West: Coronavirus-Related Restrictions By State

May 11, 2020
Originally published on January 4, 2021 2:55 pm

NPR is tracking coronavirus-related developments in all 50 states, Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia so you can read up on your state's COVID-19 response and how it compares to others. This rundown focuses on statewide measures — local jurisdictions may vary.

This is part of a series about coronavirus-related restrictions across the United States.

Jump to a state: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming, other states


Alaska

What's the big picture?

  • Alaska has been in simultaneous "Phase 3/4" of its reopening plan since May, when it allowed businesses, activities and other venues to resume operations. Outbreak health orders issued in mid-November outline precautions and procedures for travel and critical infrastructure jobs.
  • There is no statewide mask mandate, but health department guidance urges people to wear masks whenever they are near non-household members, especially indoors. Many workplaces and stores require face coverings, and some local governments have their own directives.
  • The state's COVID-19 dashboard, which tracks cases, hospitalizations and deaths, is here.

What are the rules for traveling and gathering?

  • Non-Alaska residents traveling from outside the state must either submit a travel declaration and self-isolation plan through an online portal and arrive with proof of a negative test result, or purchase a COVID-19 test for $250 upon arrival and self-quarantine until they get the result. Alaska residents can either submit that online information and arrive with proof of a negative test, receive a COVID-19 test for free and quarantine until results arrive or self-quarantine at their own expense for 14 days or the duration of their trip, whichever is shorter. Health officials recommend travelers get a second test 5-14 days after their arrival and take other precautions. Find more information about travel requirements here.
  • Cities and municipalities may have additional travel restrictions and safety procedures, which can be found here.
  • In July, state officials announced local mitigation guidance that recommends limiting indoor gatherings to a maximum of 50 people in high-risk counties, 1oo people in moderate-risk counties and a minimum of six feet of distance between attendees in minimal-risk counties. Additional information about gatherings and community events is here.

What's open, and what's restricted or closed?

  • Businesses can open in line with recommendations and mitigation strategies outlined in Phase 3/4 guidance.
  • A health order effective Nov. 16 outlines protective guidance for critical infrastructure workers.

What's the status of K-12 schools?

  • Instructional models vary by district under the state's school reopening framework. Updates and resources for school communities can be found here.

What should I know about testing?

  • Health officials recommend testing for individuals showing symptoms as well as any close contacts of confirmed cases, regardless of symptoms. A testing site locator is here.

Where can I learn about resources and relief?

  • Resources for individuals, businesses and health care providers are listed at the bottom of this page.


Arizona

What's the big picture?

  • Arizona allows businesses to operate subject to specific restrictions depending on the level of community transmission in each county, with additional limitations on nightclubs, bars and organized events.
  • There is no statewide mask mandate, though health officials recommend residents wear face coverings in public. An emergency health order issued Nov. 19 requires all district and charter schools to mandate masks be worn on school campuses, buses and at school-associated activities.
  • The state's COVID-19 dashboard, showing tests, cases, deaths and other public health metrics, is here.

What are the rules for traveling and gathering?

  • An executive order extended in July prohibits organized events of more than 50 people. Local governments have the authority to approve events that meet specific safety precautions.

What's open, and what's restricted or closed?

  • Businesses can operate subject to certain general and industry-specific requirements.
  • Businesses including gyms, movie theaters, water parks, bars and nightclubs are subject to different occupancy limits and mitigation measures in counties with minimal and moderate community spread, as outlined here. They must close when counties reach "substantial transmission," and can begin a phased reopening once moderate and minimal transmission benchmarks are achieved.
  • Liquor-licensed restaurants, bars and nightclubs can operate, with capacity limits, in areas with minimal and moderate transmission only if they are converted to restaurant service. Bars and nightclubs not operating as restaurants can open only in communities with minimal community spread.

What's the status of K-12 schools?

  • A dashboard tracking the level of community spread in counties, which impacts decisions about school operations, is here. It also shows the recommend learning model for each county. Guidance for offering in-person instruction is here.
  • A statewide tracker of school learning models is updated here.

What should I know about testing?

  • Policies for patient criteria, billing and pre-registration vary by testing site, though most do require pre-registration. Information about testing sites is here.
  • Free saliva diagnostic testing is available by appointment only, at community events, through a partnership between state health officials and Arizona State University. Details are here.

