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The U.S. Supreme Court has refused, for a second time, a Republican Party effort to block a three-day extension for counting absentee ballots in Pennsylvania. That means that at least until after the election, the court will not intervene in the way the state conducts its vote count.

The court in a second case from North Carolina, also refused late Wednesday to block a similar extension of time to count votes, an extension put into place by the state election board.

Updated at 8:25 p.m. ET

Election officials in many states say it is now too late for voters to return absentee ballots by mail and are encouraging them instead to deliver their ballots by hand or vote in person.

State rules differ about how late ballots can be received and still count. Absentee ballots must be received on Election Day in more than two dozen states, including a handful of key swing states such as Arizona, Florida, Georgia, Michigan and Wisconsin.

Miles Taylor, the former chief of staff at the Department of Homeland Security, has revealed himself to be "Anonymous," the author of a New York Times op-ed and book critical of the Trump presidency.

NPR visits one politically divided married couple in Pueblo, Colo., as they debate politics ahead of the 2020 election.

For years, human rights groups based in the U.S. have watched elections abroad, especially in places with histories of violence. This year, some are turning their attention to the U.S. election.

Following a Supreme Court decision that requires absentee ballots to arrive by the evening of Election Day, Wisconsin's parties are trying to ensure voters turn in their ballots as soon as possible.

Joe Biden's pandemic plan has seven points. He'd ask states to mandate masks. He also has detailed proposals on testing, contact tracing, creation of a public health job corps and other measures.

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How And When Are Votes Officially Counted?

4 hours ago

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As Election Day nears, the pandemic looms large. Amid a surge in new cases, the coronavirus has changed the way we live, work and — perhaps — how some Americans will vote.

As President Trump makes the case that his leadership has saved lives in the pandemic and ushered in record-fast vaccine and therapeutics development, Joe Biden has described Trump's handling of COVID-19 as "totally irresponsible" and points to American's health as the nation's top domestic issue.

Updated at 5:02 p.m. ET

When police fatally shot 27-year-old Walter Wallace in Philadelphia on Monday afternoon, the issue of police violence and how it disproportionately affects Black Americans was once again thrust into the spotlight.

Protests began nearly immediately after the news broke, with some instances of rioting as well as violence between demonstrators and the police.

Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden and his wife, Jill Biden, joined the nearly 75 million voters who have cast their ballots early.

The former vice president voted at the Carvel State Office Building in his hometown of Wilmington, Del., after delivering remarks about protecting the Affordable Care Act.

After voting, Biden spoke to reporters about his plans on health care, saying he thinks he'll be able to work with Republicans.

The CEOs of some of the biggest tech platforms defended the way they handle online speech to an audience of skeptical senators, many of whom seemed more interested in scoring political points than engaging with thorny debate over content moderation policies and algorithms.

Five people have been arrested in connection with their roles in what U.S. officials call an aggressive Chinese government operation to track down dissidents and critics of Beijing in the United States and try to repatriate them.

The defendants — Zhu Yon, Hongru Jin, Michal McMahon, Ron Jing and Zheng Congying — were arrested Wednesday morning, officials said. Three other people also facing charges are not in custody and are believed to be in China.

A Michigan judge has blocked a ban on openly carrying firearms at Michigan polling places on Election Day.

Court of Claims Judge Christopher Murray granted a preliminary injunction to pro-gun groups who filed motions to block the directive issued by Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson on Oct. 16.

Everyone in the U.S. is facing a new barrier to voting this year: COVID-19. But if you have a disability, 2020 probably isn't the first year you've faced one obstacle or another while casting your ballot.

A trio of Silicon Valley's biggest names will be in the hot seat on Wednesday for a U.S. Senate hearing focused on a decades-old legal shield that is newly under fire.

Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg, Twitter's Jack Dorsey and Google's Sundar Pichai are appearing virtually at 10 a.m. ET in front of the Republican-controlled Senate Commerce Committee to answer questions under oath about whether being insulated from lawsuits has enabled Big Tech's "bad behavior."

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The Biden and Trump campaigns have at least one thing in common - they're not sure you should trust the polling data. They don't want the numbers to keep potential voters home.

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It just makes sense - doesn't it? - that in this election season, in these final days, social media companies would be front and center in the conversation.

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The presidential campaign is in high gear in the final week before voting concludes. And both campaigns are trying to expand the map. President Trump is traveling to many states. Just yesterday, he was in Michigan, Nebraska and Wisconsin.

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When President Trump was released from the hospital after being treated for COVID-19, he had a prescription for how Americans could handle the coronavirus.

"Don't let it dominate you. Don't be afraid of it," he said in a video from the White House. The apparent idea: that the coronavirus, which has killed at least 225,000 people in the U.S., could be wrestled into submission.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., leads a 232 to 197 Democratic majority in the House heading into the election. There are five current vacancies and one
Libertarian, former Republican, Justin Amash, R-Mich., who left the party in 2019 in a clash over his plan to vote to impeach President Trump.

If you find yourself fighting with a friend over politics, or frustrated and furious with your nearest and dearest over whom they're supporting for president, you're hardly alone. A recent survey shows just how much the nation's bitter political divide is causing social splintering and taking a toll on friendships. Even decades-long relationships have been caving under the pressure, giving new meaning to "social distancing."

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OK. Here's a new term - fundraging (ph). It is when someone channels their emotions into their political donations. In 2020, Democrats have taken fundraging to historic new levels, as NPR's Susan Davis reports.

SUSAN DAVIS, BYLINE: If 2008 was about hope and change for Democrats, 2020 is about anger and fear.

BARBARA RAVAGE: I'm terrified. And if I were not as old as I am, I'd be out on the streets.

DAVIS: The pandemic has kept 75-year-old Barbara Ravage away from volunteering in person this year, so she's been giving money instead.

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