Illinois Classic | 91.9-2 HD

Seeking Pay Equity, Female Flutist Sues Boston Symphony Orchestra

Boston Symphony Orchestra principal flutist Elizabeth Rowe has filed a lawsuit against the orchestra, claiming that she is making substantially less each year than her closest peer — a man. Rowe's suit was filed in Massachusetts' Suffolk County Superior Court on Monday morning, the day after a new, statewide equal pay law went into effect. Her suit may be the first gender pay equity claim filed under the Massachusetts Equal Pay Law (MEPA). She is asking for more than $200,000 in unpaid wages...

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