Chuck Quirmbach

Chuck Quirmbach is a Milwaukee-based reporter who covers developments and issues in Southeastern Wisconsin that are of statewide interest. He has numerous years of experience covering state government, elections, the environment, energy, racial diversity issues, clergy abuse claims and major baseball stadium doings. He enjoys covering all topics.

Chuck is a frequent contributor to National Public Radio and several other regional or national radio outlets. He has won several individual awards, and several as part of a collaboration with other reporters.

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During a ceremony at the White House in July 2017, a beaming President Trump announced Foxconn was coming to Wisconsin.

The world's largest contract manufacturer of consumer electronics wanted to be in America, Trump said.

"Investing many, many billions of dollars, right here in America, creating thousands of jobs," Trump said. "And I mean, American jobs, that's what we want."

To land the company, Wisconsin's then-governor, Republican Scott Walker, signed one of the largest tax incentive deals ever made between a state and a private company.

Nearly two years ago, President Trump stood in the East Room of the White House and announced that Taiwan-based Foxconn — a major supplier of Apple technology — was going to build its first U.S. manufacturing facility, outside Milwaukee.

"This is a great day for American workers, and manufacturers, and for everyone who believes in the concept, and the label, 'Made in the USA,' " the president boasted.

House Speaker Paul Ryan easily defeated conservative business executive Paul Nehlen in Wisconsin's primary Tuesday night.

"I am humbled and honored that Wisconsinites in the 1st Congressional District support my efforts to keep fighting on their behalf," said a statement Ryan released late Tuesday. "Janna and I are grateful to have the support of so many in southern Wisconsin, and we are truly thankful for all of their hard work."

Many motorcycle riders covet the distinctive growl of a Harley-Davidson — and sometimes even add extra-loud exhaust pipes to amp up the sound.

But the motorcycle maker has now rolled out a prototype bike that makes more of a whisper than a rumble. It's a sporty-looking model called LiveWire, and it's powered by batteries.

Harley-Davidson plans to take its prototype electric motorcycle to more than 30 cities over the next few months. Sometime after that, the company will decide whether to put LiveWire on the market.

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One year ago Monday, Wade Michael Page, a gunman with links to neo-Nazi groups, went to a Sikh temple in Oak Creek, Wis., and killed six worshippers. Family members, law enforcement and the larger community marked the anniversary over the weekend.

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker praised the Sikh community for calling for greater understanding and peace.

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