Mandalit del Barco

The Mid-Autumn Festival began Thursday in China and around the world. People celebrate the harvest moon by eating mooncakes and lighting lanterns. NPR discusses the symbolism behind the mooncake.

Children don't often get to read stories by or about Latinos. The American book publishing industry remains overwhelmingly white, according to the Cooperative Children's Book Center, which found only five percent of books published for young readers are by or about Latinx people. But several new groups of writers, editors and agents are trying to increase Latino representation in children's literature. They're working in different ways, and have their own stories to tell.

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Here in Southern California, the Bobcat Fire is still burning through the Angeles National Forest. NPR's Mandalit del Barco reports that it's threatening the Mount Wilson Observatory, home to some of the most historically important telescopes in the world.

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Dime Davis could soon become the first Black woman to win an Emmy for directing a television series, HBO's A Black Lady Sketch Show. She's also nominated as co-executive producer of the show, which is up for outstanding variety sketch series.

Recently, I sat down to talk with her by the nearly 100-year-old merry-go-round at Griffith Park in Los Angeles. "I'm really glad we did this 'cause it's better than anything we could have done in Zoom," she says. "We actually shot a few sketches here."

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Chadwick Boseman has died. The actor who played the Black Panther, Jackie Robinson and other heroes was 43 and died four years after being diagnosed with colon cancer.

NPR's Mandalit del Barco reports.

It's always been about timing with Tenet. Christopher Nolan's highly anticipated action thriller stars John David Washington as a secret agent who inverts time to try to save the world from an impending World War III.

Theaters around the country have begun showing the first new movie since the coronavirus pandemic shuttered cinemas: an audacious road rage movie titled Unhinged, starring Russell Crowe.

The $30 million dollar movie opened internationally, where it's been number one at the box office in some countries. Now it's playing in the U.S., where 70% of theaters are now open, except in Los Angeles, New York or other cities where the numbers of coronavirus cases are high.

The first new movie since the coronavirus pandemic shuttered movie theaters opens around the country on Friday. An audacious road rage movie, Unhinged stars Russell Crowe as a man who relentlessly hunts down an impatient woman after she honks and passes him at a traffic stop.

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The Walt Disney Company reported yesterday a loss of $4.7 billion in its third quarter. It also announced a surprise for its streaming service, Disney+. Here's NPR's Mandalit del Barco.

As a Black millennial father from the South, Pierce Freelon says he aims to diversify children's music.

"I don't see enough depictions of Black men as nurturers, " he says. "You know, goofy kind of caring caregivers."

The Ellen DeGeneres Show is facing a new round of serious allegations, this time of sexual harassment and misconduct against three of the daily talk show's executive producers, as well as other forms of workplace misconduct. The allegations come from 36 former Ellen DeGeneres employees.

On Thursday, DeGeneres sent a note to her staff in which she apologized for the show's reputed toxic workplace environment and pledged to do better.

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The coronavirus pandemic has reigned on next year's Rose Parade. It normally marks the start of the new year. Here's NPR's Mandalit del Barco with some more.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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As Americans celebrate Independence Day, a group of artists and activists are flying pro-immigrant, anti-incarceration messages in the skies. They hired fleets of airplanes to sky-write their slogans over 80 locations, including immigration detention facilities, jails, courts and the U.S./Mexico border.

Nikkolas Smith calls himself an "artivist": an artist and an activist. For the past seven years, the Los Angeles-based concept artist has celebrated and mourned Black lives in his work. He says he's following the lead of the late singer Nina Simone, who advised it's the artist's duty to reflect the times.

"I'm always looking at what's going in the world and trying to reflect that," Smith says. "There are so many Black lives that have just been taken from this Earth. I've been trying to trying to process how that made me feel as a Black man."

The CBS soap opera The Bold and the Beautiful resumed taping today, three months after the coronavirus pandemic shut down production in Hollywood. A spokesperson for the production company says it's the first scripted series in the country to resume work on set.

Next year's Academy Awards ceremony will be postponed for two months as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Instead of February 28, the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences and ABC announced the televised ceremony will be held now on April 25.

"For over a century, movies have played an important role in comforting, inspiring, and entertaining us during the darkest of times. They certainly have this year," academy President David Rubin and CEO Dawn Hudson said in a statement.

The cameras are once again allowed to roll in Los Angeles starting Friday, months after the coronavirus pandemic shut down Hollywood. State and county officials gave the green light for film and TV productions to resume as long as they follow new health and safety protocols.

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Feature films will no longer be able to double dip from both the Oscars and the Emmys, says the Television Academy. In a statement, the academy said it supports a recent decision by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences board of governors. That board decided to relax its rules for the 2021 Oscars in response to movie theaters being closed during the coronavirus pandemic.

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There's really no deep meaning behind the songs on Go Banana Go!'s debut album, Hi-YA! Band member Brian Wecht says the songs were mostly written with the simple goal of helpi

With movie theaters shuttered and film festivals canceled due to the coronavirus pandemic, films once slated for the big screen are now premiering in people's homes, streaming on digital platforms or showing as video on demand. In an unprecedented move, the board governing the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences will allow movies that originally had theatrical release dates but are now being screened online to be eligible to be considered for awards.

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Author Nguyen Phan Que Mai is a poet and world traveler whose first novel, The Mountains Sing, is about four generations of a Vietnamese family enduring many hardships — something she understands well.

The 47-year-old writer was born in North Vietnam, but grew up in a small village in the South, destitute, hungry and horrified by the ruins of war. "As a child, I saw so many people with missing limbs," she recalls. "I saw mothers without children, people committing suicide because their loved ones didn't come back."

Five-time Oscar-nominated cinematographer Allen Daviau, who collaborated with Steven Spielberg and other film directors, has died of COVID-19. In a statement, Spielberg said his old his friend was, "a wonderful artist, but his warmth and humanity were as powerful as his lens."

With movie theaters closed around the world because of the coronavirus pandemic, Warner Brothers is postponing the openings of some of its big summer movies, including Wonder Woman 1984. It was originally set for June 5. Now, it will hit theaters on Aug. 14.

Before movie theaters went dark and Hollywood film and TV productions were shuttered because of the coronavirus pandemic, Amazon was shooting its new billion-dollar Lord of the Rings series in New Zealand. James Cameron was there working on four sequels to Avatar. In London, Disney was about to begin filming its new live-action version of The Little Mermaid. And Warner Brothers was in Europe shooting The Matrix 4 and The Batman.

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