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FBI's director will testify before Senate panel about the insurrection. Georgia House passes bill that would limit absentee and early voting. House panel investigates health care provider One Medical.

The U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments Tuesday in a major voting rights case that could give state legislatures a green light to change voting laws, making it more difficult for some to vote.

Congress passed the Voting Rights Act in 1965 — a law that today is widely viewed as the most successful civil rights law in the nation's history. But in 2013, the Supreme Court gutted a key provision: no longer would state and local governments with a history of racial discrimination in voting have to get pre-clearance from the Justice Department before making changes in voting procedures.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

College students in Montana will soon be able to carry concealed firearms on campus without a permit. Yellowstone Public Radio's Kevin Trevellyan reports.

Updated at 6:41 p.m. ET

FBI Director Christopher Wray on Tuesday condemned the attack on the U.S. Capitol as "domestic terrorism," defended the bureau's handling of intelligence about potential threats ahead of the event and rejected conspiracy theories blaming left-wing extremists for the violence on Jan. 6.

Millions of people watched the moon landing live on TV in 1969. But more than 50 years later, Bonnie Garland still isn't buying it.

"I personally do not believe that man has ever been out of the atmosphere," says Garland, a self-described housewife from Tucson, Ariz. "I'm a very inquisitive person. Always have been. So I question everything."

The U.S. Department of Education will have a new leader. Late Monday, in a 64 to 33 vote, the U.S. Senate confirmed Miguel Cardona to be the next Secretary of Education.

Over objections from Democrats, Georgia House Republicans passed a sweeping elections bill that would enact more restrictions for absentee voting and cut back on weekend early voting hours favored by larger counties, among other changes.

ROME — The second Roman Catholic president in American history is a devout man who makes no secret of the importance of faith in his life. President Joe Biden is a regular churchgoer, often quotes St. Augustine and carries a rosary that belonged to his late son Beau. In one of the first images released of him in the Oval Office, a photo was visible behind his desk showing him with Pope Francis.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

In Yemen, 50,000 people are already starving. Sixteen million could go hungry this year. Those were the grim facts presented today at a U.N. donor conference. Yemen has been devastated by a war that began in 2014 - fighting between the rebel Houthi government and pro-government forces led by Saudi Arabia. Now President Biden says U.S. support for the Saudi-led offensive will end. And Secretary of State Tony Blinken has promised an additional $191 million in humanitarian aid.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

In Yemen, 50,000 people are already starving. Sixteen million could go hungry this year. Those were the grim facts presented today at a U.N. donor conference. Yemen has been devastated by a war that began in 2014 - fighting between the rebel Houthi government and pro-government forces led by Saudi Arabia. Now President Biden says U.S. support for the Saudi-led offensive will end. And Secretary of State Tony Blinken has promised an additional $191 million in humanitarian aid.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

In Yemen, 50,000 people are already starving. Sixteen million could go hungry this year. Those were the grim facts presented today at a U.N. donor conference. Yemen has been devastated by a war that began in 2014 - fighting between the rebel Houthi government and pro-government forces led by Saudi Arabia. Now President Biden says U.S. support for the Saudi-led offensive will end. And Secretary of State Tony Blinken has promised an additional $191 million in humanitarian aid.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

New York's attorney general is proceeding with an investigation into the allegations of sexual harassment made against Gov. Andrew Cuomo. The governor's office authorized the probe, clearing the way for the hiring of an independent law firm to conduct the inquiry.

Updated at 5 p.m. ET

Hundreds of migrant children still separated from their parents by the Trump administration may be allowed to reunite with their families in the United States — and some families may have the opportunity to stay, Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas announced on Monday.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo agreed to an independent investigation of allegations by former staffers of sexual harassment, amid mounting criticism of his leadership style and handling of the pandemic.

Senate takes up the COVID-19 relief package. New York Gov. Cuomo promises to comply with an investigation into allegations of workplace harassment. Myanmar marks its most violent day since the coup.

Amazon warehouse workers in Alabama voting to unionize won the backing of an important executive.

Without naming the massive e-commerce company specifically, President Biden said in a video posted late Sunday that he supports the organizing drive in Bessemer, Ala.

One day before the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol in January, thousands of miles away in northern California, anger began to boil over at a meeting of the Shasta County Board of Supervisors.

"This is a scamdemic, it's a plandemic, and it's a damndemic. We're sick of it!" one woman shouted.

The House early Saturday passed President Biden's $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package. Now the measure heads to the Senate.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

And I am in the suburbs of Washington. I'm just turning. I'm just about to turn up this steep asphalt hill. This looks like your typical suburban office park, but just around the corner, we're about to hit a security check. That is because this is the headquarters of U.S. intelligence. And we are here to interview the woman in charge. That would be Avril Haines. Having worked over the years at the State Department, the White House, the No. 2 job at the CIA, she took over in January as the director of national intelligence.

While conspiracy theories aren't new, experts say their reach is spreading — accelerated by social media, encouraged by former President Donald Trump and weaponized in a way that is unprecedented.

The Senate takes up President Biden's $1.9 trillion coronavirus aid package this week, following a largely party-line House vote early Saturday morning.

Democrats are using a process to avoid a Republican filibuster in the Senate that leaves them no room for error in the divided 50-50 chamber.

Updated at 8:10 p.m. ET

Just a month after leaving office, Donald Trump on Sunday broke with the practices of past former presidents and took on the man who beat him in the 2020 election.

During a keynote address that lasted an hour and a half — and began more than an hour late — in Orlando, Fla., to the friendly Conservative Political Action Conference, or CPAC, Trump blasted Biden's tenure so far.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Disinformation is not just affecting politics at the national level. It's eroding public trust in institutions.

The Future Of The GOP In Texas

Feb 28, 2021

The U.S. Border Immigration Problem

Feb 28, 2021

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

* How do you have a humane immigration policy that does not encourage illegal immigration? President Biden is grappling with just that question. Biden is already facing criticism over decisions to deport migrants and open a temporary shelter at the border as he seeks to reverse the draconian policies of his predecessor. To talk more about the challenges ahead is Doris Meissner. She is a senior fellow and director at the Migration Policy Institute.

Hello.

DORIS MEISSNER: Hello.

Former President Donald Trump speaks today at the Conservative Political Action Conference in Florida. As Trump's grip tightens on the GOP, President Joe Biden continues to address U.S. border policy.

Republican-led legislatures in dozens of states are moving to change election laws in ways that could make it harder to vote.

Many proposals explicitly respond to the 2020 election: Lawmakers cite public concerns about election security — concerns generated by disinformation that then-President Donald Trump spread while trying to overturn the election.

The release of a U.S. intelligence report finding that Saudi Arabia's crown prince had approved the 2018 killing of Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi is prompting calls for penalties against the man next in line to the Saudi throne.

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