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Jim Lehrer, the veteran journalist and writer known for his steady, low-key presence in the often noisy world of TV news, died Thursday. He co-founded PBS' NewsHour and won numerous honors — including Peabody and Emmy awards and a National Humanities Medal — in a career that spanned some 50 years.

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The Trump administration has announced new visa restrictions to a bid to stop pregnant women from coming to the U.S. for purpose of giving birth to new American citizens.

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The U.S. government says it's on high alert for cyberattacks from foreign countries in this election year. Yet private cybersecurity firms have often been the ones sounding the alarm, and in some cases, they are selling their services to the U.S. intelligence community.

"We've seen Iran impersonating political candidates," said Sandra Joyce, the head of global intelligence at FireEye, a leading cybersecurity company.

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This is FRESH AIR. I'm Dave Davies in for Terry Gross, who's off this week. President Trump fired his first attorney general, Jeff Sessions, after complaining that Sessions had failed to protect him from a special counsel investigation. In his replacement, current Attorney General William Barr, Trump has a fierce advocate.

Updated at 6:21 p.m. ET

House impeachment managers are resuming their prosecution of President Trump in the Senate on Thursday, outlining how the law applies to what they see as the president's "corrupt scheme" with Ukraine to tilt the 2020 election in his favor.

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To Adam Schiff, the lead impeachment manager in the Senate trial against President Trump, the case boils down to this.

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Let's just say it - our elections in the United States remain vulnerable. That's what Shelby Pierson, the head of election security for the U.S. intelligence community, said on our program yesterday.

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Two United Nations officials say they believe that Saudi Arabia's Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman ordered the hack of a smartphone that belongs to Jeff Bezos. They say it happened in May of 2018.

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We're heading into the second day of opening statements in President Trump's impeachment trial. Yesterday, Democratic House managers began walking senators through their arguments.

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On Jan. 24, 1966, Sen. Everett Dirksen of Illinois was thirsty on the Senate floor.

And so, for a moment, he put aside debate on labor law and asked the presiding officer of the chamber a question, his signature brawny bass voice amplifying its importance: Could he have a Senate page fetch him a generous helping of milk?

Updated at 9:49 p.m. ET

The matter before the Senate isn't just President Trump's conduct; it is no less than the fate of the Constitution and America's role in the world, House managers said on Wednesday.

With the ground rules having been settled in the early hours after sometimes-bitter litigation between the House delegation and Trump's legal team, senators returned Wednesday afternoon to hear the formal opening of the case.

Democrats are going first with 24 hours over three days to present their arguments for removing Trump from office.

Utah has become the 19th — and most conservative — state in the U.S. to ban "conversion therapy" for minors. The widely discredited practice, aimed at changing a patient's sexual orientation or gender identity, is now formally barred in the state after the new rule took effect late Tuesday.

A spokesperson for Republican Gov. Gary Herbert, who directed licensing regulators to make the change, confirmed the move to NPR on Wednesday.

Former Vice President Joe Biden is defending his record on Social Security, amid increased criticism from the campaign of Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, which has repeatedly pointed to Biden's willingness as a U.S. senator to back spending freezes for Social Security and other entitlement programs.

The candidates' back-and-forth culminated — as most disputes in modern presidential campaigns do — in dueling Twitter posts Tuesday night.

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As the U.S. Senate solemnly considers the fate of a president, Twitter has been somewhat less solemn, considering another question. Can you drink milk on the Senate floor?

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Amtrak has announced that it will change a policy that brought it a lot of criticism. It's dumping a new rule that led to two people who use wheelchairs being told they would have to pay $25,000 for a train ticket that usually costs just 16. NPR broke this story last week. Here's Joseph Shapiro from the NPR Investigations Unit with an update.

JOSEPH SHAPIRO, BYLINE: A spokesman, Marc Magliari, said Amtrak will end the policy that led to that big bill.

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Amtrak has announced that it will change a policy that brought it a lot of criticism. It's dumping a new rule that led to two people who use wheelchairs being told they would have to pay $25,000 for a train ticket that usually costs just 16. NPR broke this story last week. Here's Joseph Shapiro from the NPR Investigations Unit with an update.

JOSEPH SHAPIRO, BYLINE: A spokesman, Marc Magliari, said Amtrak will end the policy that led to that big bill.

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It was Day Two of the House managers' opening arguments in another Senate impeachment trial 21 years ago. Bob Barr, a Georgia House Republican,
was speaking in the well of the Senate, making a case for removing President Bill Clinton from office.

"We urge you, the distinguished jurors in this case," Barr said to the assembled senators, "not to be fooled."

Updated at 6:17 p.m. ET

The District of Columbia is suing President Trump's inaugural committee, the Trump Organization and the Trump International Hotel in Washington, accusing them of "grossly overpaying" for event space at the hotel to enrich the president's family during the 2017 inauguration.

Even though the ceremonial opening of the impeachment trial took place last week, the Senate convened on Tuesday to begin its proceedings in earnest.

First, Senators debated the rules and procedures of the trial. The Democratic House impeachment managers are expected to start making their case in the Senate on Wednesday.

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