slavery

outside of house
Courtesy of Byron Hetzler/Southern Illinoisan

One of the oldest buildings remaining in southern Illinois is home to a lot of history.  It’s called the Crenshaw House, because it was owned by John Crenshaw, who made his money running salt mines. 

But it’s probably better known as the Old Slave House.  For decades, the house - in Gallatin County ironically near a community called Equality - was privately owned and open for public tours.  Stories that slaves had been held captive inside were passed along. 

facebook.com/pg/bikeforcomfortwomen

Activists from South Korea are bicycling through Illinois as part of a journey meant to draw attention to certain victims of war crimes.

The Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum

Because Illinois is a northern state and the former home of Abraham Lincoln, it isn’t typically associated with slavery. But there was slavery in Illinois for more than 100 years.

Even after Illinois entered the Union, loopholes in its laws allowed the practice to continue, making the future Land of Lincoln a quasi-slave state. 

This Sunday is the 150th anniversary of the ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. The amendment banned slavery in America. 

To commemorate the event, The Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum will display a copy of the amendment signed by Lincoln. 

We often think about the 1800's as a backward period,  an era of slavery and war.   But Brenda Wineapple wants you to take a different view.   She'll speak in Springfield this week.

greatriverroad.com

Illinois' lieutenant governor is seeking clemency for Illinois abolitionists convicted for fighting slavery.  
The Carbondale Democrat's office is working with historians and experts to identify men and women around Illinois who were convicted of violating slavery laws.  
Slavery was abolished in Illinois in 1824, but laws prohibited people from harboring or helping slaves.