Where can I learn about resources and relief?

  • Resources for individuals and businesses are collected here.


California

What's the big picture?

  • Under California's reopening plan, every county is assigned to a tier based on its public health metrics, with restrictions on businesses and activities varying by tier. In late November and early December, officials introduced regional curfews and stay-at-home orders in an effort to slow the spread of the virus in hardest-hit areas.
  • A statewide order requires people over the age of 2 to wear face coverings outside of the home except in limited circumstances.
  • The state's COVID-19 dashboard, which tracks cases, deaths and tests at the state and county level, is here. It also shows the risk level of each county.

What are the rules for traveling and gathering?

  • A travel advisory recommends that people arriving in California from out of state quarantine for 14 days, with exceptions for essential travel. State residents are encouraged to stay home or in their region.
  • State guidance prohibits gatherings that include more than three households. In purple tier counties, gatherings can be held outdoors only. Gatherings should be two hours or less. High-risk individuals are discouraged from attending any gatherings. Attendees must wear face coverings and practice hand hygiene and physical distancing. The guidance also states that singing, cheering, shouting and similar activities are "strongly discouraged" at outdoor gatherings and prohibited at indoor gatherings.
  • The regional stay-at-home order announced on Dec. 3 prohibits most gatherings of any size when regional ICU bed capacity is low.

What's open, and what's restricted or closed?

  • Use this tool to look up county-specific restrictions on businesses and activities. Industry-specific guidelines are here
  • As of Nov. 21, purple tier counties are directed to stop non-essential activities between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. The order remains in effect for one month. 
  • Under a regional stay-at-home order announced Dec. 3, regions with less than 15% ICU availability must close sector operations except for critical infrastructure and retail and almost all gatherings of any size are prohibited. The order is set to remain in effect for at least three weeks, at which point it will lift when a region's projected ICU capacity meets or exceeds 15%.

What's the status of K-12 schools?

  • The state will "move carefully towards reopening in-person instruction by county based on local health data," according to officials.
  • Information about school closures and operations can be found through individual districts, which are searchable here
  • Education-related updates and resources are here.

What should I know about testing?

  • All testing requests have equal priority, according to state health officials. When demand for tests exceeds capacity, certain populations will be prioritized for testing, starting with hospitalized patients with symptoms and individuals identified through an outbreak or contact tracing investigation. The second priority tier consists of individuals with symptoms, close contacts of confirmed cases and people without symptoms who live or work in certain settings.
  • Details about testing options and locations are here. An interactive map of testing sites is here.

Where can I learn about resources and relief?

  • The "get help" section of the state's COVID-19 response website offers resources for food assistance, financial help, businesses, immigrant communities, housing, emotional support, child care and seniors.


Colorado

What's the big picture?

  • Colorado has enacted a "dial" system in which the level of restrictions varies between counties depending on their number of new cases, percent positivity and hospitalization trends. A color-coded map showing counties' status is updated here.
  • A statewide order requires everyone over the age of 10 to wear face coverings in indoor public spaces and while using public or non-personal transportation services. It has been extended through Dec. 9.
  • The state's COVID-19 dashboard, showing cases, hospitalizations, deaths and other key public health metrics, is here.

What are the rules for traveling and gathering?

  • Limits on personal gatherings vary by county. Green level counties can allow gatherings per local guidance, while in blue, yellow and orange counties gatherings are limited to a maximum of 10 people from no more than two households. Personal gatherings are prohibited in red and purple counties.

What's open, and what's restricted or closed?

  • Under the dial system, occupancy limits and hours of operation for businesses, places of worship, higher education, organized events and personal gatherings vary according to counties' color-coded status.
  • Counties classified as lower-risk can apply for site-specific variances to allow indoor and/or outdoor venues that meet certain criteria to operate.
  • Childcare is open in all six risk categories. Bars can open, with restrictions, only in green-level counties. Indoor dining at restaurants must close in red counties, and indoor and outdoor dining closes in purple counties. Indoor events, seated and unseated, are closed in red and purple counties.
  • General and sector-specific operating guidelines for businesses are here.

What's the status of K-12 schools?

  • P-12 schools can operate fully in-person in counties classified as green or blue. In yellow and orange counties, in-person instruction is suggested with hybrid and remote models permitted as appropriate. In red counties, state officials suggest P-5 schools operate in person, middle schools operate with any model and high schools operate remote or hybrid.
  • District reopening plans and other COVID-19 resources for school communities can be found here.

