Arts & Life

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It's been a summer of heat waves in the Northern Hemisphere. But in Australia, a group of kangaroos is enjoying wintry conditions.

Stephen Grenfell captured their joy as the troop leaped across open fields, undeterred by the cold, wet ground just north of Goulburn, in New South Wales.

Updated at 5:05 p.m. ET

The Dayton mass shooter had his friend buy him body armor, a gun accessory and a 100-round magazine allegedly used in the massacre this month. Prosecutors say the friend stored the items in his apartment to hide them from the shooter's parents, according to federal charges unsealed on Monday.

Updated 5:30 p.m.

Thousands of guns have been turned in to New Zealand police as part of a nationwide gun buyback program created after a massacre earlier this year left 51 people dead.

Following attacks on two Christchurch mosques, New Zealand's parliament voted overwhelmingly to ban most semi-automatic weapons along with certain kinds of ammunition and large-capacity magazines.

NPR Goes Beyond the Streets In NY

Aug 12, 2019

Curated by graffiti historian and urban anthropologist Roger Gastman, BEYOND THE STREETS examines the fundamental human need for public self-expression. Showcased in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, the exhibit features artists with roots in graffiti and street art whose work have evolved into highly disciplined studio practices, alongside historical cultural figures inspired by this art form.

Water resources around the world are under a lot of pressure. One way to recycle water is to reuse it. It’s called greywater, which is the water that drains from your shower, sink or washing machine.

Tensions have been on the rise in the Gulf since the U.S. pulled out of the 2015 nuclear deal and reimposed sanctions aimed at Iran’s oil exports. After Iran seized a British tanker last month, the U.S. launched a naval mission to protect shipping in the Strait of Hormuz, a crucial choke point between the Persian Gulf and the Indian Ocean through which about one fifth of the world’s oil travels.

Perseid Meteor Shower Peaks Monday Night

Aug 12, 2019

Monday night is the peak of the Perseid meteor shower, which comes every year at this time. Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks to Sky & Telescope senior editor Kelly Beatty (@NightSkyGuy) about what will be visible and when we should look.

This article was originally published on WBUR.org.

Hong Kong airport officials cancelled more than 150 flights Monday as thousands of protesters crammed into the terminal.

This is the latest in a series of prolonged protests against the government, but Monday’s demonstration at the airport was sparked by allegations of police violence over the weekend.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with NPR’s Anthony Kuhn (@akuhnNPRnews).

Investigators are trying to find out what caused the tragic fire that killed five young children in Erie, Pennsylvania, at a day care center. The tragedy highlights how critical day care is for working families in America.

But child care is almost unaffordable for many in the U.S. The average cost can be as high as $1,200 a month. In Maine, just getting a spot in a center is also a major challenge.

Nearly 80 million Americans carry medical debt, which contributes to 50% of American bankruptcies — or worse.

Students are back for the first day of school Monday in El Paso, Texas, at the city’s largest school district. It’s been a little over a week after 22 people were killed in mass shooting at a local Walmart. The youngest victim was 15-year-old Javier Amir Rodriguez.

Here & Now’s Robin Young speaks with Javier’s former teacher, Adrian Barrios, who teaches social studies at Ricardo Estrada Middle School in El Paso.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young talks to cultural anthropologist Angela Stuesse about how poultry workers went from being mostly white women in the 1950s to Hispanic immigrants today.

This article was originally published on WBUR.org.

Letting Go

Aug 12, 2019
Jason Falchook

Chris Foley inherits his family's male pattern baldness.

Caridad De La Luz contends with her father's baggage.

Andrew McGill discovers his people though the card game Yu-Gi-Oh.

Patricia Brennan describes being married to a Vietnam veteran.

Michael VonAllmen works to let go of his hate after his wrongful conviction. 

I'm not sure that any creature is more marvelous than the honeybee, with its highly evolved social organization, its ability to create honey, and, of course, the stinger that causes us to take heed whenever we hear buzzing. The pain it threatens makes it easy to think you need an almost-monastic devotion to become a beekeeper.

Sister Helen Prejean is best known for her 1993 memoir, Dead Man Walking, about her role as a spiritual adviser to a convicted killer on death row. The story was adapted into an Oscar-winning film starring Susan Sarandon and Sean Penn. Prejean has accompanied six prisoners to their executions and has been at the forefront of activism against the death penalty.

The first time that Simone Biles performed a triple-double at the U.S. Gymnastics Championships in Kansas City, she wasn't pleased. After soaring through the air to complete two flips and three full twists on Friday, she stumbled.

On Sunday, the 22-year-old did it again — and stuck the landing. It's the first time a woman has done so in competition.

The reigning world champion finished the competition on Sunday with the U.S. all-around title. It's her sixth.

Timothy C. Winegard's The Mosquito is as wildly entertaining as any epic narrative out there. It's also all true.

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On a small island, objects disappear — perfume, boats, roses, photographs — and the memory police monitor the inhabitants, ensuring these things will be eternally forgotten. It seems like a metaphor for state surveillance; if The Memory Police were an American novel, it might yield a contrarian hero determined to fight off the tyranny of the police. It would be something akin to The Handmaid's Tale, or the movie version of Minority Report.

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And let's talk about this more with one of the lawyers for some of Epstein's alleged victims and talk about what may happen next. Paul Cassell is representing four women in federal court in Florida and joins me this morning. Welcome to the program.

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The air tingles with prose. Patrons perch atop bar stools, but they aren't drinking. Individuals congregate together as a group, but they aren't talking.

Paperbacks adorn a table stained by water rings, and tote bags dangle over the backs of chairs. Classic rock is blaring from the speakers, but at this table, silence rings out.

A Silent Book Club is meeting.

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Last night, the undisputed queen of U.S. gymnastics made the impossible possible again.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED ANNOUNCER: (Laughter) Money. Just keep making history, Simone Biles.

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