More, More, Moray

Dec 4, 2020
Originally published on December 4, 2020 1:20 pm

What has more eyes, a starfish or a scallop? Big Mouth's Ayo Edebiri and her fellow "Iconography" podcast host Olivia Craighead compare animals and guess which has more of a thing.

heard on: Rosie Perez, Fortune Feimster & Big Mouth's Ayo Edebiri: Fight And Flight

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OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Our next two contestants are on the line. Ayo Edebiri voices the character of Missy in the new season of the Netflix animated series "Big Mouth," which dropped this weekend. And she hosts the podcast Iconography with her fellow contestant, comedian Olivia Craighead. Ayo, Olivia, hello.

OLIVIA CRAIGHEAD: Hi.

AYO EDEBIRI: Hi.

EISENBERG: So, Ayo, am I right in saying that you are on the west side of the United States right now?

EDEBIRI: Right now I'm back on the east side.

EISENBERG: OK.

EDEBIRI: But these days, I've been residing west.

CRAIGHEAD: Yeah. I got to see Ayo in-person for the first time in, like, a year the other day, which was very thrilling to me.

EISENBERG: Yep. Yep.

EDEBIRI: Yeah, then we sat across (laughter) the table.

CRAIGHEAD: Yeah, we sat across a long table - like, outside - from each other, gossiped.

(SOUNDBITE OF , "")

EDEBIRI: And just gossiped with masks on. It was perfect.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: You know what? I was actually just talking to someone who said to me that one of the things that he misses the most is live gossip.

EDEBIRI: Is gossip, yes.

EISENBERG: Yeah.

EDEBIRI: Live gossip.

CRAIGHEAD: Ayo and I have constantly been saying that the pandemic has brought on, like, a gossip drought because people aren't, like, making bad decisions out at the club anymore. So it's just kind of, like...

EDEBIRI: It's harder work.

CRAIGHEAD: It's - we find a way, but...

EDEBIRI: Yeah.

EISENBERG: Right. I was - you know, I haven't looked at a, you know, Us Magazine, like, fashion police thing in a long time. But I'm sure that's not having its heyday.

EDEBIRI: Yeah. Well, it's hard to call the fashion police on anybody when we're all wearing, like, the same, like, gray sweatpants.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: And a mask. And a mask.

EDEBIRI: And a mask, yeah.

EISENBERG: It'd be like, oh.

CRAIGHEAD: The celebrities are struggling. There's, like, nowhere for them to go. They're getting, like, papped outside the grocery store like it's nobody's business.

(LAUGHTER)

CRAIGHEAD: Like, that's where they have to go now. That's the step-and-repeat outside of Whole Foods.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: All right, we have a couple of great games for you. Want to play some games?

EDEBIRI: Yes.

CRAIGHEAD: Yes.

EISENBERG: Excellent. So in our first game, you're going to be playing against each other. You're going to be competing, so we'll go back and forth. We are going to give you the trait or characteristic of an animal and two animals to choose from. And your job is just to guess which animal has more of this certain trait.

CRAIGHEAD: OK.

EDEBIRI: Great.

EISENBERG: We also have some hints if you want.

EDEBIRI: Olivia and I are both famously competitive. So...

EISENBERG: Oh, good.

EDEBIRI: We will see. I mean, like, Olivia, always, you're free to ask for a hint. I just want you to know.

(LAUGHTER)

JONATHAN COULTON: Oh, boy.

EISENBERG: Wow.

EDEBIRI: (Laughter).

CRAIGHEAD: That is so rude. That is so rude. I need to, like, demolish you. I need to win.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: OK. Olivia, which animal can lay more eggs at once, a platypus or an emperor penguin?

CRAIGHEAD: OK. I feel like the penguins get, like, the one, and then they, like, hold that little egg in their nook for a long time. So I'm going to go with a platypus.

EISENBERG: You're correct, yeah. A platypus can lay up to three eggs in one clutch. I was not aware that that was the term, but there you go.

CRAIGHEAD: Clutch?

EISENBERG: (Laughter).

COULTON: I don't like the phrase platypus clutch.

CRAIGHEAD: I don't like that.

EDEBIRI: I kind of love it. What does that mean about me? I'm kind of into it.

COULTON: (Laughter) All right, Ayo, which animal has more eyeballs, a starfish or a scallop?

EDEBIRI: Eww.

EISENBERG: Yes. Yes.

COULTON: I know. Did you - I mean, nobody wants to think about the eyeballs of either one of those animals.

EDEBIRI: OK, because I feel like I want to answer starfish - that I'm going to answer scallop.

COULTON: You're going to go with the trick question theory.

EDEBIRI: Yeah. Let's just try it.

COULTON: This theory has served you well. You are correct.

EDEBIRI: Let's go.

EISENBERG: Yep.

COULTON: So a starfish - a sunflower seastar, for example, has an eye on the end of each one of its legs, so it can have up to 24 eyes - one per leg, obviously. But scallops - you can do it after the show - go ahead and Google scallops' eyes because it is the stuff of nightmares. A scallop has 200 telescopic eyeballs.

EDEBIRI: No.

CRAIGHEAD: No. I'm going to tell you right now, I'm not Googling it.

COULTON: (Laughter).

EISENBERG: Olivia, which animal has more teeth, a great white shark or a slug?

CRAIGHEAD: OK, so this feels really trick-questiony (ph), but - because sharks have rows of teeth, you know? So it's like - I am going to go with the answer that I don't want it to be, which is a slug.

EDEBIRI: Olivia.

EISENBERG: Yeah, that's - yeah, so you were right. The great white shark can have up to, like, 300 hundred teeth in rows, like you said. But your average land slug has thousands of teeth - thousands.

CRAIGHEAD: What is it using it for? Why do they need so many teeth? What are they eating?

COULTON: (Laughter).

CRAIGHEAD: I also am thinking, like, those teeth must be so small.

EISENBERG: They are very small.

COULTON: All right, Ayo, this is the last question. Which animal poops more...

EDEBIRI: Love that.

COULTON: ...A rhino or a hippo?

EDEBIRI: Oh, love this - between rhino or hippo...

COULTON: Rhino or hippo.

EDEBIRI: And here's the thing. They don't really - well, OK, rhinos are sort of on land, walking around, right? And hippos are kind of like - they're kind of like everywhere. They're like land, sea - they're, like - birds are on them. Let's go, like, hippo vibes.

CRAIGHEAD: Hippo vibes.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: Feeling some hippo vibes today.

EDEBIRI: Yeah.

COULTON: It's actually - the answer is rhino.

EDEBIRI: Well, wait a minute.

COULTON: (Laughter) I don't know why, but rhinos poop as much as 50 pounds per day, while hippos - only around 22 pounds.

EDEBIRI: I'm going to spin this around, and I'm going to say I think it's good that I got this one wrong, actually.

CRAIGHEAD: It'd be so sick if you got it right. I wouldn't be able to look at you again.

(LAUGHTER)

EDEBIRI: Actually, that's a rhino. Don't ask me how I know.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Well done. I feel that was perfect, and you both did incredible. You both did incredible.

EDEBIRI: Thank you. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.