Karen Duffin

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We're bringing you a story now from our Planet Money podcast team. Reporter Karen Duffin got a tip about a parking lot where the rules just seemed off, so she looked into it.

What happens when a police department can no longer afford its bad behavior?

In 2013, Tony Miranda was brought in to lead a police department in crisis. Bad behavior by a handful of officers had led to investigations and lawsuits with costs in the millions of dollars. That was more than the city could cover.

He knew change would be difficult. But he also knew he had a powerful ally on his side: insurance coverage.

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When a listener emailed to tell us that a plane full of passengers had just unexpectedly landed in Iran, we just had to figure out what happened.

Today on the show, we hear what it's like to go to Iran by accident from two passengers who were on that flight. And we discover that, while getting people out of Iran is one thing, getting an airplane out of Iran is just a very expensive intercontinental geopolitical mess. It's a vacation story with tourists, a sanctioned government, and an unlucky plane from Norway.

What do silver dollars, Venmo, and Brexit have in common? They're all on the minds of our listeners.

Today on the show, we take listener questions, and hunt for answers. We try to figure out how Venmo makes money, how the tax system really works, why truckers are buying helicopters in England, and more.

Marriott. Target. The Democratic National Committee. There are so many hacks so often, they may feel unstoppable. And companies are trying everything. We watch as one company grapples with being hacked, and find out that a dusty old financial tool, hundreds of years old, could solve this very modern problem.

Music: "Bring the Roof Down" and "Croisette Balade," and "Baiser Fatal."

A lot can happen after we put an episode out into the world. That's why we love The Rest Of The Story, our periodic check-in on stories we've reported.

Today on the show, we revisit some episodes from the year that was. In case you missed them, here are the original episodes featured.

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Their plan was dangerous, risky, and extremely unpopular. But America — and much of the rest of the world — copied them anyway.

Today on the show, how New Zealand changed the way governments all over the world run their economies. This tiny country created an idea called inflation targeting.

If you are one of the more than 70 million people who've been arrested in America, you probably have a mugshot. Websites have turned these mugshots into a business, posting mugshots and charging people to take them down.

If they don't pay up, the mugshot can make it hard to get jobs, dates, housing, even if they were never actually charged or convicted. Some people call it extortion. The websites call it a public service.

Today on the show, we go deep inside the online mugshot industry, where the First Amendment and our right to privacy clash in really complicated ways.

New York City recently produced a report on the gender price differential in some consumer goods. The so-called Pink Tax. It turns out, women pay more than men for certain goods, like clothes and home health products and personal care products. The study found that women pay as much as 13 percent more for some categories of products.

Every hero has a nemesis. Tom had Jerry. Batman had the Joker. Politicians are no different. Basically every candidate who has ever run for office targets the same enemy: Regulations. Red tape. Rules churned out by the federal bureaucracy that touch on everything from carbon emissions to goat farms to vending machines.

Today on the show, we have a special report. We've learned that as many as 13,000 immigrants, most of them Chinese, may be at risk of being deported. They were all granted asylum years ago.

Now, the government is scrutinizing their cases. It goes back to an investigation called Operation Fiction Writer, which was announced in 2012. Dozens of people were rounded up for helping immigrants lie on their asylum applications.

In 2010, Martin Greenberg walked up to the 13th hole at a golf course owned by Donald J. Trump. He was competing in a charity golf tournament, and this hole was a special one. It was the location of the million dollar hole-in-one contest, so a million dollars was on the line. A police officer was standing by, just to make sure no funny business happened.

Greenberg pulled back his golf club, hit the ball, and got the hole-in-one. That was the easy part.

This episode originally ran on March 15, 2013.

Sometimes your success depends on how your competitors behave. People judge you not just by your product, but by the product that your rival down the street makes.

This is a problem for Lou Caracciolo. He's trying to make high-quality wine, from grapes he grows in New Jersey. But Jersey wine already has a reputation — and fancy isn't it. On today's show: Can New Jersey become the next Napa?

Every time we air an episode, we get a bunch of tweets and emails from our listeners. And then time passes, and... new stuff happens.

Today on the show, we revisit some of our favorite episodes and bring you updates.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

How could politics change if the Supreme Court outlaws partisan gerrymandering? It's being asked to do that. Karen Duffin of our Planet Money podcast reports what happened when Florida banned it.

Note: This is the second episode in a series on elections and how they can be gamed. The first episode is #845: REDMAP. (You can listen in any order!)

Florida should be a swing state. But for the past 25 years, most of its representatives have been Republicans. That's because Republicans drew electoral maps that favored their own candidates. They gerrymandered.

Episode 845: REDMAP

Jun 1, 2018

Local elections used to be a low-key affair in Blue Hill, Maine. So residents of the small town were shocked, in 2010, when a candidate for the Maine State Senate was targeted by a flood of negative ads.

The ads claimed he had canceled the town Fourth of July fireworks show and nobody in town knew who was paying for them.

In the 1940s, if you were flying from New York City to London or Paris you would find yourself making a pit stop for fuel on the western coast of Ireland. The Shannon airport at the time wasn't much to look at, but the passengers arriving there were movie stars and celebrities, basically the super rich. And the people of Shannon realized pretty quickly that they needed to upgrade the local amenities for their wealthy clientele. They hired a man named Brendan O'Regan to make it happen.