Steve Inskeep

Steve Inskeep is host of NPR's Morning Edition, as well as NPR's morning news podcast Up First, along with Rachel Martin, David Greene, and Noel King.

Known for interviews with presidents and Congressional leaders, Inskeep has a passion for stories of the less famous: Pennsylvania truck drivers, Kentucky coal miners, U.S.-Mexico border detainees, Yemeni refugees, California firefighters, American soldiers.

Since joining Morning Edition in 2004, Inskeep has hosted the program from New Orleans, Detroit, San Francisco, Cairo, and Beijing; investigated Iraqi police in Baghdad; and received a Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award for "The Price of African Oil," on conflict in Nigeria. He has taken listeners on a 2,428-mile journey along the U.S.-Mexico border, and 2,700 miles across North Africa. He is a repeat visitor to Iran and has covered wars in Syria and Yemen.

Inskeep says Morning Edition works to "slow down the news," making sense of fast-moving events. A prime example came during the 2008 Presidential campaign, when Inskeep and NPR's Michele Norris conducted "The York Project," groundbreaking conversations about race, which received an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton for excellence.

Inskeep was hired by NPR in 1996. His first full-time assignment was the 1996 presidential primary in New Hampshire. He went on to cover the Pentagon, the Senate, and the 2000 presidential campaign of George W. Bush. After the Sept. 11 attacks, he covered the war in Afghanistan, turmoil in Pakistan, and the war in Iraq. In 2003, he received a National Headliner Award for investigating a military raid gone wrong in Afghanistan. He has twice been part of NPR News teams awarded the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton for coverage of Iraq.

On days of bad news, Inskeep is inspired by the Langston Hughes book, Laughing to Keep From Crying. Of hosting Morning Edition during the 2008 financial crisis and Great Recession, he told Nuvo magazine when "the whole world seemed to be falling apart, it was especially important for me ... to be amused, even if I had to be cynically amused, about the things that were going wrong. Laughter is a sign that you're not defeated."

Inskeep is the author of Instant City: Life and Death in Karachi, a 2011 book on one of the world's great megacities. He is also author of Jacksonland, a history of President Andrew Jackson's long-running conflict with John Ross, a Cherokee chief who resisted the removal of Indians from the eastern United States in the 1830s.

He has been a guest on numerous TV programs including ABC's This Week, NBC's Meet the Press, MSNBC's Andrea Mitchell Reports, CNN's Inside Politics and the PBS Newshour. He has written for publications including The New York Times, Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal, and The Atlantic.

A native of Carmel, Indiana, Inskeep is a graduate of Morehead State University in Kentucky.

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If you're looking to buy a live walrus from China, you might want to buy now.

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So what is China's next move here? It has been days now since the U.S. raised tariffs on $200 billion worth of Chinese imports.

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Chairman of the House Judiciary Committee Jerry Nadler says, quote, "we are now in a constitutional crisis."

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What are the limits of executive power? It's a question at the heart of our democracy.

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China, known as the world's biggest polluter, has been taking dramatic steps to clean up and fight climate change.

So why is it also building hundreds of coal-fired power plants in other countries?

President Xi Jinping hosted the Belt and Road Forum in Beijing over the weekend, promoting his signature foreign policy of building massive infrastructure and trade links across several continents.

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Steve Inskeep is in China, and he brings us two reports this morning. They are related. One is a story about China's Belt and Road Initiative, and the other is a story of what is happening behind the scenes of that story.

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The bottom-line findings of the Mueller report allowed President Trump to claim victory. He does not face criminal charges. Many details give critics a lot of room for questions.

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How exactly was it that a French cathedral caught fire?

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(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED CROWD: (Singing in French).

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The history of a White House proposal for migrants suggests just how serious it is or is not.

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No composition seems too difficult for pianist Lang Lang. But on his latest solo record, Piano Book, the 36-year-old known for his finger-twisting virtuosity is exploring something simpler: Beethoven's "Fur Elise," Debussy's "Clair de Lune" and other pieces that accompanied him in the first few years of a lifelong love-affair with the instrument.

Social scientist Arthur Brooks says you should really think twice before calling someone a liar.

"When you're talking to somebody else, you're not positioned to say that that person is a pathological liar," he says. "What you know, or what you believe, is that person is saying something is untrue — and that's what you should take on."

Brooks' new book is called Love Your Enemies: How Decent People Can Save America from the Culture of Contempt. It aims to guide people on different sides of the political divide to have constructive conversations.

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President Trump means to stop migration from Central America by cutting off funding that was meant to stop that migration.

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The United States caught so many people at the border this week, the Department of Homeland Security says it hardly knows what to do.

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This story is part of American Anthem, a yearlong series on songs that rouse, unite, celebrate and call to action. Find more at NPR.org/Anthem.

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This story begins in 1967, when Israel was at war with much of the Arab world. Israeli soldiers seized a patch of land from Syria. It's land President Trump now says they never need to give back.

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Gun control advocates in the United States sometimes ask, how many mass shootings will it take before the country acts? New Zealand's government has now given its own answer to that question.

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New Zealand is deciding what it will and won't do in response to a mass shooting.

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How are different countries making such different decisions about the Boeing 737 Max 8?

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The man who stood on stage with Donald Trump when he accepted the Republican nomination for president has now been sentenced to almost four years in prison.

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R&B star R. Kelly is defending himself. He's given his first interview since being charged on 10 counts of aggravated criminal sexual assault. He spoke with Gayle King of CBS News. NPR's Anastasia Tsioulcas was watching, and she's on the line. Good morning.

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