Politics

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Updated at 6:07 p.m. ET

Republican Brian Kemp will be the next governor of Georgia, with Democrat Stacey Abrams admitting Friday afternoon that there was no path to victory, following a bitter 10-day battle since Election Day.

Texas' Board of Education voted Friday to change the way its students learn about the Civil War. Beginning in the 2019-2020 school year, students will be taught that slavery played a "central role" in the war.

The state's previous social studies standards listed three causes for the Civil War: sectionalism, states' rights and slavery, in that order. In September, the board's Democrats proposed listing slavery as the only cause.

The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear oral arguments in a dispute over evidence for the census citizenship question lawsuits. After the Trump administration added a controversial question about U.S. citizenship status to the 2020 census, more than two dozen states and cities, plus other groups, sued to get it removed.

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Conservative lawyer George Conway says he no longer feels comfortable in the Republican Party. And he is urging fellow conservatives to speak up more loudly, when they see President Trump challenging the rule of law.

Conway's frequent criticism of the president attracts outsize attention because he is married to White House counselor Kellyanne Conway.

Protesters across Ireland took to the streets this week chanting and carrying thongs, after a 27-year-old man was acquitted of rape during a trial in which his lawyer cited the lacy underwear worn by his 17-year-old accuser.

"You have to look at the way she was dressed," defense attorney Elizabeth O'Connell said, according to the Irish Examiner. "She was wearing a thong with a lace front."

Friday News Roundup - Domestic

3 hours ago

The midterms are over. Long live the midterms.

A number of contests from last week still haven’t been decided.

So reports of a blue wave crashing against a red wall may have been slightly off. Yes, the Senate will stay in GOP hands and the House will flip to the Democrats. But the governorships of Florida and Georgia are still undetermined, and the final nationwide vote may look bluer than previously thought.

Updated at 2:13 p.m. ET

President Trump has completed written answers to questions about the Russia investigation from Justice Department special counsel Robert Mueller.

The president told reporters on Friday that he wrote the answers, not his lawyers, and that he did so "very easily."

Trump said he suspected some of the questions were designed to be pitfalls and catch him in a "perjury trap" — to induce to him to lie about things for which prosecutors might already have contradictory evidence.

Election workers in Florida have been counting remaining ballots by hand in the close U.S. Senate and state agriculture commissioner contests, as a number of lawsuits are still outstanding in the final 48 hours before official election results are due to the state.

If a federal judge declines to extend the state's deadline, county canvassing boards need to turn in their official results following machine and manual recounts by noon on Sunday.

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Prosecutors are negotiating a potential plea agreement with the Russian woman who was charged over the summer with being a clandestine foreign agent.

The U.S. attorney's office for Washington, D.C., said in a court filing that its lawyers are in talks with counsel for the woman, Maria Butina, who also was charged with alleged conspiracy.

Her lawyers have said she is simply a naive young woman who was "jabbering" about her efforts to influence U.S. politicians.

Updated at 6:15 p.m. ET

A federal judge in Washington, D.C., delivered a decisive blow to President Trump Friday, ruling in favor of CNN and the news media.

Judge Timothy Kelly, a Trump appointee, ordered the White House to restore correspondent Jim Acosta's press credentials, something the White House said later it would do.

Updated at 12:00 p.m. ET

The U.S. government may be preparing criminal charges against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, according to suggestions in a document filed in an unrelated case.

Assange's name appeared at least twice in papers filed in the Eastern District Court of Virginia, both times appearing to say that Assange has already been made the subject of his own case.

Prosecutors in Virginia say the court document was an error.

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GOP's Strategy Post-Midterm Elections

13 hours ago

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Georgia Governor Still Undecided

13 hours ago

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A feeling of déjà vu washed over me as I sat in the courtroom for Jim Acosta's legal fight over his White House press pass this week. I, too, once got shut down on my beat, though not by a president. I was saved not by a lawsuit but by a Republican lawyer — indeed, one of the lawyers now representing CNN in the Acosta case.

But I am getting ahead of myself.

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It's been less than two weeks since the midterm elections. In fact, some races have yet to be decided. But chatter about who the Democrats will put up against President Trump two years from now has already begun.

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Florida is used to being in the news for unflattering reasons.

MICHAEL GRUNWALD: Well, it does seem that America's national messes always seem to stream through Florida (laughter), you know, whether it's the financial crisis or the recount of 2000.

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An appellate court in Brooklyn ruled Wednesday that local police officers in New York state can't hold immigrants in custody beyond their release date solely to turn them over to Immigration and Customs Enforcement without a judicial warrant.

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