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State Week
Fridays 12:30-1 p.m., 7:30-8 p.m.; Saturdays 6:30-7 a.m.

State Week has been produced by NPR Illinois since January 1975, created by original WSSR News Director Rich Bradley when the station went on the air. It is the longest running public affairs program on NPR Illinois and was patterned after the popular PBS show Washington Week in Review.

Sean Crawfordthe NPR Illinois News Director and former Statehouse Bureau Chief, moderates the program.  He is joined by a regular panel consisting of Charlie Wheeler, retired director of the Public Affairs Reporting Program at UIS, and reporters from throughout Illinois. The program provides analysis and commentary on the top news stories of the week in Illinois state government and politics.

State Week is made available to all public radio stations in Illinois and is also available as a podcast.

  • Listen on-demand below.

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Send a question or comment to engage@nprillinois.org 

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  • The Illinois Senate this week approved the state's new energy package and the governor quickly signed it into law. It saves a pair of nuclear plants, and the jobs and tax base they provide, along with placing Illinois on a path to a renewable energy future. It also shined light on how the leaders of the state can work through complicated issues to reach a deal. Our panel also discusses the current situation with COVID-19, as a vaccine mandate is set to take effect.
  • The Illinois Senate this week approved the state's new energy package and the governor quickly signed it into law. It saves a pair of nuclear plants, and the jobs and tax base they provide, along with placing Illinois on a path to a renewable energy future. It also shined light on how the leaders of the state can work through complicated issues to reach a deal. Our panel also discusses the current situation with COVID-19, as a vaccine mandate is set to take effect.
  • The State of Illinois is overhauling its energy policy, shifting to more renewable sources in the decades to come. Month of negotiations resulted in a breakthrough this week that will keep open nuclear plants in the near term, saving jobs. Coal fired power plants will be phased out before the middle of century.
  • The Illinois General Assembly was back in Springfield for a rare late August session to tackle a couple of key issues. Democrats approved a new version of the legislative redistricting map, over objections of Republicans and various interest groups. But an energy package that has been negotiated for months remains elusive.
  • The Illinois General Assembly was back in Springfield for a rare late August session to tackle a couple of key issues. Democrats approved a new version of the legislative redistricting map, over objections of Republicans and various interest groups. But an energy package that has been negotiated for months remains elusive.
  • Amid the surge in COVID-19 cases brought on by the Delta variant, Gov. J.B. Pritzker this week stepped up mitigations.
  • It's a summer tradition for the state's political parties to rally at the Illinois State Fair in Springfield. It's also an opportunity to size up each party's chances heading into statewide elections in 2022.
  • With students returning to classrooms, the Illinois State Board of Education moved to strip a suburban private school that had planned to ignore the new mask requirement of its recognition status.
  • Gov. J.B. Pritzker said the rise of COVID cases caused by the Delta variant necessitated his decision to require everyone in school buildings to wear a mask. He also called for some frontline state workers to be vaccinated by this fall. Both moves have brought a mixed response.Pritzker also wants an energy package approved, but there's still no deal after months of negotiations. We discuss it all on State Week.
  • We discuss concerns about the Delta variant as cases rise. The governor announced masks must be worn by all individuals in state facilities. Also, schools are trying to determine the best approach with classes set to begin in a few weeks. Republican Congressman Adam Kinzinger was on the national stage as hearings into the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol got underway. What does his participation mean for his political future?