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Day after day, you're seeing stories about the 2020 census on the front page and all over TV news, even though the once-a-decade head count is still months away.

The president wants the census questionnaire to include: "Is this person a citizen of the United States?" He's willing to delay the count "for as long as it takes" to have it his way.

Facing a backlash, Home Depot sought to distance itself from billionaire co-founder Bernie Marcus after he pledged to back President Trump's bid for re-election in 2020.

Calls to boycott the retailer took off this week on social media as news spread that Marcus told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution late last month that he plans to support Trump's bid for another term.

The U.S. Women’s National Team (USWNT) are world champions yet again.

This American team’s impact will be felt far beyond the 2019 tournament.

Sports Illustrated’s Grant Wahl wrote about the tournament, and he also spoke to former USWNT captain Julie Foudy about it.

Updated at 1:15 p.m. ET

A constitutional challenge to President Trump's continued ownership of his businesses has been ordered dismissed by a federal appeals court.

The case was brought by the attorneys general of Washington, D.C., and Maryland, arguing that Trump had violated the domestic and foreign emoluments clauses of the U.S. Constitution by accepting money from state and foreign governments via his Washington hotel and business empire.

Updated at 7:34 p.m. ET

Stocks rallied Wednesday as Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell testified about challenges facing the U.S. economy, adding to expectations that the central bank will cut interest rates later this month.

The Fed had hinted at such a cut in June.

Sen. Cory Booker is proposing a preemptive strike against using a citizenship question on the 2020 census in a way that he says could give Republicans a political advantage.

In Philadelphia, 30 parks and recreation centers are outfitted with a small speaker called the Mosquito. It blares a constant, high-pitched ringing noise all night long — but one that only teenagers and young adults can hear.

Anyone over age 25 is supposed to be immune because, basically, their ear cells have started to die off.

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Labor Secretary Alex Acosta has at least one prominent defender. President Trump spoke of the cabinet secretary who's now questioned for a decision he made in a sex crimes case years ago.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

The goal of the National African American Gun Association is to introduce black Americans to guns and also instruct them on how to use them.

Some see the group as an alternative to the National Rifle Association for black gun owners, but it has some notable differences. Organizers say it is a civil rights organization that aims to build community and promote self-protection.

Since its creation in 2015, the group has seen rapid growth with roughly 30,000 members and 75 chapters nationwide. Leaders expect another 25 chapters by next year.

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Facing a House of Representatives controlled by Democrats who are issuing document demands and subpoenas, President Trump's White House counsel's office grew its payroll by nearly a third, newly released records reveal.

From 2018 to 2019, the counsel's office added 10 people.

The Pentagon's comptroller said it cost an extra $1.2 million to put on its portion of President Trump's "Salute to America" program for an expanded Fourth of July celebration in Washington, D.C., last week.

Defense Department officials said on Tuesday spending for personnel involvement and demonstrations largely came from their training budgets.

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Now let's bring NPR's Selena Simmons-Duffin to explain how today's news fits into this long history of challenges to the Affordable Care Act.

Welcome to the studio, Selena.

SELENA SIMMONS-DUFFIN, BYLINE: Hi.

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Today, the Affordable Care Act is on trial again, this time at a federal appeals court in Louisiana. It's the latest in a string of challenges to the health care overhaul ever since President Obama signed it into law.

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H. Ross Perot died today at the age of 89. The Texas billionaire will be remembered for challenging the U.S. political system by running for president twice as an independent. NPR's Brian Naylor has this look at Perot's life.

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Top Democrats are calling for Labor Secretary Alex Acosta to resign over the way he handled the prosecution of multimillionaire Jeffrey Epstein more than a decade ago.

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Former Vice President Joe Biden has referred to himself as "middle class Joe" throughout his political career, and used to regularly joke about being the "poorest person on Congress."

Those terms no longer apply.

Biden and his wife, Jill, have together earned more than $15 million since Biden left office. That's according to tax returns and other financial disclosure forms released by Biden's campaign on Tuesday. The bulk of the Bidens' earnings come from book sales and paid speaking engagements – two routine sources of income for former high-ranking public officials.

A federal appeals court in Manhattan says President Trump cannot block critics from his Twitter account, calling it "unconstitutional viewpoint discrimination."

There's a split going on among lawmakers in Alaska this week, but it's more than just political. For a special legislative session convened by Republican Gov. Mike Dunleavy to address his line-item budget vetoes, some lawmakers came to Juneau, the state capital, and a smaller contingent of Republicans who are aligned with the governor gathered in Wasilla, Alaska, a more conservative part of the state.

Courtesy of the Education Justice Project

The new director of the Illinois Department of Corrections said during a legislative hearing in Chicago on Monday that the agency plans to revise its policy regarding what books can and cannot enter the prison. 

Updated at 2:47 p.m. ET

President Trump is standing by Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta, at least for now.

Acosta is facing calls for his resignation after new sex trafficking charges were filed against multimillionaire Jeffrey Epstein on Monday.

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This is FRESH AIR. I'm Terry Gross. The Supreme Court handed down two decisions at the end of their session last month that could have a big impact on the outcome of elections in the States. The court ruled it had no power to intervene when states use partisan gerrymandering to draw maps for electoral districts, saying it was an issue for state legislatures and state courts. And in a related case, the court ruled that the Trump administration could not add a citizenship question to the census.

Updated at 5 p.m. ET

Ross Perot, the colorful Texas billionaire businessman who ran twice for president, first as an independent and then as a third-party candidate, died early Tuesday at his home in Dallas. He was 89.

Perot, who had battled leukemia, was surrounded by family members when he died, his family said in a statement.

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