Adrian Florido

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

In today's program, we are hearing from Americans across the country. And so we turn now to NPR national correspondent Adrian Florido, who is in Los Angeles, a Democratic stronghold and also the home of Vice President Harris.

Hi, Adrian.

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Pedro Pierluisi was sworn in as Puerto Rico's 12th elected governor on Saturday, promising to turn the page on years of social and political turbulence in the U.S. territory and to restore trust in a government whose credibility has been badly damaged by its response to a string of recent crises.

Speaking from the steps of the island's Capitol, the new governor addressed a reduced crowd of a few hundred invited guests who wore face coverings and sat in chairs spaced out as a precaution against the coronavirus.

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When he delivered his victory speech earlier this month, President-elect Joe Biden made clear that, more than anyone else, it was Black voters who saved his once-struggling campaign and delivered him the presidency.

Updated at 6:32 p.m. ET

For nearly four days, tension mounted in American households as an anxious nation awaited the results of the presidential election. But in an instant on Saturday, that tension washed away.

It took only seconds after Joe Biden was declared the winner over President Trump for a divided country's relief, frustration, anger and joy over the outcome to begin spilling into the streets.

Alondra Llompart was 8 years old when Puerto Rico entered the economic recession from which it is still struggling to emerge. She's 22 now, so for most of her life she's watched the island's infrastructure crumble and endured an unending string of goodbyes to people leaving the island in search of work.

"Most of my family, unfortunately — to Florida, or Texas," Llompart said. "So you're just kind of trying to hold on to the few people that do stay, and hope that they never leave. And it just is really sad."

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Fires burning up and down the west coast are causing poor air quality and choking some communities. NPR's Adrian Florido reports from a neighborhood here in Los Angeles that has been covered in ash and smoke.

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Anti-Black racism had always bothered John Collins, but he'd never personally done anything about it.

That changed after police killed George Floyd in May.

Stuck at home and furloughed from work because of the pandemic, Collins had time to watch coverage of the protests Floyd's death had set off and to reflect on the nation's history of racial injustice.

Puerto Rico Gov. Wanda Vázquez acknowledged defeat in a primary election Sunday to former Puerto Rico congressional representative Pedro Pierluisi.

Though votes were still being tabulated Sunday night, results showed Pierluisi with a commanding lead in polls. It was the second day of voting in what had turned out to be a chaotic primary election in Puerto Rico. Voting last Sunday was suspended after election officials failed to deliver ballots to polling places across the island.

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When, on June 7, nine members of the Minneapolis City Council went onstage at a rally organized by Black activists and took turns reading a pledge to dismantle their city's police department, many in the crowd at Powderhorn Park let out not just cheers, but full-throated screams.

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And let's go to Minneapolis now, where we've got NPR's Adrian Florido. Adrian, good morning.

ADRIAN FLORIDO, BYLINE: Good morning, Lulu.

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Protests over the alleged murder of George Floyd at the hands of police in Minneapolis have spread far beyond Minnesota. In Washington, D.C., a tense standoff at the gates of the White House.

(SOUNDBITE OF PROTEST)

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It hadn't been easy, but before the pandemic Elia Gonzalez had always managed to keep her family fed by stretching her food stamps and her partner's modest income as a D.J. at bars around Puerto Rico's capital, San Juan. That changed in mid-March, when those bars closed and her daughter's school, where she'd gotten free breakfast and lunch, did too.

Updated: 10:40 p.m. EST

A well-known advocate for the poor in Puerto Rico was released from jail Thursday evening after a San Juan judge dismissed charges stemming from his arrest earlier in the day during a protest against the island government's response to the coronavirus crisis.

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Local lawmakers in San Francisco have given the mayor 12 days to secure 7,000 hotel rooms to house the city's homeless population during the coronavirus emergency, plus another 1,250 rooms for frontline workers.

The emergency ordinance passed by the San Francisco Board of Supervisors requires Mayor London Breed to secure the rooms by April 26 and asks her to use emergency powers to commandeer the rooms if she is unable to reach deals with hotel owners.

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