Chloee Weiner

Even before rioters stormed the Capitol two weeks ago, the inauguration of Joe Biden and Kamala Harris as president and vice president was going to look different from ceremonies past.

The risk of large crowds with the ongoing pandemic meant there would be no parade down Pennsylvania Avenue, and many of the usual performances and speakers had been replaced with plans for virtual events.

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Voting ends Tuesday in an election that many are calling the most important in their lifetime. In a historic year with more than 100 million votes cast early, the timeline for election results remains up in the air.

Listen to NPR's special coverage through the night. Follow updates and analysis on NPR.org, too.

In April, Yuh-Line Niou, a member of the New York State Assembly, was passing out KN95 masks in front of a Kosher deli in her district when she was verbally harassed by a stranger who approached her on the street.

"He said something like, 'You're the one who brought the virus here. I hope you die,' " she recalled. "It's horrifying. You're doing what you can to help people and everyone else wants you to die."

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Updated Friday at 12:35 a.m. ET

Updated at 2:35 p.m. ET

The Senate Judiciary Committee held its fourth and final day of hearings to consider the nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett, President Trump's nominee for the Supreme Court, on Thursday.

Read through the highlights of the hearing here.

The seat was made vacant last month by the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, launching a contentious nomination process just weeks before the Nov. 3 presidential election.

Updated at 10:34 a.m. ET

President Trump and first lady Melania Trump have tested positive for the coronavirus amid a busy week of events and during the height of the presidential campaign.

The president is expected to remain under watch of doctors at the White House but intends to continue carrying out his official duties.

Updated on Friday at 12:39 a.m. ET

President Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden debated Thursday night in Nashville for the final time before voting ends on Nov. 3.

In 2018, shortly after hitting 1 billion users, photo-sharing app Instagram celebrated a flashy product launch in San Francisco with a lineup of its greatest hits: There were cruffins and avocado toast, areas for selfie-taking and a barista serving matcha lattes.

Ricardo Flores can't vote on Tuesday. He's not a citizen.

But Flores wants to play a role now. He figures if he can convince a few people, especially members of his own Latino community in Kansas City, Mo., to cast a ballot for his candidate — that's a close second.

"I'm going to become a citizen of this country," he says. "And I'm going to be able to vote and I have my life here now, I want to see things better."

One of the first things people do when they use Google Street View is check out the place where they live.

So when Tawanda Kanhema moved to the United States in 2009, he looked up his hometown of Harare, Zimbabwe's capital city, on the map of panoramic images. A self-described tech enthusiast now some 10,000 miles away from home, he was eager to see a virtual tour of the city.

This story is based on an episode of NPR's Life Kit.

Geoff and Ellie live in a suburban Chicago neighborhood that looks familiar from movies like Pretty in Pink and Ferris Bueller's Day Off — both filmed in the area.

They have three kids — Nathan, 5, Benji, 11, and Abby, 14 — and they're worried that all three are too into their screens.

An all-too-common experience