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New documents out tonight provide new details about what Michael Cohen, the president's former attorney, told Congress behind closed doors this March. Cohen already admitted publicly that he misled Congress about the timing of a Trump Tower project in Moscow. He is currently in federal prison serving a three-year sentence. Tonight's revelations have to do with who Cohen says told him to lie and why.

NPR's Tim Mak joins us now from Capitol Hill with details. Hey, Tim.

TIM MAK, BYLINE: Hey there.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

New documents out tonight provide new details about what Michael Cohen, the president's former attorney, told Congress behind closed doors this March. Cohen already admitted publicly that he misled Congress about the timing of a Trump Tower project in Moscow. He is currently in federal prison serving a three-year sentence. Tonight's revelations have to do with who Cohen says told him to lie and why.

NPR's Tim Mak joins us now from Capitol Hill with details. Hey, Tim.

TIM MAK, BYLINE: Hey there.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

New documents out tonight provide new details about what Michael Cohen, the president's former attorney, told Congress behind closed doors this March. Cohen already admitted publicly that he misled Congress about the timing of a Trump Tower project in Moscow. He is currently in federal prison serving a three-year sentence. Tonight's revelations have to do with who Cohen says told him to lie and why.

NPR's Tim Mak joins us now from Capitol Hill with details. Hey, Tim.

TIM MAK, BYLINE: Hey there.

Updated at 7:09 p.m. ET

A federal judge ruled against President Trump on Monday in a subpoena dispute not long after the White House said it is seeking to block its former top lawyer from talking to Congress.

The events amounted to a win — and a loss — apiece for Republicans and Democrats in their ongoing high-stakes legal and political war over separation of powers and oversight in the aftermath of special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation.

The McGahn matter

A Conversation With Senator Tom Cotton

10 hours ago

Arkansas Senator Tom Cotton wrote a book.

But he’s not running for president (as far as we know.)

Politico describes the book as “apolitical,” and it follows the U.S. 3rd Infantry Regiment, a unit which Cotton was a platoon leader in 2007-2008. That regiment is called the Old Guard, which carries out funerals for soldiers at Arlington National Cemetery.

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Tony Horwitz has spent the last two years in the South, embracing what he calls “bar-stool democracy.”

It’s the premise of his new book, Spying on the South: An Odyssey Across the American Divide, which catalogs his journey as he retraces the footsteps of journalist-turned-landscape-architect Frederick Law Olmsted.

The Latest Legislation In Alabama

10 hours ago

Abortion is still legal in all 50 states. But with the passage of a highly restrictive new law in Alabama, and with a bill in Missouri close behind, some are wondering about the future of the procedure.

This year, the largest percentage of Australians since 2006 agreed with the following statement: “global warming is a serious and pressing problem. We should begin taking steps now even if this involves significant cost.”

Journalists and pundits alike believed that this sentiment would affect this weekend’s elections and that Australians might overwhelmingly select a party with the most aggressive approach toward climate change.

But that’s not what happened.

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The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of Native American rights in a 5-4 decision in a case out of Wyoming. Justice Neil Gorsuch, the only Westerner on the court, provided the decisive vote in this case, showing himself again to be sensitive to Native American rights.

Updated at 1:10 p.m. ET

Lori Lightfoot officially became Chicago's first black female and openly gay mayor on Monday. She immediately laid out a four-point plan for safety, education, stability and integrity during her 40-minute inauguration speech.

From student loan debt to unaffordable housing to the opioid crisis, Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren has developed a reputation for having a policy plan for everything.

Bob Best enthusiastically supports President Trump's tough policies against China and other countries.

"I'm not a big tariff guy. I'm a free trade guy," says Best, who manages a heating and air conditioning company in Kennesaw, Ga.

"But sometimes when the bully just doesn't listen, you've got to punch him in the mouth. And that's what he's doing."

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President Trump's account on the U.S. Golf Association system has been hacked in an apparent attempt to make him look like a bad golfer with four fake scores.

The awful scores of 101, 100, 108 and 102 were posted to Trump's USGA-administered Golf Handicap and Information Network [GHIN] handicap system on Friday, according to Golfweek. A handicap is a measure of a golfer's ability – a lower handicap indicates a better golf game.

It's not a message for everyone — even though that's exactly what it's intended to be.

Many Democrats are angry. They're angry with President Trump's election and what it represents. And they're angry about the direction of the country, and the inequities in American life.

So it would make sense that the person running for the Democratic nomination for president would channel that anger. President Trump did it to win over the Republican base in 2016, saying he gladly carries the "mantle of anger."

Not Joe Biden.

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Student Journalist Lands A National Scoop

May 19, 2019

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Sunday Politics

May 19, 2019

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Congress has yet to hear the testimony of special counsel Robert Mueller or former White House counsel Don McGahn. The treasury secretary, Steve Mnuchin, just rejected the subpoena demanding Trump's tax returns. And now Democrats are weighing how to respond.

Pete Buttigieg isn't giving President Trump much credit for saying the South Bend, Ind., mayor's marriage to a man is "absolutely fine" and "good."

"That's nice," Buttigieg said dismissively in an interview on Friday with the NPR Politics Podcast and Iowa Public Radio. "I'm more interested in policies that affect LGBTQ people."

Updated May 20 at 10:38 a.m. ET

Some critics of the citizenship question the Trump administration wants to add to the 2020 census are coming from a group that tends to stay away from politically heated issues — business leaders.

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Updated at 3:15 p.m. ET

Austria's vice chancellor has resigned after German media published a video that purportedly showed him offering government contracts to a woman posing as the niece of a Russian oligarch, in exchange for media coverage and political funding.

The scandal drove Chancellor Sebastian Kurz to call for snap elections instead of trying to revive his weakened coalition government. "Enough is enough," he told reporters on Saturday in Vienna.

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