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Education Desk
The Education Desk is our education blog focusing on key areas of news coverage important to the state and its improvement. Evidence of public policy performance and impact will be reported and analyzed. We encourage you to engage in commenting and discussing the coverage of education from pre-natal to Higher Ed.Dusty Rhodes curates this blog that will provide follow-up to full-length stories, links to other reports of interest, statistics, and conversations with you about the issues and stories.About - Additional Education Coverage00000179-2419-d250-a579-e41d385d0000

PARCC Pain: Preliminary Results Show Low Scores

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Illinois State Board of Education

Today, Illinois became the first state to release results of the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers -- or PARCC -- assessment. It's the new standardized test linked to the Common Core. 

The Illinois State Board of Education had to vote on what constitutes an acceptable grade on the PARCC test. That was more or less a technicality, since “cut scores” — as they’re known in education circles — had already been determined by a panel of educators from about a dozen states. But as the Illinois board members looked at the results, vice-chair Steven Gilford made one suggestion.

“Using the word cut score really bothers me. Because when I hear ‘cut score,’ i hear the people below it aren’t good enough or something," Gilford said.
And looking at the preliminary statewide results, most students wouldn’t have been deemed “good enough.” About 37 percent of students met PARCC’s expectations in language arts; fewer than 30 percent met expectations in math.
 
The board made an informal decision to replace the term "cut" with "threhold." District-level results should be available next month.

After a long career in newspapers (Dallas Observer, The Dallas Morning News, Anchorage Daily News, Illinois Times), Dusty returned to school to get a master's degree in multimedia journalism. She began work as Education Desk reporter at NPR Illinois in September 2014.
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