What should I know about testing?

  • Anyone with symptoms should get tested as soon as possible, according to state health officials, while people who think they may have been exposed should wait about seven days unless they develop symptoms. Symptomatic health care workers and first responders can call a designated number to arrange a test. More information about testing is here, and a map of community testing sites is here.

Where can I learn about resources and relief?

  • Information about state resources and assistance is here.


Hawaii

What's the big picture?

  • Under Hawaii's phased reopening plan, reopening strategies for businesses and operations vary by county according to their color-coded "impact level." Most of the state is classified as "Act With Care," but each county maintains its own impact level and relevant restrictions.
  • A statewide mask mandate has been in place since late April. A stronger order issued in November requires everyone to wear face coverings in public, and specifies that business owners shall refuse admission or service to anyone who doesn't comply and isn't covered by an exception.
  • The state's COVID-19 dashboards, which track cases, public health trends and data about travelers, are here.

What are the rules for traveling and gathering?

  • Travelers must take a COVID-19 test from a state-approved testing partner before the final leg of their trip to Hawaii. Trans-Pacific travelers arriving without proof of a negative test result from within 72 hours of their departure must quarantine for 14 days. More information about travel requirements is here, and resources for travelers are here.
  • As of Dec. 2, the county of Kauai has temporarily opted out of the pre-travel testing program, meaning all incoming travelers must quarantine for 14 days upon arrival.
  • Size limits and mask requirements for gatherings vary by county.

What's open, and what's restricted or closed?

  • The operational status and level of restrictions on businesses and services vary depending on a county's color-coded impact level, the most restrictive of which is "stay at home." In every stage, businesses must follow general and sector-specific health guidelines from the county, state and federal level.
  • Large venues and clubs are open only in the two lowest-risk categories. More businesses, including bars, personal services and indoor exercise facilities, are required to close in higher-risk counties.

What's the status of K-12 schools?

  • Information about the state's school reopening plan, including a map of the health department's recommended learning models for each island, is here.
  • Confirmed cases associated with schools are reported here.

What should I know about testing?

  • People can get tested if they have symptoms, were in close contact with an infected individual or have been asked or referred by healthcare providers to get tested, according to health officials. A virtual screening tool is here.
  • Testing resources and locations vary by county, with more information available here.

Where can I learn about resources and relief?

  • Information about various state resources and benefits is collected here. Additional resources for businesses are here, and for residents here.


Idaho

What's the big picture?

  • Idaho moved back to Stage 2 of its reopening plan in mid-November, allowing businesses to operate with certain restrictions and limiting the size of gatherings.
  • There is no statewide mask mandate, though some localities have enacted their own. Face coverings are required at long-term care facilities statewide by executive order, and state health guidance for schools says masks should be worn in classrooms, hallways, carpools, buses and other areas where social distancing cannot be maintained.
  • The state's COVID-19 dashboards, tracking cases, hospitalizations, deaths, demographics and trends, are here.

What are the rules for traveling and gathering?

  • Both private and public gatherings are limited to no more than 10 people in Stage 2, with physical distancing and other precautions required. Local ordinances about gathering limits can be found here.

What's open, and what's restricted or closed?

  • Businesses and activities can operate in accordance with sector-specific protocols.
  • In Stage 2, bars and restaurants can operate only if patrons are seated at all times, and nightclubs may be open as bars operating under the same conditions. Employers should encourage telework whenever possible, and vulnerable individuals should self-isolate.

What's the status of K-12 schools?

  • Resources for school communities, including data reports of COVID-19 cases associated with schools, are available here.
  • Educational models vary by school district and are updated on this map.

What should I know about testing?

  • Testing is available mostly to individuals with symptoms and people who have had close contact with confirmed cases, under state guidance.
  • Take an online assessment and get connected to a testing site through the "Crush The Curve Idaho" website, or search for testing sites here.

Where can I learn about resources and relief?

  • Resources for businesses are available here. Mental and behavioral health resources are here. Additional COVID-19 guidance is here.


Montana

What's the big picture?

