All Things Considered

Weekdays 4 -6:30 p.m., Mondays-Thursdays 7-8 p.m., Fridays 7-7:30 p.m.

On May 3, 1971, at 4 PM central, All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40+ years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

SCROLL DOWN FOR LATEST SHOW STORIES

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country.  In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, 4-5 PM.  Michel Martin hosts on the weekends.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world, along with reports from NPR Illinois journalists. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. 

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

 

When Gordon Sondland arrived at the Capitol last month to provide what would be pivotal testimony in the Trump impeachment inquiry, a reporter asked the U.S. ambassador to the European Union, "Are you here to salvage your reputation?"

"I don't have a reputation to salvage," Sondland shot back.

Until recently, Sondland, 62, had a pretty low profile outside his hometown of Portland, Ore., where he and his wife, Katy Durant, are big Republican donors and contributors to numerous arts and civic organizations.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

As public impeachment hearings continue, let's look ahead to tomorrow's witness. It's the U.S. ambassador to the European Union, Gordon Sondland. President Trump gave Sondland an unusual role in Ukraine policy. As part of it, Sondland urged Ukrainian officials to launch investigations so that military aid could flow. Like Trump himself, Sondland is a real estate developer who gravitated towards politics. As NPR's Jim Zarroli reports, he wasn't always a fan of the president.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

As public impeachment hearings continue, let's look ahead to tomorrow's witness. It's the U.S. ambassador to the European Union, Gordon Sondland. President Trump gave Sondland an unusual role in Ukraine policy. As part of it, Sondland urged Ukrainian officials to launch investigations so that military aid could flow. Like Trump himself, Sondland is a real estate developer who gravitated towards politics. As NPR's Jim Zarroli reports, he wasn't always a fan of the president.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

Two teachers from the American University in Kabul were freed by the Taliban today. Kevin King and Timothy Weeks were abducted more than three years ago. The Afghan government freed three high-profile Taliban members in exchange for their release. NPR Pentagon correspondent Tom Bowman joins us now. Hey, Tom.

TOM BOWMAN, BYLINE: Hey, Ailsa.

CHANG: So can you first just tell us a little more about who Kevin King and Tim Weeks are?

Copyright 2019 WPLN. To see more, visit WPLN.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

OK. Let's hear now from Americans, in their own words, about the impeachment inquiry into President Trump. Sergio Martinez-Beltran of member station WPLN has been asking people in Tennessee for their thoughts.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

As public impeachment hearings continue, let's look ahead to tomorrow's witness. It's the U.S. ambassador to the European Union, Gordon Sondland. President Trump gave Sondland an unusual role in Ukraine policy. As part of it, Sondland urged Ukrainian officials to launch investigations so that military aid could flow. Like Trump himself, Sondland is a real estate developer who gravitated towards politics. As NPR's Jim Zarroli reports, he wasn't always a fan of the president.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Susannah Cahalan had all the symptoms of a severe mental illness.

SUSANNAH CAHALAN: I was hallucinating. I was paranoid. I was actively psychotic.

SHAPIRO: What she didn't have was a mental illness. Cahalan actually had an autoimmune disease that caused inflammation of the brain. She wrote about the experience of being misdiagnosed and her eventual recovery in her 2012 memoir.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Susannah Cahalan had all the symptoms of a severe mental illness.

SUSANNAH CAHALAN: I was hallucinating. I was paranoid. I was actively psychotic.

SHAPIRO: What she didn't have was a mental illness. Cahalan actually had an autoimmune disease that caused inflammation of the brain. She wrote about the experience of being misdiagnosed and her eventual recovery in her 2012 memoir.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Susannah Cahalan had all the symptoms of a severe mental illness.

SUSANNAH CAHALAN: I was hallucinating. I was paranoid. I was actively psychotic.

SHAPIRO: What she didn't have was a mental illness. Cahalan actually had an autoimmune disease that caused inflammation of the brain. She wrote about the experience of being misdiagnosed and her eventual recovery in her 2012 memoir.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Susannah Cahalan had all the symptoms of a severe mental illness.

SUSANNAH CAHALAN: I was hallucinating. I was paranoid. I was actively psychotic.

SHAPIRO: What she didn't have was a mental illness. Cahalan actually had an autoimmune disease that caused inflammation of the brain. She wrote about the experience of being misdiagnosed and her eventual recovery in her 2012 memoir.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

The State Of Spanish-Language Media In U.S.

Nov 17, 2019

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This week, Tribune Publishing announced it would be closing its Chicago-based Spanish-language weekly newspaper, Hoy. The paper was launched in 2003 to serve the city's Spanish-speaking and bilingual communities.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

First, we're going to talk about an event on the campus of Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill., that's caused an uproar. Not so much about what happened during the event but about how student news organizations decided to cover it.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

When Carrie Goldberg broke up with her boyfriend of a few months, frightening things started happening. He sent her hundreds of threatening messages. He contacted her friends, family and even work colleagues on Facebook to spread vicious lies about her — and that wasn't all. One night she opened her laptop to find email after email containing intimate pictures of her, including a graphic video filmed without her consent. Goldberg, a lawyer, went to the police and was told there was nothing that could be done.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Mija means my daughter in Spanish. And it's also the title of a podcast that tells the stories of one immigrant family with a home in Queens, N.Y., but with roots in Colombia. The stories are told by the daughter in the family.

(SOUNDBITE OF PODCAST, "MIJA")

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Gubernatorial wasn't a word I thought much about until I started editing pieces about gubernatorial elections.

In fact, there's a gubernatorial election in Louisiana on Saturday between the only Democratic governor in the deep South and his Republican challenger, a wealthy Trump-backed businessman.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

And for more on that aide that we just heard Michele Kelemen mention - his name is David Holmes. I want to now bring in Dan Feldman. He's a former State Department official who worked with Holmes in Afghanistan and Pakistan.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

In her testimony today, former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch offered a glimpse of what it's like to be a U.S. diplomat at this moment in history.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

President Trump often says members of the "deep state" are bent on sabotaging his agenda.

And some of the career civil servants the president is referring to have said they have been retaliated against following reports in conservative media questioning their loyalty to Trump.

Updated at 8:29 p.m. ET

Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, is doubling down on his defense of President Trump as well as Rudy Giuliani's role in the Ukraine controversy amid the impeachment inquiry.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

President Trump often says a, quote, "deep state" is trying to bring him down, and some career civil servants have said they've been retaliated against after conservative media questioned their loyalty to Trump. Well, today the State Department's inspector general found that this actually happened to one high-ranking foreign policy official. And for more on this, we are joined by NPR's Bobby Allyn here in the studio.

Hi, Bobby.

BOBBY ALLYN, BYLINE: Hey, Ari.

SHAPIRO: What specifically was the inspector general looking into here?

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

President Trump often says a, quote, "deep state" is trying to bring him down, and some career civil servants have said they've been retaliated against after conservative media questioned their loyalty to Trump. Well, today the State Department's inspector general found that this actually happened to one high-ranking foreign policy official. And for more on this, we are joined by NPR's Bobby Allyn here in the studio.

Hi, Bobby.

BOBBY ALLYN, BYLINE: Hey, Ari.

SHAPIRO: What specifically was the inspector general looking into here?

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Millions of Americans tuned into yesterday's impeachment hearings. The buildup was intense, a promised collision of spectacle and substance. NPR's David Folkenflik explains viewers were instead treated to an old-fashioned civics lesson.

Pages