On Point

Weekdays 9-11 a.m.

Hear provocative voices and passionate discussion of the stories that are at the center of what is important in the world today. Leaving no perspective unchallenged, On Point digs past the surface and into the core of a subject, exposing each of its real world implications.

 

Note for listeners: You can tune into this conversation, live, via our special online stream.


 

A conversation with Mo Rocca, the humorist and CBS Sunday Morning correspondent. He’s author of the new book “Mobituaries” about overlooked lives.

How did Americans respond to what they heard? We talk with local reporters across the country about what residents are telling them.

Guests

David Smiley, political reporter for the Miami Herald. (@NewsbySmiley)

Maayan Silver, reporter for WUWM News in Milwaukee. (@maayansilver)

Tackling today’s trickiest global challenges with the winners of the Nobel Prize in Economics, Esther Duflo and Abhijit Banerjee.

The need for used items to have a secondhand life is increasing both in the U.S. and around the world. We unpack where your used, discarded and donated stuff ends up after its left your possession.

The new movie about Harriet Tubman. Historians tell us her real life was more incredible than what’s shown on the big screen.

Guests

Erica Armstrong Dunbar, Charles and Mary Beard Professor of History at Rutgers University. Author of “She Came to Slay: The Life and Times of Harriet Tubman.” (@ericaadunbar)

A conversation with the master of the historical spy novel, Alan Furst.

Jeff Sessions running for Senate. Top diplomat now recalls quid pro quo on Ukraine aid. Takeaway from state elections. The Supreme Court takes up the Clean Water Act. The roundable is here.

Guests

Karen Tumulty, Washington Post columnist who covers national politics. (@ktumulty)

Here’s an idea that will never work: replace brick-and-mortar video stores with DVDs in the mail. Well, it worked. We talk with Netflix co-founder Marc Randolph.

Guest

Marc Randolph, co-founder of Netflix. Author of “That Will Never Work: The Birth of Netflix and the Amazing Life of an Idea.” (@mbrandolph)

High-tech companies are hijacking our data, our livelihoods, our social fabric and our minds, according to Financial Times columnist Rana Foroohar. She’s with us.

We look at what state election results tell us about the power of President Trump.

Guests

Phillip M. Bailey, politics reporter for the Louisville Courier-Journal. (@phillipmbailey)

Rich Lowry, editor of the National Review, says, “Nationalism shouldn’t be a dirty word.” And he blames the right and the left for smearing the term’s true meaning.

‘Tis the season for Hallmark Christmas movies. We look at surging ratings and the growing need for feel-good TV.

Guests

Michelle Vicary, executive vice president of programming and network publicity for Crown Media Family Networks, which includes the Hallmark Channel. (@MichelleVicary)

Boeing’s CEO faces lawmakers and grieving families. What needs to change to prevent systemic failures in the future?

Guests

Natalie Kitroeff, reporter for The New York Times covering Boeing and aviation safety. (@Nataliekitro)

The gospel according to Kanye. He’s turned to God for inspiration and a new image. We take a listen.

Guests

Craig Jenkins, music critic at Vulture. (@CraigSJ)

A roundtable of Kurds in the U.S. tell us what they think of the president’s decision to withdraw troops from Syria and protect the oil fields instead of them.

Guests

Richard Engel, chief foreign correspondent for NBC News. Host of “On Assignment with Richard Engel.” (@RichardEngel)

Fires have now torched more than 74,000 acres in Northern California. At least 180,000 residents have evacuated. Millions of residents plunged into darkness from mandatory power shutoffs.

We have the latest from the frontlines and look at disaster response at the brink.

Guests

Amy Harrington, mayor of Sonoma, California.

President Trump says that Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the founder and leader of the Islamic State, has been killed. We have the latest, and look ahead to impeachment and Brexit developments.

Guests

Lisa Desjardins, correspondent for PBS NewsHour. (@LisaDNews)

Natasha Bertrand, national security correspondent for Politico. (@natashabertrand)

The musical duo Tegan and Sara return to high school. They join for a conversation about music ⁠— and growing up.

The secret sauce and spices of Sichuanese cooking. Get ready for a master class. Recipes included.

President Trump likens the impeachment inquiry to a lynching. We talk about the political weaponization of one of the darkest parts of American history.

Guests

Rep. James Clyburn, Democratic congressman from South Carolina and the House Majority Whip. He’s the highest ranking African American in the U.S. House of Representatives. (@WhipClyburn)

What Americans Think Of A Wealth Tax

Oct 23, 2019

Should the richest Americans pay more taxes, not just on what they earn, but on everything they own? We examine the case for and against a wealth tax.

From the 1920s to 1950, babies were sold on the black market from a Memphis children’s home. We unspool the sordid story and talk with survivor families.

On “Face the Nation,” moderator Margaret Brennan asks the tough questions about Beltway politics and world affairs. We turn the tables and put those questions to her.

Guest

“Face The Nation” moderator and senior foreign affairs correspondent for CBS News, Margaret Brennan (@margbrennan).

Interview Highlights

On the decision-making process when sitting down to interview someone

The latest on Brexit: leaders in the United Kingdom insist that it will happen one way or another by the Oct. 31 deadline, despite requests to the European Union for an extension.

Guest

Rob Watson, BBC World Service U.K. political correspondent. (@robwatsonbbc)

Harvey Weinstein, Matt Lauer and reporting on powerful men with a lot at stake. A conversation with Ronan Farrow.

Guest

Ronan Farrow, investigative journalist and contributing writer to The New Yorker. Author of “Catch and Kill: Lies, Spies, and a Conspiracy to Protect Predators.”(@RonanFarrow)

For decades, Rick McIntyre has been one of Yellowstone’s most dedicated and passionate wolf-watchers. And in his new book, he tells the remarkable story of Wolf 8, one of the first wolves reintroduced to Yellowstone in the mid-’90s, and how the pup went from being runt of the litter to alpha male.

Should juveniles convicted of murder ever receive life in prison without the possibility of parole? The Supreme Court looks at the case of the D.C. Sniper, and raises the question of sentencing reform in juvenile justice.

A big rethink of the fall of the Roman Empire. Was it actually an opportunity, rather than a tragedy? Our guest says Rome’s demise cleared the economic path for Europe and the creation of the modern age.

50 Years (And Counting) For 'Sesame Street'

Oct 15, 2019

Fifty years of “Sesame Street.” From Kermit to Elmo, Oscar and Big Bird, we celebrate the show that’s taught children around the world to read, laugh and love to learn.

Guests

Lloyd Morrisett, co-founder of “Sesame Street,” which first aired on Nov. 10, 1969. Co-founder of Children’s Television Workshop (since renamed Sesame Workshop), which created the show.

A meditation on character and leadership from former Supreme Allied Commander of NATO James Stavridis. The new book is “Sailing True North.”

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