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Updated at 3:15 p.m.

President Trump, in his first public remarks in the wake of a U.S. strike that killed Iranian Maj. Gen. Qassem Soleimani, defended the action as necessary to protect national security.

"We took action last night to stop a war. We did not take action to start a war," Trump said Friday afternoon from his Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida.

As other candidates report significant increases in fundraising, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren raised $21.2 million in the final three months of 2019, according to her presidential campaign, a drop from the $24.7 million she raised in the previous fundraising period.

The figure is also less than the totals that Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, former Vice President Joe Biden and former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg took in between September and December.

Campaigns are reporting fundraising in three-month windows.

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Looking back on it now, we can see there was a warning of the airstrike that hit Baghdad overnight.

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As President Trump's impeachment trial approaches, Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, is under close scrutiny from Democrats and her fellow Republicans ahead of a vote that could once again test her reputation for centrism and independence.

The spotlight on Collins has come a bit earlier than expected.

In the narrowly divided Senate, just four Republicans could force Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to reconsider his vow for a speedy acquittal and "total coordination" with the Trump White House.

Democrats all want one thing: to beat Donald Trump.

The problem is, they can't agree on who's best to do that. With a month to go until the Iowa caucuses, there's a clear top tier of four candidates: former Vice President Joe Biden, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren and Pete Buttigieg, former mayor of South Bend, Ind.

During the final presidential debate of 2019, one of the moderators posed a question about a topic that rarely gets attention on the debate stage: What steps would candidates take to help disabled people get more integrated into the workforce and their local communities?

For Andrew Yang, the question was both political and personal. His oldest son, Christopher, is on the autism spectrum.

Updated at 4:27 a.m. ET Friday

U.S. forces assassinated Iranian Maj. Gen. Qassem Soleimani in an airstrike early Friday near the Baghdad International Airport, an escalation of tensions between Washington and Tehran that is prompting concerns of further violence in the region.

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Democratic presidential contender Andrew Yang talks openly and frequently about his son Christopher, who's on the autism spectrum. Here's Yang during the most recent Democratic debate.

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How Should We Regulate Homeschooling?

Jan 2, 2020

People choose to homeschool their children for a variety of reasons. Maybe they want their child to focus on a certain part of the curriculum. Maybe their child has special needs. Maybe their child has a hard time learning in a classroom environment.

But whatever the reason, there are still guidelines for how a child can be homeschooled.

In April of 2016, then-presidential candidate Donald Trump made his first-ever major foreign policy address to the conservative Center for National Interest.

In it, candidate Trump slammed President Barack Obama for pulling troops out of Iraq, for failing to adhere to a “red line” in Syria and for “picking fights with our oldest friends.”

A lot has changed in American foreign policy since Trump took the stage in 2016.

Updated at 2:06 p.m. ET

A three-month window that began with a heart attack ended as Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders' strongest fundraising quarter yet.

Sanders' campaign announced it raised $34.5 million in October, November and December — nearly $10 million more than he had raised in the previous quarter. According to the campaign, $18 million came in from 900,000 individual donations in December alone, as Sanders drew larger and larger crowds to rallies in early voting states such as Iowa and New Hampshire.

Julián Castro Ends His Presidential Bid

Jan 2, 2020

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Updated at 10:30 a.m. ET

Julián Castro, the only Latino candidate in the Democratic field, has ended his presidential campaign.

Castro released a video on Twitter on Thursday, saying that his campaign had "stood up for the most vulnerable people" and had "given a voice to those who are often forgotten."

He adds in the video: "I'm not done fighting. I'll keep working toward a nation where everyone counts."

Castro served as secretary of housing and urban development in the Obama administration and, before that, was mayor of San Antonio, Texas.

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How much worse are Australia's bushfires than in the past? And what's that country want to do about it?

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With the new year come many new state laws across the country. There are the usual suspects — gun laws, marijuana legalization and housing protections — but there are also some new frontiers: groundbreaking laws concerning Internet user privacy and the classification of contract workers in California, for example.

Here are some of the most notable laws taking effect Jan. 1, in no particular order:

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1A’s goal is to act as a national mirror — taking time to help America look at itself and to ask what it wants to be. That means talking and listening to the people that the national media often just likes to talk about.

That’s why we launched our project 1A Across America in collaboration with six public radio stations around the nation last fall.

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Our first story of the New Year takes us to the Middle East. We're keeping a close eye on the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad.

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Don't put too much stock in all those New Year's predictions you're hearing and seeing about American politics in 2020. Anyone saying they know what will happen is probably just trying to get our attention.

And probably succeeding. We've all fallen for headlines and clickbait proclaiming foreknowledge of events. We do it for sports, the stock market and just about any other outcome that cannot be foreseen.

That goes for elections — especially for elections — and particularly in a high-stakes, pivotal cycle such as we are in now.

President Trump and his Russian counterpart have the coming year to deal with an expiring nuclear treaty that will lapse just after the end of his first term.

Trump hasn't ruled out renewing the treaty, known as New START. But he has made it clear that he would rather strike a bigger deal that includes different kinds of nuclear weapons — and that also brings China into the fold.

The annual population growth rate of the United States over the past year continued a decades-long decline, dropping to its lowest level in the past century.

According to newly released estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau, the U.S. population grew by 1,552,022 since 2018, an increase of one-half of one percent.

After “Saturday Night Live” parodied the president in December 2018, Donald Trump tweeted that the show “should be tested in courts, can’t be legal?”

In fact, the right to mock presidents, preachers and other public figures already had been tested in the courts.

In 1983, Hustler Magazine published a joke so offensive that it made it all the way to the Supreme Court.

A top Trump administration official has been criticized for saying on Monday that the man charged with stabbing five people at a Hanukkah celebration in New York was the son of an "illegal alien" and came from a family that lacked "American values."

Ken Cuccinelli, the acting director of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, made the comments in a now-deleted tweet about suspect Grafton Thomas.

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