Arts & Life

Arts and lifestyle coverage from around the globe and Illinois.

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Summertime is for road trips. Atlas Obscura and All Things Considered are traveling up the West Coast, from California to Washington, in search of "hidden wonders" — unique but overlooked people and places.

The Trump administration could be on the verge of cutting millions of dollars of aid to the Palestinians, funds that could be critical at a time when there's a humanitarian crisis in the Gaza Strip, current and former U.S. officials tell NPR.

Early this year, the United States froze most of the $251 million earmarked for Palestinian aid projects, after the Palestinian Authority protested the administration's recognition of the contested city of Jerusalem as Israel's capital.

The legal fight over the controversial citizenship question on the 2020 census is likely to continue at San Francisco federal court.

"I believe the case will proceed," U.S. District Judge Richard Seeborg said Friday during a hearing on whether to dismiss two of the lawsuits against the Census Bureau and the Commerce Department, which oversees the census.

All companies start out as private enterprises. That means there are only a handful of shareholders in the firm, and sometimes just one. But at some point, the company's owners might decide to 'go public', and put their shares up for sale on a public exchange for anyone to buy.

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Ling Ma was in the last months of a tedious office job when she began writing her first novel. The company was downsizing, and as her coworkers got laid off, the office became "silent and desolate," Ma recalls.

Eventually Ma lost her job, too. The first few weeks were liberating — she called her unemployment check her "arts fellowship" — and she turned her attention to her debut novel.

"Hearing it changed everything for me," former White House aide Omarosa Manigault Newman told NPR on Friday.

Manigault Newman was referring to what she calls the "N-word tape" — a long-rumored but never surfaced tape of Donald Trump on the set of The Apprentice allegedly using the racial slur. In her interview with NPR's Rachel Martin, Manigault Newman claims to have heard the tape and heard Trump using that slur on the tape.

But that's not what it says in her tell-all book, Unhinged, due out on Tuesday.

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Most summer movies tell a pretty straightforward story. "Madeline's Madeline" is a little different. Where it's going isn't complicated, but critic Bob Mondello says it toys with the viewer's perceptions every step of the way.

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The United Kingdom has decided to allow a 9-year-old chess prodigy to remain in the country, after his father's work visa expired and his family faced deportation back to India.

Shreyas Royal is "very delighted" with the news, his father tells NPR by email.

Every morning, we open our inboxes and find... your questions. Dozens of questions. Like, where does the money from a tariff go? What would happen to the economy if literally no one was unemployed? And why do RV dealerships have so many RV's?

Today on the show, we dig through all those questions and answer some our favorites. We do the math to figure out the cost of having life vests on airplanes, and try to determine whether they are worth it. We learn about a uncommon way of paying for an apartment in South Korea.

For you, dear listeners, we even touch a tariff.

The city of San Francisco inaugurates this weekend a new multi-modal transportation center. The Transbay Transit Center cost more than $2 billion and will connect the city’s buses and BART subway system, and will have a terminal for a planned high-speed rail link to Los Angeles.

November’s midterm elections are fast approaching — but some voters may find they’re no longer registered to vote, even if they’re eligible. The Brennan Center for Justice at New York University Law School has released research showing an uptick in voter roll purges, including some removals that it says are illegal.

To tell how the nation's first black beer festival came to be held in Pittsburgh, you might start with a beer.

Maybe it was that introductory Sam Adams Boston Lager that longtime Michelob and Heineken guy Mike Potter drank more than a decade ago. "It had a completely different profile, a completely different taste, you know, completely different aroma," he says. "It just elevated my curiosity."

In the tumultuous two weeks surrounding Zimbabwe's presidential election --the country's first since the ouster of longtime strongman Robert Mugabe --opposition leader Nelson Chamisa has made no secret of what he thinks of its results.

NASA expects to launch a space probe Saturday that will explore the atmosphere around the sun.

The judge in the trial of Paul Manafort, U.S. District Court Judge T.S. Ellis III, has been making headlines this week for being hard on the prosecutors. But Thursday, he admitted he was “probably wrong” when he called out prosecutors for allowing a government witness to sit in court before his testimony.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Emily Bazelon (@emilybazelon), staff writer for the New York Times Magazine and fellow at Yale Law School.

Michael Moore releases his documentary “Fahrenheit 11/9” on Sept. 21. The film is a continuation of Moore’s anti-Trump crusade, which was also at the center of his one-man show which ran on Broadway last year.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talked with Moore (@MMFlint) about that show in October.

President Trump tweeted Friday that he wants to double steel and aluminum tariffs against Turkey as the lira, the national currency there, hit another record low amid an ongoing dispute with the U.S.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young talks about how that story and more are playing out on social media with Femi Oke (@FemiOke) of Al Jazeera English.

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NPR this week discovered ethical violations in many reports prepared for it by freelance journalist Danielle Karson, who has filed radio stories for NPR since the early 1980s.

NPR is no longer accepting reports from Karson and its investigation into her work continues.

Here is what is known so far:

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Episode #1833

Aug 10, 2018

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Since the Holy Fire ignited Monday in Orange County, Calif., the blaze ravaged more than 10,000 acres, destroyed at least 12 structures and forced more than 21,000 people to evacuate their homes by Thursday night. But amid all these grim and rising numbers, California's Department of Forestry and Fire Protection has listed just one cause: "human."

North Korea is renewing its harsh criticism of the United States for failing to live up to the spirit of the Singapore summit, but Pyongyang is sparing President Trump as it blames "some high-level officials" within the administration.

The foreign ministry said in a statement on Thursday that the U.S. should not expect North Korea to follow through on promises to denuclearize as long as Washington adheres to "old scenarios" that have failed in the past.

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