  • Montana has been in Phase 2 of its reopening plan since June, with additional restrictions on gatherings and certain businesses enacted in November.
  • A mask mandate issued in mid-November expands upon a July order requiring face coverings in certain settings and an August order requiring them in K-12 schools, applying the directives to all counties regardless of case count.
  • The state's COVID-19 dashboard, showing cases by county and other public health metrics, is here.

What are the rules for traveling and gathering?

  • Under an order effective Nov. 20, public gatherings and events where it is not possible to practice social distancing are limited to a maximum of 25 people. The limit does not apply to schools, houses of worship, restaurants, bars, breweries and casinos.
  • The order also urges individuals "in the strongest terms" to limit their involvement in in-person gatherings of 15 or more people, including inside private homes, and practice social distancing in gatherings of any size.

What's open, and what's restricted or closed?

  • In Phase 2, businesses are open in line with physical distancing requirements. Gathering limits are in place for organized youth activities and places of assembly.
  • Vulnerable individuals should adhere to stay at home guidance. Visitation at certain senior living and assisted living facilities is permitted subject to restrictions.
  • As of Nov. 20, restaurants, bars, breweries, distilleries and casinos are limited to 50% capacity, with social distancing and table spacing requirements, and must close between the hours of 10 p.m. and 4 a.m.

What's the status of K-12 schools?

  • Educational models vary by district. Information about reopening schools is here.

What should I know about testing?

  • State health officials prioritize testing for symptomatic individuals, close contacts of confirmed cases, frontline workers and residents of certain congregate settings, as well as for asymptomatic individuals on a limited basis. Testing eligibility and locations vary by county. More details are here.

Where can I learn about resources and relief?

  • A directory of state services and assistance is here. Resources for children and families are here.


Nevada

What's the big picture?

  • Nevada has been in Phase 2 of its recovery roadmap since late May, and replaced its county-based guidelines with narrower reopening criteria for individual businesses in July. Officials introduced additional mitigation measures for individuals and businesses in late November, which are set to last for three week.
  • Anyone in any public space must wear a face covering, under a statewide mask mandate issued in June.
  • The state's COVID-19 dashboards, which track cases, deaths, tests, hospitalizations and other state and county trends, are here.

What are the rules for traveling and gathering?

  • Private gatherings are limited to no more than 10 people from a maximum of two households, and the state's face covering requirement is extended to such gatherings, effective Nov. 24 for three weeks.
  • Public gatherings are limited to no more than 50 people or 25% capacity, whichever is less, and no large events will be approved during this period.

What's open, and what's restricted or closed?

  • Businesses can operate in line with general and sector-specific requirements.
  • Under a three-week pause starting Nov. 24, occupancy at restaurants, bars, gaming operations, gyms, fitness facilities and other business activities is reduced to 25% of fire code capacity. Retail stores remain at 50% capacity with social distancing and other requirements. A comparison of restrictions before and during the pause is here.

What's the status of K-12 schools?

  • School operations vary by district. Information about school plans and education-related resources is here.

What should I know about testing?

  • While state testing criteria includes both symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals, individual eligibility varies by testing site. More information about testing locations and criteria is available here.

Where can I learn about resources and relief?

  • The state's resource portal is here.


New Mexico

What's the big picture?

  • Following a two-week statewide pause on most businesses and activities, New Mexico transitioned to a three-tiered, county-by-county COVID-19 risk system on Dec. 2 that allows localities to decrease restrictions when they have driven down positivity rates. County data is updated every Wednesday.
  • A statewide mask mandate took effect in May, and requires individuals to wear face coverings in public, including while exercising, except for when drinking, eating or under medical instruction.
  • The state's COVID-19 dashboard, showing cases, hospitalizations, deaths and other metrics, is here.

What are the rules for traveling and gathering?

  • Travelers arriving from states with a positivity rate of 5% or higher over a 7-day rolling average, or a positive test rate greater than 80 per 1 million residents, must quarantine for 14 days or the duration of their stay, whichever is shorter. Health officials recommend rather than require quarantining for people coming from lower-risk states, and advise they be tested for COVID-19 within 5-7 days of their arrival. More information about travel requirements and high-risk states is here.
  • Gathering size limits vary by county according to their risk designation under the "Red to Green" framework. Mass gatherings are limited to 5 people and 10 vehicles in red counties, 10 people and 25 vehicles in yellow counties and 20 people and 100 vehicles in green counties.

What's open, and what's restricted or closed?

