Carrie Kahn

Carrie Kahn is NPR's International Correspondent based in Mexico City, Mexico. She covers Mexico, the Caribbean, and Central America. Kahn's reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning news programs including All Things Considered, Morning Edition, and Weekend Edition.

Since arriving in Mexico in the summer of 2012, on the eve of the election of President Enrique Peña Nieto and the PRI party's return to power, Kahn has reported on everything from the rise in violence throughout the country to its powerful drug cartels, and the arrest, escape, and re-arrest of Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman. She has covered extensively the increasing Central American migration through the region, gang violence in Central America, and the historic détente between the Obama Administration and Cuba.

Prior to her post in Mexico, Kahn had been a National Correspondent based in Los Angeles since joining NPR in 2003. During that time, Kahn often reported on and from Mexico, including covering the country's presidential election in 2012. She was the first NPR reporter into Haiti after the devastating earthquake in early 2010, and returned to the country on numerous occasions to continue NPR's coverage of the Caribbean nation.

Her work included assignments throughout California and the West. In 2010 Kahn was awarded the Headliner Award for Best in Show and Best Investigative Story for her work covering U.S. informants involved in the Mexican Drug War. In 2005, Kahn was part of NPR's extensive coverage of Hurricane Katrina, where she investigated claims of euthanasia in New Orleans hospitals, recovery efforts along the Gulf Coast, and resettlement of city residents in Houston, TX. Since then, she has covered her share of hurricanes, firestorms and mudslides in Southern California, and the controversial life and death of pop-icon Michael Jackson. In 2008, as China hosted the world's athletes, Kahn recorded a remembrance of her Jewish grandfather and his decision to compete in Hitler's 1936 Olympics.

Before coming to NPR in 2003, Kahn worked for two and a half years at NPR station KQED in San Francisco, first as an editor and then as a general assignment reporter with a focus on immigration reporting. From 1994 to 2001, Kahn was the border and community affairs reporter at NPR station KPBS in San Diego, where she covered Northern Mexico, immigration, cross-border issues, and the city's ethnic communities.

Kahn's work has been cited for fairness and balance by the Poynter Institute of Media Studies. She was awarded and completed a Pew Fellowship in International Journalism at Johns Hopkins University.

Kahn received a bachelor's degree in biology from UC Santa Cruz. For several years, she was a human genetics researcher in California and in Costa Rica. She has traveled extensively throughout Mexico, Central America, Europe, and the Middle East, where she worked on a English/Hebrew/Arabic magazine.

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José José, the revered Mexican singer known as the "Prince of Song," died Saturday, Sept. 28, in Miami. He was 71 years old.

As leaders from around the world spent Monday at the United Nations Climate Action Summit pledging to ban coal and cut carbon emissions, Mexico's president was at his weekday news conference showing off a new app that tells consumers where the cheapest gas in the country can be found.

And it's not just Monday's events in New York. President Andrés Manuel López Obrador is skipping the annual United Nations General Assembly altogether.

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This year, Mexico surpassed Syria to become the deadliest country for journalists, according to the New York-based Committee to Protect Journalists.

Many consider that overall levels of violence and impunity in Mexico are the biggest problems facing Mexican journalists. But press advocates say the president's harsh rhetoric toward the media isn't helping the situation.

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Guatemala's president elect is a 63-year-old conservative who once ran the country's prison system. And he ran three unsuccessful bids for the presidency before winning this time around.

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A picture of an armed Mexican National Guard soldier impeding a crying migrant mother and her child from getting to the United States is spreading on social media and making headlines in Mexico.

Critics of Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador's tighter border enforcement have seized on the image to decry Mexico's new security plan, implemented after intense pressure from the Trump administration.

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As we just heard, the Trump administration has been leaning on Mexico and Guatemala to become safe third countries, and we're going to hear from one of those countries now. NPR's Carrie Kahn is in Guatemala City. Hi there.

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President Trump says he thinks there's a good chance that U.S. and Mexican officials can hammer out a deal on migrants. Tweeting from Air Force One today, he again said that if the talks fail, 5% tariffs would go into effect starting Monday.

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Mexico and the U.S. have made some progress on immigration talks, with Mexico promising to get tougher on border enforcement.

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On the Mexican side of the border, U.S. tariffs would also have a major impact. NPR's Carrie Kahn spoke with business leaders and workers tied to Mexico's export economy in Tijuana.

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Mickael Behn isn't Cuban. Neither is his family. But their connection to Cuba dates to 1917, when his great-grandfather bought prime Havana harbor property from the Cuban government. Behn's grandfather took over the commercial business in 1947 and ran the Havana Docks Corp. until mid-November 1960.

Fidel Castro's revolutionary army had overthrown the dictatorship of Fulgencio Batista the year before. But on Nov. 21, 1960, two armed men barged into Behn's grandfather's office on the docks.

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When a passenger jet crashed in Indonesia last year, Dennis Muilenburg said what airline executives commonly say.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

DENNIS MUILENBURG: The bottom line here is the 737 Max is safe.

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