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Political news

Updated at 1:50 p.m. ET Friday

In the 20 months since he left the White House, Barack Obama has been pretty quiet, but that is starting to change.

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Confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh have been marked by delays and protesters' interruptions all this week. Today - more chaos and a rebellion.

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After 10 other Seeking Solutions forums across the state, NPR Illinois and AARP are bringing the final forum to the Union League Club in Chicago, IL. Panelists will discuss the major issues of the 2018 gubernatorial election such as the struggles faced by higher education, a loss of population in the state, and the changing needs of the Illinois workforce. 

Updated at 5:55 p.m. ET

House Speaker Paul Ryan called on the author of the widely read New York Times op-ed critical of President Trump to resign, arguing that the individual was "living in dishonesty."

The essay, posted Wednesday afternoon and attributed to a senior administration official, suggested that there is a group of high-level Trump administration officials working to stymie the president behind the scenes.

Updated at 6:09 p.m. ET

The Justice Department announced charges Thursday against a North Korean man in connection with a series of infamous cyberattacks, including the 2014 hack of Sony Pictures Entertainment and the WannaCry ransomware that paralyzed computers across the globe.

Park Jin Hyok was part of a hacking group that conducted some of the most destructive recent online attacks in the world, according to a criminal complaint unsealed Thursday.

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Updated at 3:45 p.m. ET

The Trump administration is proposing to lift court-imposed limits on how long it can hold children in immigration detention.

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Ahead of the 2018 midterm elections, NPR's Morning Edition wants to connect with women who voted for President Trump in 2016. Share your story with us.

A producer may reach out to you to follow up on your response. Share your thoughts with us below or here.

Are you a woman who voted for President Trump?

Updated at 10:55 p.m. ET

Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh weathered another long day of questions from the Senate Judiciary Committee Thursday.

He was pressed once again for his views on presidential power.

Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., sought a promise from Kavanaugh that he would be willing to serve as a check on the president who nominated him.

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BRETT KAVANAUGH: I base my decisions on the law, but I do so with an awareness of the facts and an awareness of the real-world consequences. And I've not lived in a bubble.

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Former Trump Staffer On 'NYT' Op-Ed

Sep 6, 2018

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How would Brett Kavanaugh consider cases before him on the Supreme Court?

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Having watched Capitol Hill for more than 30 years, I have now seen Senate confirmation hearings for an even dozen nominees to the Supreme Court. Some have had moments of high drama. All have had an air of meaning and consequence.

Until this week.

Updated at 2:50 p.m. ET

Celebrations by India's LGBTQ community stretched into the night Thursday, after the country's Supreme Court struck down a long-standing ban on gay sex in a unanimous decision that marks a watershed in the socially conservative country of 1.3 billion people.

It is a landmark ruling in a nation where attitudes about gays and lesbians are beginning to change — and the decision points to more questions of how India will extend equal protections to the LGBTQ community.

Missouri Rep. Billy Long left behind a career as an auctioneer when he took up his post in Congress in 2011.

Nevertheless, old habits die hard. In the midst of a hearing with Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey before the House Energy and Commerce Committee, Long employed his auctioneering skills to drown out a vociferous protester.

Updated September 6

In the lawsuits over the hotly contested 2020 census citizenship question, attorneys for the plaintiffs are facing a memory problem.

Wednesday was Day 2 of the Supreme Court confirmation hearings for Judge Brett Kavanaugh and it gave members of the Senate Judiciary Committee a chance to question the Trump nominee publicly and one-on-one. There were more protests, and much talk of precedent.

Here are some of the highlights:

1. More protests

Updated at 8:39 p.m. ET

Another surreal twist in the midst of another frenetic week has brought an unexpected question to the top of the conversation in Washington, D.C.

What is the 25th Amendment?

The short answer: It's a way, other than impeachment, provided by the Constitution for power to be taken away from a sitting president.

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To talk more about what this lawsuit could mean for health care, we turn to Julie Rovner, chief Washington correspondent for Kaiser Health News. Good to see you, Julie.

JULIE ROVNER: Nice to see you, Ari.

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Democrat Sheldon Whitehouse, of Rhode Island, is on of the senators who quizzed the nominee today. Senator Whitehouse, welcome to the program.

SHELDON WHITEHOUSE: Thank you. Good to be with you.

The White House slammed a newspaper essay on Wednesday attributed to an anonymous administration official that criticized President Trump and suggested that aides have discussed ways to try to remove him from office.

Trump and others blasted The New York Times after the newspaper ran what it said was a column written by someone within the president's administration who called into question his judgment and vowed to block some of his wishes.

In a highly unusual situation, the author was identified only as "a senior official in the Trump administration."

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