  • Industries must operate in accordance with general and sector-specific safety practices.
  • Capacity limits for businesses and services vary between counties depending on their risk designation under the "Red to Green" framework. Close-contact recreational facilities including bars, performance venues, casinos and indoor theaters and museums remain closed throughout.
  • Under red-level restrictions, indoor dining is closed and any establishment serving alcohol must close by 9 p.m.

What's the status of K-12 schools?

  • Instruction models vary locally. State education department guidance, resources and updates are here.
  • New Mexico's rapid response COVID-19 watchlist and closures list, which includes schools and other organizations, is updated here.

What should I know about testing?

  • Health officials recommend testing for people with symptoms, asymptomatic people who are close contacts or household members of confirmed cases and patients who are scheduled for surgery and whose health care providers have advised to get tested beforehand. Testing criteria and requirements vary between non state-operated locations.
  • Register for a test at a state-operated testing site here. A testing site locator is here.

Where can I learn about resources and relief?

  • The state's resource and assistance portal, with information related to health, employment, childcare, education, housing, utilities and other sectors, is here.


Oregon

What's the big picture?

  • Following a statewide two-week freeze on many businesses and activities, Oregon officials at the start of December introduced an updated framework for assigning risk levels and associated mitigation measures to counties based on their COVID-19 spread. From Dec. 3 through Dec. 17, 25 counties are in the highest risk level, five are considered high risk, two are moderate risk and four are lower risk.
  • Masks are required statewide "at all times" for everyone over the age of 5, with few exceptions.
  • The state's COVID-19 dashboards, showing daily numbers of cases and tests as well as longer-term trends in demographics and hospital capacity, are here.

What are the rules for traveling and gathering?

  • A travel advisory recommends that people arriving in Oregon from outside the state quarantine for 14 days, with exceptions for essential travel. Health officials encourage Oregonians to stay home or in their region and avoid nonessential trips.
  • Gathering limits vary based on the risk level of each county. Indoor at-home and social gatherings must be limited to no more than six people in extreme and high risk counties, eight people in moderate risk counties and 10 people in lower risk counties, with additional recommendations for the number of households involved in each. Outdoor at-home and social gatherings must be limited to no more than six people in extreme risk counties, eight people in high risk counties, 10 people in moderate risk counties and 12 people in lower risk counties.

What's open, and what's restricted or closed?

  • Capacity limits and other requirements for eating and drinking establishments, recreation and fitness establishments, entertainment establishments, retail stores, shopping malls, faith institutions, offices and long-term care facility visitation vary based on counties' risk levels.
  • Indoor recreation, fitness and entertainment establishments, indoor visitation at long-term care facilities and indoor dining at restaurants are prohibited in extreme risk counties.
  • Use this tool to identify restrictions on activities by county.

What's the status of K-12 schools?

  • School operations vary by district. Weekly status updates are here.
  • State resources related to COVID-19 and schools can be found here.

What should I know about testing?

  • People should get tested if they are experiencing symptoms or had close contact with someone who tested positive for COVID-19, according to state health officials. More information about testing and testing locations, including free community testing events, is here.

Where can I learn about resources and relief?

  • The state's COVID-19 resource portal, organized by topic, is here.


Utah

What's the big picture?

  • Utah's transmission index places counties into one of three levels of COVID-19 transmission, with associated public health recommendations. Data is analyzed weekly and county status is subject to change.
  • A statewide mask mandate issued in November requires individuals to wear face coverings in public and when within 6 feet of anyone they do not live with, and is enforceable in business settings.
  • The state's COVID-19 dashboard, showing tests, cases, hospitalizations and deaths, is here.

What are the rules for traveling and gathering?

  • State guidance recommends limiting gatherings to 50 people or fewer in counties with low transmission levels, and a maximum of 10 people in counties with moderate and high transmission levels.

What's open, and what's restricted or closed?

  • Businesses and activities can operate in line with public health recommendations that may vary depending on a county's level of transmission.
  • In counties with high levels of transmission, bars cannot sell alcohol later than 10 p.m.
  • Under public health orders, in-person high school extracurricular activities require testing of every coach, official and participant at least every other week, and symptom and exposure checking are required before each in-person engagement.
  • A statewide order effective Nov. 24 through Dec. 8 outlines expectations and restrictions for individuals, businesses, events, organized sports and institutions of higher education.

