Daisy Contreras / NPR Illinois

Museum Taking Another Look At (Fake?) Lincoln Hat

Officials at Springfield’s Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum, known as the ALPLM, are once again trying to verify the authenticity of a hat once thought to belong to Lincoln.

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Mary Hansen / NPR Illinois

Springfield Launches Campaign To Encourage Census Participation

Springfield officials want to make sure all residents participate in the upcoming census count. The population count begins in March, when residents will get a letter asking them to fill out an online form about their household.

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Community Voices

Courtesy of John Schafer

Springfield Adopts New Solar Rules

Springfield city council members, utility officials, and clean-energy advocates reached an agreement on new rules for rooftop solar panels on Tuesday.

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Social Action - Thanks for Sharing!

Mary Hansen / NPR Illinois

Illinois Looks To Map Who Has Internet Access And Who Doesn’t

Illinois plans on spending $400 million over the next several years to improve internet access to farms and small towns. But first, the state needs to know who has a reliable internet connection and who doesn’t. The federal government tracks where high-speed internet is available. But the mapping has been criticized for overstating access, particularly in rural areas. Around 30 percent of residents living in rural Illinois lack internet access at speeds of 25 mbps and above, according to a...

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Why Gun Violence Is Surging In Toronto

48 minutes ago

Gun violence is a growing problem in Canada's biggest city — and last year was Toronto's worst, with more shootings than any year to date, according to Toronto police statistics.

The highest profile incident came in June, when shots rang out as more than a million fans gathered in Nathan Philips Square to celebrate the Toronto Raptors' first-ever NBA championship. Four people were injured in the shooting and a panicked stampede of fans ensued.

Hope for an effective and inexpensive treatment for the deadly condition sepsis has dimmed following results of a major new study.

Researchers had hoped that a simple treatment involving infusions of vitamin C, vitamin B1 and steroids would work against a disease that kills an estimated 270,000 people each year in the United States and 11 million globally. Sepsis, or blood poisoning, occurs when the body overreacts to infection. It leads to leaky blood vessels, which can cause multiple organ failure.

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Can your boy band do this?

Updated at 9 a.m. ET

New birth-rate figures show that China has so far failed to reverse the effects of its longtime one-child policy — a change that policymakers say is necessary to forestall the long-term economic consequences of an aging and shrinking population.

The National Bureau of Statistics of China released the new data on Friday, the same day it announced that the country's GDP growth has fallen to its lowest level in nearly 30 years.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

It's often how you know yoga class is over: The teacher faces the class with their hands together in a bow, saying "Namaste." Maybe you bow and say it back.

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Transcript: NPR's Full Interview With Defense Secretary Mark Esper On Iran

Defense Secretary Mark Esper talks with All Things Considered host Ari Shapiro at the Pentagon about the U.S. killing of Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani and about the constitutional authority to strike Iranian proxies in Iraq and Iran on its home soil in retaliation for attacks on American forces. Ari Shapiro: Secretary Esper, thank you for speaking with us today. Secretary Mark Esper: Well, thank you, Ari. Thanks for inviting me onto the show. Let me just begin by asking around this time last...

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Analysis & commentary on the events that made news this past week in Illinois state government & politics.

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Arts & Life

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Illinois State Board of Education

The Illinois State Board of Education yesterday approved a budget request seeking $9.6 billion dollars in state funds, most of which will go to the state’s “evidence-based funding” model, designed to bring all school districts up to adequate funding.

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Equity & Justice

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Likely more than 100,000 Illinoisans will lose food stamps under a rule change finalized by President Donald’s Trump administration this week. 

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Health+Harvest Desk

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Recreational cannabis has been legal in Illinois for just under a week, and the state estimates consumers have already bought nearly $11 million worth of product. But the legal industry is only just getting started.

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Illinois Economy

BigThingsInASmallTown

The eastern Illinois community of Casey has followed the lead of roadside novelties promising tourists a chance to see the world's largest (fill in the blank).

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Statehouse

Daisy Contreras / NPR Illinois

Officials at Springfield’s Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum, known as the ALPLM, are once again trying to verify the authenticity of a hat once thought to belong to Lincoln.

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Politics

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On an unusually warm January afternoon, 28-year-old Icy Coomber attended a poster-making session for the fourth annual Women's March in Washington, D.C.

Unlike the friend she accompanied to the event, Coomber did not participate in any of the previous anti-Trump demonstrations. Three years ago, the first march drew hundreds of thousands of people to the nation's capital and hosted sister marches in cities around the world.

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Janis Ian Was More Than Just A Teenager

Morning Edition 's series called One-Hit Wonders / Second-Best Songs focuses on musicians or bands whose careers in the United States are defined by a single monster hit, and explains why their catalogs have much more to offer. In this installment, NPR Music's Ann Powers argues that Janis Ian, who won the Grammy for best pop vocal performance in 1975 for "At Seventeen," pioneered what we now consider the adult contemporary genre. Read Ann in her own words below, and hear the radio version at...

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Opera Star Vittorio Grigolo Fired By Metropolitan Opera, Royal Opera

One of opera's leading men, Italian tenor Vittorio Grigolo, was dismissed Thursday by two of the world's most prestigious houses: the Royal Opera in London and New York's Metropolitan Opera. His firing comes after an investigation by the Royal Opera [RO], which determined that he had demonstrated "inappropriate and aggressive behavior" during an RO tour of Japan in September. What exactly occurred in Tokyo, where Grigolo was singing Charles Gounod's opera Faust on Sept. 18, remains unclear....

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