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Democrats Divided In Colorado Senate Race

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Farmers in the rural Midwest say they are struggling because of President Trump's ongoing trade war and a recent decision the president made on renewable fuels made from corn and soybeans that benefits the oil industry.

"We're tightening our belt," farmer Aaron Lehman says while driving his tractor down a rural road near his farm north of Des Moines, Iowa. "We're talking to our lenders, our landlords [and] our input suppliers."

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News organizations now refer to President Trump's whoppers — from the size of his inaugural crowds to a hurricane threatening Alabama — as routinely as referring to rain in Seattle.

Week In Politics

Sep 14, 2019

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Democratic presidential candidates debate again. Meanwhile, their colleagues in the House inch toward the I word. Ixora? It's a tropical plant. I looked it up. And the president tells John Bolton that he's just tired of quarrelling. NPR's Ron Elving joins us. Ron, thanks for being with us.

There was something different about the Democratic debate this week, compared with the earlier rounds this summer. Something was happening that was hard to pin down, but it was palpable. Not the contrast of night and day, but perhaps the difference between dusk and dawn.

It's a critical difference, and it comes at a crucial time. Because the Trump presidency these candidates are competing to truncate has reached what may be a critical juncture. But more of that in a moment.

Updated at 5:58 p.m. ET

Latinx community groups based in Texas and Arizona are suing to block the Trump administration from collecting government records for the production of data concerning the U.S. citizenship status of every person living in the country.

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Friday News Roundup - International

Sep 13, 2019

With guest host Todd Zwillich.

In the northern Bahamas, 2,500 people are still missing in the wake of Hurricane Dorian. The Catagory 5 storm left at least 50 people dead. The death toll is expected to rise.

Friday News Roundup - Domestic

Sep 13, 2019

With guest host Todd Zwillich.

We round up the week’s top news from around the country.

Former South Carolina Gov. Mark Sanford announced he will challenge President Donald Trump in the 2020 Republican primaries.

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Regulate us. That's the unexpected message from one of the country's leading tech executives. Microsoft President Brad Smith argues that governments need to put some "guardrails" around engineers and the tech titans they serve.

If public leaders don't, he says, the Internet giants will cannibalize the very fabric of this country.

"We need to work together; we need to work with governments to protect, frankly, something that is far more important than technology: democracy. It was here before us. It needs to be here and healthy after us," Smith says.

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Put 10 Democratic presidential candidates on a single stage and you challenge all of them to say why they are unique.

(SOUNDBITE OF MONTAGE)

BERNIE SANDERS: I am the only person up here...

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Well, we finally got to see all the leading Democratic presidential candidates on the same stage together last night at a debate in Houston. The question is whether that made the choices any clearer for voters. Let's give a listen.

(SOUNDBITE OF MONTAGE)

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But what did some voters think last night? Viewers across the country included Noah Taylor (ph) of Virginia, who is 19. He supports Elizabeth Warren, but Julian Castro caught his eye.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Heading into Thursday's Democratic presidential debate, the third this campaign season, we had five political questions.

Here are those questions and how they got answered:

Once again, health care took up a large chunk of a Democratic primary debate. Once again, there were fights over costs, coverage and whether the party is growing too extreme.

But this time, all of the front-runners were onstage together, providing the first opportunity for all of them to take direct aim at each other and their vastly differing health care plans. It made for some heated exchanges, putting "Medicare for All" supporters on defense. But it also showed clearly that some candidates are cautious not to criticize others' proposals too harshly.

Former Texas Rep. Beto O'Rourke gave a staunch defense of his gun control plan during Thursday's Democratic presidential primary debate, saying that as president, he would prioritize mandatory buybacks of assault-style weapons.

Quoting the candidate's past comment about selling back AR-15s and AK-47s, moderator David Muir asked O'Rourke: "Are you proposing taking away their guns? And how would this work?"

O'Rourke answered, "Hell, yes, we're going to take your AR-15, your AK-47."

Here's more of what he said:

The fate of the filibuster — a 60-vote threshold for most legislation in the U.S. Senate — is again an issue of controversy among Democratic presidential candidates.

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren said the supermajority requirement is preventing Congress from passing popular bills — such as a background check bill.

More than 16 years after the U.S. invasion of Iraq, former Vice President Joe Biden is still struggling to explain his vote for the war and when his feelings about intervention evolved.

On Thursday night, during the third Democratic debate, which took place in Houston, Biden said he "never should have voted to give [President] Bush the authority to go in and do what he said he was going to do."

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September's Democratic presidential debate has been narrowed to one night only, as more candidates have called it quits altogether.

Attorneys for Virginia's Democratic lieutenant governor, Justin Fairfax, filed a $400 million defamation lawsuit against CBS on Thursday, accusing the network of amplifying sexual assault claims that Fairfax says are "false, defamatory and politically-motivated."

The lawsuit centers on CBS This Morning's airing of two interviews with Meredith Watson and Vanessa Tyson, who in February accused Fairfax of separate incidents of sexual assault.

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