What's the status of K-12 schools?

  • A dashboard showing confirmed COVID-19 cases associated with schools is here.
  • Decisions about school scenarios are made by districts in consultation with local health departments, according to state guidance. COVID-19 information and resources are here.

What should I know about testing?

  • Testing is available to anyone showing symptoms of COVID-19. Health officials recommend that people who come into close contact with a confirmed case quarantine and get tested 5-7 days after exposure. Some testing sites provide work- and travel-related testing. More information about testing is here, and a testing site locator is here.

Where can I learn about resources and relief?

  • Resources for employers and businesses are here. Resources for communities and individuals are collected here.


Washington

What's the big picture?

  • Under Washington's "Safe Start" plan, restrictions on businesses and individuals vary based on which of the four reopening phases a given county is in. The reopening plan is paused as of mid-November.
  • Face masks are required in public spaces and shared spaces, both indoors and outdoors. Employers must ensure employees wear face coverings in almost all work situations. Businesses are prohibited from allowing customers to enter without face coverings.
  • The state's COVID-19 dashboard, which shows cases, hospitalizations, deaths and trends, is here.

What are the rules for traveling and gathering?

  • A travel advisory recommends that people arriving in Washington from out of state quarantine for 14 days and limit their interactions to their immediate household, with exceptions for essential travel.
  • Under statewide guidance effective Nov. 16 through Dec. 14, outdoor social gatherings are limited to five people from outside one's household. Indoor social gatherings with non-household members are prohibited unless attendees either quarantine for 14 days prior to the event, or quarantine for 7 days and get a negative test result no more than 48 hours before the gathering.

What's open, and what's restricted or closed?

  • Businesses can operate in line with sector-specific guidelines.
  • Statewide guidance effective Nov. 16 through Dec. 14 tightens restrictions on gatherings, businesses and other activities. Restaurants and bars are closed for indoor dine-in service, indoor operations at fitness facilities are paused, real estate open houses are prohibited and most indoor visitation at long-term care facilities is prohibited.
  • Establishments including movie theaters, bowling alleys and museums are closed for indoor service.
  • Wedding and funeral ceremonies are limited to no more than 30 people, and indoor receptions are prohibited. In-store retail and personal care services are limited to 25% of indoor occupancy limits. Professional services are required to mandate that employees work from home to the extent possible, with offices remaining open required to limit occupancy to 25%.

What's the status of K-12 schools?

  • Instructional models vary by district and are updated here. Education-related information and resources can be found here.

What should I know about testing?

  • Anyone with symptoms or likely exposures should get tested and anyone concerned about their health can get seek out testing, according to state health guidance. Find testing locations here.

Where can I learn about resources and relief?

  • Information about resources for individuals and families is here, with additional information for workers here and employers here.


Wyoming

What's the big picture?

  • Wyoming issued several public health orders in November outlining specific safety requirements for many businesses and limiting the size of indoor gatherings.
  • There is no statewide mask mandate, but state officials issued guidance about masks in schools and several counties have local mask orders.
  • The state's COVID-19 dashboard, tracking cases and deaths, is here

What are the rules for traveling and gathering?

  • Indoor gatherings of more than 25 people are prohibited, with some exceptions, under an order effective Nov. 24 through Dec. 15.

What's open, and what's restricted or closed?

  • Businesses are open with restrictions.
  • An order effective Nov. 24 through Dec. 15 outlines capacity limits, sanitation measures and social distancing requirements for bars, restaurants, theaters, gyms, child care facilities and educational institutions.
  • An order effective Nov. 24 through Dec. 15 institutes similar restrictions for personal care service businesses. Patrons must wear face coverings while receiving service and workers must wear face coverings when within six feet of others. 

What's the status of K-12 schools?

  • School plans vary by district, with information available here
  • Resources related to education and childcare are here

What should I know about testing?

  • Residents can order free at-home saliva-based testing kits. Employers can also order kits for workplace surveillance testing.
  • A testing site locator is here.

Where can I learn about resources and relief?

  • Resources for individuals are here. Financial and business resources are here.

The first version of this page was originally published on March 12. This is a developing story. We will continue to update as new information becomes available.


This is part of a series about coronavirus-related restrictions across the United States.

Northeast: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont

Midwest: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, Wisconsin

South: Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Puerto Rico, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia

West: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.