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It's a beer with a message — and its brewers say it's a simple one. Responding to North Carolina's HB2 law that voids cities' anti-discrimination rules, two of the state's brewers are creating a new beer: the Don't Be Mean to People: A Golden Rule Saison.

HBO's new movie Confirmation chronicles the intense confirmation battle for Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas after Anita Hill, a former employee, claimed he sexually harassed her.

NPR's Nina Totenberg broke the story to the world in 1991, and she joins the NPR Politics podcast team to reflect on what happened, how it happened and why it still matters.

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House Speaker Paul Ryan has said what he is not going to do. Let's ask what he is up to.

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Ryan told reporters yesterday the Republican Party should not draft him as a presidential candidate.

John Kasich says the nation has a choice between "two paths." On one path is "fear" and "darkness." On the other path is — guess who? — a President Kasich.

In a speech on Tuesday, Kasich presented a stark choice between pessimism and optimism. The "path to darkness," he said, is a "political strategy based on exploiting Americans instead of lifting them up [that] inevitably leads to divisions, paranoia, isolation, and promises that can never, ever be fulfilled."

To understand the economy, you have to do a lot of measuring. What's bigger? What's growing? What's unequal?

On national Equal Pay Day, women and economists take a hard look at incomes. And their measurements show that after decades of the equal-rights battles, men still get bigger paychecks — sometimes for the same work.

Donald Trump hopes to win big in next week's New York Republican presidential primary. Although Trump is fond of saying how he never loses, the billionaire suffered a defeat in his backyard when he sought to build a huge restaurant and banquet hall on Jones Beach, a public beach 40 miles east of New York City on Long Island.

The architect of Trump's defeat was Pat Friedman.

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If you don't live in Baltimore, but you know anything about the mayor's race, it's probably that an activist with Black Lives Matter is running. He's known as the guy in the blue vest, but he also goes by DeRay Mckesson. Mckesson is the city's highest-profile mayoral candidate, but one of the lowest in the polls.

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House Speaker Paul Ryan held a news conference in Washington today to put to rest speculation that he could somehow emerge as the Republican nominee for president. NPR congressional reporter Susan Davis is on the line with us now. Hi, Susan.

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Editor's note: Since this story was first published, the Missouri bill has moved out of committee and could be taken up by the state senate before the legislative session ends Friday. A filibuster is expected, if the bill makes it to the senate floor.

At Richard Logan's pharmacy in Charleston, Mo., prescription opioid painkillers are locked away in a cabinet.

Early this year, President Obama granted clemency to seven men with ties to Iran, part of a high-profile prisoner swap that left some in federal law enforcement circles seeing red. Among the detainees who won release were men accused of breaking export-control laws by shipping sensitive materials to Iran.

But this month, the Justice Department signaled it remains determined to bring cases over export violations, even if it takes a long while for justice.

If Republican Party delegates are looking for an alternative to Donald Trump, Ted Cruz or John Kasich, it won't be Paul Ryan.

"I want to put this to rest once and for all," Ryan said of speculation that he could be chosen as the Republican presidential nominee this summer in a multiballot convention.

Politicians, take note: Don't eat on camera, don't wear funny looking hats, don't sing, don't rap ... and, generally speaking, don't try to be funny. You will regret it. You will especially regret it if your very lame joke could be interpreted as racially insensitive.

Three of the five candidates on both sides of the aisle hail from New York in some way or another, so which candidate truly has a home court advantage is questionable.

But, demographics might offer a clue.

Historical and current U.S. Census data suggest that New York's demographics are unusual compared with other states that have already voted this primary season. No doubt, New Yorkers have their own state of mind, but, a few demographic trends help us understand the electorate.

A few things to watch:

1. Urban

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A statement by the CIA director has further cracked open a debate about America's recent past. It's a debate over what U.S. intelligence agencies did to gain information and whether they would do it again.

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Police needed most of Monday afternoon to arrest all of the sit-down protesters outside the U.S. Capitol in Washington at a demonstration in favor of changing the rules on political money, voting rights and redistricting.

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has charged Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton with securities fraud for allegedly improperly recruiting investors for a high-tech Texas startup.

NPR's Wade Goodwyn reports for our Newscast unit that the federal civil lawsuit accuses Paxton — then a member of the Texas House of Representatives — of defrauding investors when he promoted the tech startup Servergy Inc., without disclosing that he was being paid to do so. Wade says:

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The last time there was a contested convention, when the nominee wasn't known going into the convention, was 40 years ago.

Back then, incumbent President Gerald Ford led Ronald Reagan, but he didn't quite have a majority. That changed before the first ballot at the convention. How? Rides on Air Force One, state dinners, and ... persuasion.

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A listener named Josh recently sent us a clip of him talking politics with his daughter, Penelope. The bit that caught our attention (and that we highlighted in our last weekly roundup podcast) was where Penelope finds out that a "girl" is running for president, then insists that her father vote for her.

He presses Penelope on this:

"What if I said I'm voting for Ted Cruz just because he's a man?" he asks.

"If he was the first man to be president," she says.

Wyoming is sometimes called the Equality State — it had the nation's first female governor and was the first territory to give women the right to vote. But that legacy isn't visible on the floor of the state Senate. Just one of the 30 state senators is a woman.

"I am the queen of the Senate. I have my own little tiara," jokes Bernadine Craft, a Democrat who represents the mining town of Rock Springs.

President Obama has cut a nuclear deal with Iran. He has scolded North Korea for its provocative nuclear tests. And he has hosted a series of global nuclear security summits in Washington.

Now there's speculation the president may visit Hiroshima, Japan, site of the world's first atomic bombing, which hastened the end of World War II more than 70 years ago.

There's a strong argument to be made that Chicago's South Side is the cultural capital of black America, a place that a far-reaching who's who of black luminaries have called home — Mahalia Jackson, Louis Armstrong, Ida B. Wells, Barack Obama. But even as the South Side has played a key role in the Great Migration, it was and continues to be shaped by entrenched segregation that has choked it off from resources and development.

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It's been 40 years or so since a national political convention had even a little suspense. Everyone usually knows long before the conventions open exactly who each party's nominee will be.

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