Morning Edition

Every weekday for over three decades, Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, NPR Illinois journalists, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by other NPR Member Station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

President Trump has named Robert O'Brien to be his fourth national security adviser. O'Brien is taking over one of the most important foreign policy jobs in Washington. The president praised his new national security adviser for his work as a State Department hostage envoy.

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PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP: He's worked with me for quite awhile now on hostages. And we've had a tremendous track record with respect to hostages.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

President Trump has announced a new national security adviser replacing John Bolton, who was ousted last week. It's Robert O'Brien, a State Department official who has been responsible for negotiating the release of American hostages.

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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This morning, we are remembering the life of our friend and colleague Cokie Roberts. Cokie joined NPR in its earliest years and was a fundamental part of making it the place it is today. She worked here and at ABC News for decades.

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Veteran journalist Cokie Roberts, who joined an upstart NPR in 1978 and left an indelible imprint on the growing network with her coverage of Washington politics before later going to ABC News, has died. She was 75.

Roberts died Tuesday because of complications from breast cancer, according to a family statement.

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Who attacked Saudi Arabia's oil facilities? That question remains unanswered. But officials in Saudi Arabia now say Iranian weapons were used in the attack. And President Trump yesterday said this.

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"Saturday Night Live" has fired cast member Shane Gillis just four days after they announced he was hired. Gillis used racist and homophobic language on a podcast that he co-hosted. NPR's TV critic Eric Deggans is on the line with me. Hi, Eric.

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All right. In Russia, there were big protests over the summer in opposition to the Putin government, and the government responded by cracking down. Amnesty International called it an unprecedented attack on freedom of assembly and free speech.

Austin is about to become the first city in the U.S. to fund groups that help women who seek abortions pay for related logistical costs, such as a babysitter, a hotel room or transportation.

The move is an effort to push back against a new Texas law that went into effect Sept. 1. The state law bans local governments from giving money to groups that provide abortions — even if that money doesn't pay for the actual procedure.

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Remember those old wanted posters on TV westerns offering rewards for turning in someone wanted by the police? Well, now some families of crime victims are making their own wanted posters, offering to pay the rewards themselves. NPR's Cheryl Corley has the story.

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