Pallavi Gogoi

In a note to newsroom staff, Chief Business Editor Pallavi Gogoi announced the following staffing update:

I'm delighted to announce that Shannon Bond is joining NPR as Technology Correspondent, based in Silicon Valley.

Humiliation. In China, it is a word laden with history and identity that is playing a role in the high-stakes trade war between the U.S. and China.

This month, I was visiting China with a small group of journalists for 10 days, and the word "humiliation" came up over and over again in conversations both public and private, in meetings with top government officials, university scholars, think tankers and corporate executives.

A top Huawei executive said Tuesday that the company is willing to sign a "no-spy agreement" with the United States to reassure U.S. leaders who say the company's technology could be used for surveillance.

The offer is similar to proposals the Chinese tech giant has made to the United Kingdom and Germany, and it comes after weeks of intense pressure from the Trump administration.

These are prosperous times in America. The country is plump with jobs. Out of every 100 people who want to work, more than 96 of them have jobs. This is what economists consider full employment.

The economy has grown for almost 10 years, making it one of the longest economic expansions in U.S. history. And over that time, the job market has come back. It grew slowly at first, then steadily, finally reaching a point at which there are many more openings than job seekers.

Updated at 8:43 a.m. ET Monday

CBS News announced a major shake-up in the lineup of its flagship shows on Monday morning.

In what would represent the most significant changes under new CBS News President Susan Zirinsky, the network plans to drop chief evening anchor Jeff Glor in favor of one of Zirinsky's morning stars, Norah O'Donnell, and rebuild the morning show around CBS's Gayle King.

China's Vice President Wang Qishan likes parables.

He offers tales from ancient China when he wants to make a point.

I discovered that last week at the World Economic Forum at Davos, Switzerland, where Wang spoke and I listened intently on the translation headsets provided by the forum.

A new president is elected. Within days of being sworn in, he pulls his country out of a U.N. migration pact. His path to power has been pockmarked by disparaging comments about women, including a congresswoman. His preferred choice for top posts are members of the armed forces.

Davos is where world leaders preen and articulate grand visions in a glamorous setting that beckons with powdery snow and shiny klieg lights. The annual meeting, high in the Swiss Alps, is the ultimate gathering of the global elite.