Politics

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The opinion section of the Boston Globe is turning heads today. They've just published a fake front page from the future that details the kind of world a President Donald Trump would usher in.

The news from April 9, 2017, includes fake stories about a market crash triggered by a trade war, the beginning of mass deportations and a story about the military refusing the orders of its civilian leadership.

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Bernie Sanders added to his winning streak in Wyoming last night, increasing the pressure on Hillary Clinton ahead of New York's primary.

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Former Mexican President Vicente Fox is a fierce critic of presidential candidate Donald Trump, repeatedly denouncing what he says are his "racist and ignorant ideas." Trump "says that he'll make America great again," Fox writes this week in The Guardian, "but I believe he's only making it worse."

On the way into the Colorado Republican Party's state convention in Colorado Springs Saturday morning, a Ted Cruz supporter waved a big broom with the letters "CRUZ" fastened to the top.

The convention took place in a hockey arena, and the prop is probably familiar to most sports fans. The Cruz supporter was looking for a sweep, and a sweep was what he got.

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This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. We'll start the program today looking at two presidential contests playing out in the West. Bernie Sanders has won the Democratic caucuses in Wyoming. He celebrated with supporters at a rally on Long Island, N.Y.

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In the way only he can, former President Bill Clinton has walked back his confrontation with Black Lives Matter protesters earlier this week.

The Republican presidential primary race is revolving entirely around the Broadmoor World Arena in Colorado Springs, Colo., on Saturday.

That's where Colorado Republicans are meeting to elect 13 statewide delegates to this summer's Republican National Convention.

In a contest that takes 1,237 delegates to win the nomination, 13 – or even the full 37 Colorado will send to Cleveland — may seem like a minuscule total.

Democratic voters in Wyoming have decided: Sen. Bernie Sanders has won the state's caucuses, according to The Associated Press. But the victory over Hillary Clinton will not ensure Sanders more delegates. The state's 14 delegates will be split evenly between the two candidates.

​Hillary for America Campaign Manager Robby Mook released the following statement on Clinton's tie in pledged delegates in Wyoming:

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The NPR Politics team is back with its weekly roundup of political news. The team explains the state of the primary race as it moves to New York, following wins in Wisconsin for Bernie Sanders and Ted Cruz.

The team also discusses why the gloves are coming off in the Democratic race and partakes in some taste testing of wine ice cream that was inspired by Hillary Clinton.

On the podcast:

  • Campaign Reporter Sam Sanders
  • White House Correspondent Tamara Keith

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Politics, schmolitics (ph) time for sports.

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The things they do for love.

Politicians will eat almost any food, adopt any colloquialism, endure any level of awkward — just to seem "authentic."

The latest example? Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, riding the New York subway through the Bronx, saying hi to babies and taking selfies along the way.

Depending on your point of view, the event — and it was an event — could be viewed as either a shining testament to Clinton's New York bona fides, or just the latest example of how out of touch she is.

Here's how it all happened.

To Bernie Sanders supporters, the idea that Democratic superdelegates — elected officials and other party elites who can vote however they wish at the convention — could tip the nomination to Hillary Clinton seems terribly undemocratic.

And so, they're trying to convince superdelegates, officially known as unpledged party leaders and elected officials, to change their allegiance.

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NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with our regular political commentators E.J. Dionne of the Washington Post and Brookings Institution and David Brooks of The New York Times. They discuss the Wisconsin primary and the flurry of "religious freedom" bill

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At a campaign event in Philadelphia on Thursday in support of his wife's presidential bid, Bill Clinton responded to protesters in a way that has since been described as "peak white mansplain."

Bill Clinton on Friday stopped short of saying he was sorry for a recent clash with Black Lives Matter protesters. Instead, the former president tried to make the squabble into a teachable moment.

"I did something yesterday in Philadelphia I almost want to apologize for, but I want to use it as an example of the danger threatening our country," he told the crowd at a Hillary Clinton campaign event in Erie, Pa.

Bernie Sanders will be taking a few days off the campaign trail to attend a Vatican conference about social, economic and environmental issues.

The day after a debate in New York next week, Sanders will travel to Rome for the event.

In an interview on MSNBC's Morning Joe, Sanders said he was "a big, big fan of the pope."

"He has played an unbelievable role, unbelievable role in injecting a moral consequence into the economy," Sanders said. "He's talking about the idolatry of money, the worship of money, the greed that's out there."

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