Updated at 11:45 a.m. ET

Rebekah Jones, the data scientist who helped create Florida's COVID-19 dashboard, has turned herself in to police, in response to an arrest warrant issued by the state.

Jones is charged with one count of "offenses against users of computers, computer systems, computer networks and electronic devices," the Florida Department of Law Enforcement said in a statement Monday.

From the March on Washington in 1963 up until his assassination in 1968, the FBI engaged in an intense campaign to discredit Martin Luther King Jr. and his work. Film director Sam Pollard chronicles those efforts in the new documentary, MLK/FBI.

When Nadia Owusu was 7 years old and living in Rome with her father, stepmother and younger sister, two events occurred on the same day that upended her world.

The first was a disaster she didn't experience personally, but heard about on the radio: a catastrophic earthquake in Armenia, where her mother's family had lived before they sought refuge in America. The second was the sudden appearance of her mother, standing nervously at the front door, gripping a pair of red balloons in her hands.

The NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund is launching a scholarship program designed to produce a new team of civil rights advocates working for racial justice in the South.

Unveiled on Monday — Martin Luther King Jr. Day — the program will offer free tuition and room and board, a commitment intended to remove barriers for students deterred by the steep costs of law school.

Eager to get out of the house and enjoy the outdoors, more people than ever are hitting the slopes on skis and snowboards.

"Oh, yeah. I mean, we sold probably a thousand more season passes this year than we ever had," says John DeVivo, the General Manager of Cannon Mountain in New Hampshire. "We were up about 20% in pass sales."

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

On January 6, thousands of rioters pushed past police barriers, defied police orders to retreat and illegally broke into the U.S. Capitol building. Police officers were injured trying to control the crowd. One was killed. Now we are learning that some of the rioters were sworn officers themselves. I'm joined now by Kimberly Kindy. She's an investigative reporter for The Washington Post.

Hey there.

KIMBERLY KINDY: Hey, thanks for having me.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

NOEL KING, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

NOEL KING, HOST:

We continue to remember some of the nearly 400,000 people we've lost to coronavirus in the U.S. We want to tell you about Florinda Flores from Roswell, N.M.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

On January 6, thousands of rioters pushed past police barriers, defied police orders to retreat and illegally broke into the U.S. Capitol building. Police officers were injured trying to control the crowd. One was killed. Now we are learning that some of the rioters were sworn officers themselves. I'm joined now by Kimberly Kindy. She's an investigative reporter for The Washington Post.

Hey there.

KIMBERLY KINDY: Hey, thanks for having me.

Pages