Equity & Justice

Race, Ethnicity, Gender, Culture, Income, and Justice

Pope Francis is hoping to give the Vatican Secret Archive an image makeover by changing the name of the ancient collection to something less mysterious.

Francis declared that the collection, which dates back centuries and contains millions of documents, will now be known as the Vatican Apostolic Archive.

The new name is a better reflection of the archive's "service to the church and the world of culture," the pontiff said.

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Your brain performs a little trick every time you turn around to look at something. Instead of presenting you with a disorienting blur of ocular input before your eyes can adjust to the new field of vision, it backfills your memory a few seconds using whatever you're looking at now.

The Code Switch Guide To Halloween

Oct 28, 2019

It's that time of year: Leaves are falling, temperatures are dropping, families are heading out to the pumpkin patch and that one neighbor is preparing to hand out raisins to kids who'd much, much rather have candy. All is well — at least until our social media feeds are flooded with the annual onslaught of racial Halloween faux pas.

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Yesterday, 11 candles were lit to remember the 11 Jewish worshippers who were killed at Pittsburgh's Tree of Life Synagogue a year ago. Lucy Perkins of member station WESA attended the memorial.

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Spiritualism In 'The In-Betweens'

Oct 27, 2019

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Roman Catholic bishops gathered at the Vatican on Saturday proposed allowing married deacons from a region of the Amazon to become ordained priests in order to help address a clergy shortage in the region.

One afternoon last month, Serikjan Bilash went to the watchdog organization he co-founded in Almaty, Kazakhstan, to celebrate the opening of its new office.

Since its founding in 2017, the organization, Atajurt Eriktileri, has publicized thousands of accounts of ethnic Kazakhs who are among the primarily Muslim minorities rounded up in detention centers in Xinjiang, China.

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President Trump said on Friday that he knows what it's like to be treated unfairly, comparing his own experience with an impeachment inquiry in Congress to inequities in the U.S. criminal justice system.

Trump was speaking at the Second Step Presidential Justice Forum held at the historically black Benedict College in South Carolina. The forum also featured Democrats vying for the presidential nomination, and was focused on the future of criminal justice policies.

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Cynthia Buckley and students / Univesity of Illinois Urbana Champaign

Nationwide, the abortion rate has been declining since the 1980s, but Illinois has recorded a smaller drop than our neighboring states.

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Call them “accidental heroes.”

Through the years, ordinary people have stepped all the way up to the Supreme Court to defend our right to speak freely.

The producers behind the new WAMU podcast, “Unprecedented,” have tracked down the main players in cases that helped us fill in the Constitutional gaps left by the Founding Fathers.

Nobody knows exactly how many fighting roosters there are in Puerto Rico. The breeders who raise them for cockfights say at least half a million. Two hundred and fifty of those live in neatly lined cages in José Torres' backyard in the mountain town of Utuado, and should the police show up to take them when cockfighting is banned at the end of this year, he has no plans to give them up.

The dispatch call from the Concord, N.H., police department is brief. A woman returning to her truck spotted a man underneath. She confronted him. The man fled. Now the woman wants a police officer to make sure her truck is OK.

"Here we go," mutters Officer Brian Cregg as he steps on the gas. In less than three minutes, he's driving across the back of a Walmart parking lot, looking for a man on the run.

October marks the start of a new flu season, with a rise in likely cases already showing up in Louisiana and other spots, federal statistics show.

The advice from federal health officials remains clear and consistent: Get the flu vaccine as soon as possible, especially if you're pregnant or have asthma or another underlying condition that makes you more likely to catch a bad case.

Lawyer Ben Crump On 'Open Season'

Oct 20, 2019

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UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #1: There were more protests in Dallas today over the fatal shooting of a black man inside his home by a white police officer...

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

Hugely popular in the 1990s, the computer-animated Christian series — featuring Bob the Tomato and Larry the Cucumber retelling Bible stories — has been rebooted on Trinity Broadcasting Network. KUER's Preach podcast has the full story of the return of VeggieTales.

Pat Nabong, special to ProPublica

A new report from a University of Illinois panel on faculty misconduct seeks a broader definition of sexual harassment and more transparency. But a university spokesperson couldn’t say when the reforms would be adopted or how much they would cost.

Black applicants to a prestigious research grant program at the National Institutes of Health are awarded funding at a significantly lower rate than their white peers. The NIH has been intensively investigating this funding gap since a 2011 report revealed the extent of the problem, looking for underlying mechanisms to use as opportunities for corrective intervention.

The Long, Strange Journey Of 'Gung-Ho'

Oct 18, 2019

Maybe you're a college freshman, emailing all of your professors before the semester starts to tell them how absolutely thrilled you are to be in their class. Or perhaps you're a world leader expressing how totally great your international trade talks are about to go.

In Richmond, Va., Garrison Coward and a campaign volunteer approach their first home, making the rounds in a mostly white neighborhood called Windsor Farms, where the sidewalks are made of brick and streets are named after English universities.

"Mr. Smallfield," the volunteer cues Coward, reading from an app on his phone.

Freepik: Roompoetliar

The US Justice System has always hung its hat on the correctional services that it provides to individuals who are indicted. However, one area that has never received the proper attention is what exactly happens to felons that have already been processed and paid their debt to society. 

In the second episode of 1619, journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones' New York Times-produced podcast, she interviews sociologist Matthew Desmond about the ways in which the institution of slavery in the United States both drove and was driven by economic concerns.

ACLU of Illinois

The Illinois Human Rights Commission, in the first case of its kind in the state, ordered a Chicago area school district to give a transgender student access to a communal boys’ restroom.

In 2015, the Komarek School in suburban North Riverside refused to let a now-12-year-old use the communal boys’ restroom, forcing him to use the male staff members’ bathroom.

The Human Rights commission ruled that was discrimination based on gender-related identity.

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The very day President Trump was sworn in — Jan. 20, 2017 — he signed an executive order instructing administration officials "to waive, defer, grant exemptions from, or delay" implementing parts of the Affordable Care Act, while Congress got ready to repeal and replace President Obama's signature health law.

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