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When the annual Conservative Political Action Conference — CPAC for short — kicks off Thursday in Orlando, Fla., it might as well be called TPAC.

That's because this year, it is all about Trump.

The former president will headline the event with a Sunday afternoon keynote address, his first speech since leaving office last month.

The massive failure of the Texas energy system has spurred a blame game and fresh calls for reform. Texas lawmakers are debating what went wrong, and how to keep it from happening again.

Drew Garza welcomed the Biden White House lifting a ban on transgender recruits. But Garza and other would-be transgender recruits are waiting for the formal requirements and rules for their service.

The day before President Biden's allies on Capitol Hill were set to roll out his sweeping immigration overhaul, a group of activists rallied outside of the headquarters of the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency, projecting a message onto the building's façade.

"ICE is deporting and torturing people," the all-caps message read. "Abolish ICE and CBP," a reference to U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

President Biden on Wednesday revoked a freeze that his predecessor had put on many types of visas due to the COVID-19 pandemic, saying the order did not advance U.S. interests and hurt industries and individuals alike.

"It harms the United States, including by preventing certain family members of United States citizens and lawful permanent residents from joining their families here," Biden said in a proclamation revoking the measure.

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This week, we're remembering some of the more than 500,000 people in the U.S. who have died from COVID-19 through the music that gave their lives meaning. We're calling our tribute songs of remembrance. Today, Lionel Mares shares stories about his mother, Maria Angelica Mares, of Sun Valley, Calif. He says the song his mom loved was "I Walk The Line" by Johnny Cash.

(SOUNDBITE OF JOHNNY CASH SONG, "I WALK THE LINE")

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell slammed House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's draft proposal for a commission to investigate the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol, calling it "partisan by design."

As President Joe Biden works to overhaul U.S. health care policy, few challenges will loom larger for his health secretary than restoring access to family planning while parrying legal challenges to abortion proliferating across the country.

Physicians, clinics and women's health advocates are looking to Xavier Becerra, Biden's nominee to run the Department of Health and Human Services, to help swiftly unwind Trump-era funding cuts and rules that have decimated the nation's network of reproductive health providers over the past four years.

The cost of repairing damages from the attack on the U.S. Capitol and related security expenses have already topped $30 million and will keep rising, Architect of the Capitol J. Brett Blanton told lawmakers on Wednesday.

The events of Jan. 6, he said, were "difficult for the American people and extremely hard for all of us on campus to witness."

Blanton said that congressional appropriations committees have already approved a transfer request of $30 million to pay for expenses and extend a temporary perimeter fencing contract through March 31.

If your mail has not been showing up some days, or you're getting second notices on the bills you thought you'd paid, you're not alone. The U.S. Postal Service has been beset by continuing delays in delivering the mail.

Postmaster General Louis DeJoy is developing a 10-year strategic plan to address those problems, and will discuss the proposal before the House oversight committee Wednesday.

But it's already drawing criticism from congressional Democrats and some of the Post Office's biggest customers.

NPR's Noel King talks to Sen. Amy Klobuchar, the chair of the rules committee, which co-sponsored the first joint hearing concerning security during the Capitol insurrection on Jan. 6.

A coalition of evangelical Christian leaders is condemning the role of "radicalized Christian nationalism" in feeding the political extremism that led to the violent insurrection at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 by supporters of former President Donald Trump.

President Biden is hoping mayors will help make the case for his COVID-19 aid bill, which mayors say is desperately needed to bolster their cities. But funding for local governments is a flashpoint.

President Biden is expected to sign an order on Wednesday to kick off sweeping reviews of products that have run short in recent months, including semiconductors and pharmaceutical ingredients.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

When the school district in Pima, Ariz., got its first round of federal pandemic relief last summer, Superintendent Sean Rickert put it toward the expenses incurred while suddenly shifting classes online at the start of the pandemic.

Now, as some Republicans in Congress question why COVID-19 aid for schools has not yet been spent, Rickert is just learning how much his district will get from a second relief bill approved in December.

Judges with backgrounds as prosecutors or corporate lawyers, who represent the majority of federal district court jurists, are significantly more likely to rule in favor of employers in workplace disputes, according to a new study of diversity on the bench.

Emory University law professor Joanna Shepherd conducted the study, which which she described as the first published research about whether judges from certain professional backgrounds are more likely to rule against workers.

Shortages of medical supplies and ingredients for pharmaceuticals came into stark focus during the early days of the coronavirus pandemic, when hospital workers resorted to reusing masks and gloves to try to keep themselves safe from COVID-19.

More recently, automakers were forced to shut down plants because of a shortage of computer chips, putting workers on furlough.

Xavier Becerra, President Biden's nominee for health secretary, faced two hours of questions before a Senate committee on Tuesday.

NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with attorney Beth Wilkinson about Merrick Garland, President Biden's nominee for attorney general, and his work on the Oklahoma City bombing prosecution in 1995.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Hour after hour, in testimony that was sometimes dense, senators and witnesses discussed everything from protective gear for officers to communications between law enforcement agencies to what can be done to prevent future attacks.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Hour after hour, in testimony that was sometimes dense, senators and witnesses discussed everything from protective gear for officers to communications between law enforcement agencies to what can be done to prevent future attacks.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

President Joe Biden's historic pick to manage the nation's public lands and natural resources promised to strike a balance between fossil fuel and renewable energy development during her confirmation hearing, Tuesday.

Congresswoman Deb Haaland would be not just the first Native American Interior Secretary, but also the first in a presidential cabinet. She faced tough — and, at times, misguided — questioning from Republican lawmakers worried about the president's climate goals.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Updated 12:59 p.m. ET

Former U.S. Capitol Security officials told Congress during a joint hearing on Tuesday they did not have sufficient information ahead of Jan. 6 to accurately predict the scale of the attack.

With his agency facing continued delivery delays and financial issues, Postmaster General Louis DeJoy will appear before a congressional panel Wednesday. He's working on reform, but some want him out.

Democrats did not do as well in the 2020 Election with Latino voters as they had hoped they would — particularly in South Florida, where the Latino vote is crucial. So what happened?

President Biden plans to welcome Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and a delegation of Canadian officials to the White House on Tuesday – a virtual session due to COVID-19 constraints that will try to recreate some of the ceremonial flourishes of an in-person visit to Washington.

Biden and Trudeau plan to discuss the public health and economic crises caused by the pandemic, as well as shared goals on addressing climate change, addressing racism and discrimination, and other issues, a senior U.S. administration official told reporters ahead of the meeting.

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