Mary Hansen / NPR Illinois

State Fair's Ethnic Village Getting Rebrand

Just inside the main gate of the Illinois State Fair sits a cluster of white booths around a gazebo. At the entrances, signs read “Ethnic Village.” For nearly 40 years, fair-goers have found food from around the world as well as music and other performances. But this is the last year it will have that name. Governor J.B. Pritzker recently approved legislation to rename it the “Village of Cultures,” and the signs will change for next year’s fair.

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Illinois' Medical Marijuana Program Is Now Permanent, Expanded

Illinois’ medical marijuana program is getting a second wind. Governor J.B. Pritzker signed a pair of bills on Monday expanding who can get a medical card, and when they can use it.

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Farmers Are Planning For Illinois River Shutdown Next Year

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Lindsay France / Cornell University

Innovation Pie: U Of I Divvies Up $500M State Funds

Most press conferences don’t provide breakfast pastries. But in mid-May, when the University of Illinois announced that every public four-year college in the state had signed on to its Innovation Network, the event was staged with some extra sizzle. Along with muffins, coffee and juice, there was a line-up of college presidents and chancellors, plus Springfield mayor Jim Langfelder, flanked by a big banner showing 15 stars strewn across the state of Illinois.

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Mary Hansen / NPR Illinois

Springfield's Public Works Director On Yard Waste Program and Capital Projects

Springfield started a new yard waste program this spring, and the city is expecting more money for road and railway projects from a statewide capital plan. The city’s Office of Public Works oversees both. NPR Illinois talked with its new director, Nate Bottom, about the changes. The Springfield City Council approved Bottom's appointment last week. The interview covers: -The recycling fee assessed on monthly City Water, Light and Power bills increased to $4.50, up from $3. That money pays for...

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We've invited Mike D'Antoni, head coach of the Houston Rockets, to answer questions about Michael Jordan, Dan Quayle, and Tony the Tiger. Originally broadcast Jan. 12, 2019.

The hall-of-famer who caught many passes from quarterback Joe Montana answers three questions about the Disney teen musical comedy. Originally broadcast Aug. 12, 2017.

We've invited the Pitch Perfect star to answer three questions about a no-hitter thrown by Pittsburgh Pirate Dock Ellis in June 1970. Originally broadcast Sept. 15, 2018.

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Known as "The Wizard" for his magical plays, we asked the former Cardinals shortstop about the 1939 movie The Wizard of Oz. Originally broadcast May 11, 2019.

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It's The Go-To Drug To Treat Opioid Addiction. Why Won't More Pharmacies Stock It?

Louis Morano knows what he needs, and he knows where to get it. Morano, 29, has done seven stints in rehab for opioid addiction in the past 15 years. So, he has come to a mobile medical clinic parked on a corner of Philadelphia's Kensington neighborhood, in the geographical heart of the city's overdose crisis. People call the mobile clinic the "bupe bus." Buprenorphine is a drug that curbs cravings and treats the symptoms of withdrawal from opioid addiction. One of the common brand name drugs...

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Analysis & commentary on the events that made news this past week in Illinois state government & politics.

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Sheila, the narrator of Kimberly King Parson's story "Guts," can't run away from bodies: not her own, not others'. Ever since she started dating Tim, a medical student, "all the sick, broken people in the world begin to glow." She imagines tumors and incipient heart attacks in strangers, all the while remaining conscious of her own body, which fails to bring her joy: "I should love my body more," she reflects, but she doesn't.

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Lindsay France / Cornell University

Most press conferences don’t provide breakfast pastries. But in mid-May, when the University of Illinois announced that every public four-year college in the state had signed on to its Innovation Network, the event was staged with some extra sizzle. Along with muffins, coffee and juice, there was a line-up of college presidents and chancellors, plus Springfield mayor Jim Langfelder, flanked by a big banner showing 15 stars strewn across the state of Illinois.

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One southern Illinois community gathers forces together to prepare for the count.

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The President and CEO of Land of Lincoln Goodwill has resigned, just a day after reversing a controversial decision to lay off disabled workers.  

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As Democrats and Republicans gear up for next year’s election, the parties rallied in Springfield this week with events timed to the Illinois State Fair.

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"How does one man have so much power?"

One hears that question asked in Washington a lot these days, often with exasperation and bewilderment.

And it is not always a reference to President Trump.

Quite often, the man in question is Mitch McConnell, the Republican senator from Kentucky.

The man who calls himself the "Grim Reaper" — of signature Democratic initiatives.

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The trailer for one of the most anticipated movies of the year dropped this week.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "LITTLE WOMEN")

SAOIRSE RONAN: (As Jo) I'm working on a novel. It is a story of my life and my sisters.

TIMOTHEE CHALAMET: (As Theodore 'Laurie' Laurence) This is Meg, Amy, Beth and Jo.

KELLY: As in "Little Women."

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The back and forth over the congresswomen's visit, now non-visit, to Israel is where we begin our weekly politics chat. Today I am joined by Politico's Eliana Johnson.

Welcome back.

ELIANA JOHNSON: Thank you.

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Burn, Don't Freeze: Sleater-Kinney On Making Art In The Midst Of Change

Sleater-Kinney got a new beginning a few years ago. In 2006, the trio — guitarists Corin Tucker and Carrie Brownstein and drummer Janet Weiss — announced a hiatus, after half a dozen albums that had made it one of the most respected and beloved rock bands around. In 2015, that hiatus ended with No Cities to Love , a comeback record whose warm reception was a reminder that the band's influence had only grown in its years away. The new album The Center Won't Hold , out today, is a fresh chapter...

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Opera Star David Daniels Indicted For Sexual Assault In Texas

Updated Aug. 1 at 8:14 p.m. ET Opera star David Daniels has been indicted in Texas on a felony charge of sexual assault. A grand jury indicted Daniels in Harris County District Court on July 25. Also indicted on the same charge is Daniels' husband, William Walters, who goes by the name Scott. In Texas, sexual assault of an adult is a Class 2 felony; if convicted, Daniels and Walter could face between two and 20 years in prison. The 53-year-old Daniels was, until last year, one of the world's...

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