Lauren Underwood

Rep. Lauren Underwood announcing her intention to vote to impeach President Trump in a speech on the floor of the U.S. House
U.S. House of Representatives

Freshman Illinois Congresswoman Lauren Underwood says she will vote to impeach President Donald Trump.

TV ads targeting Reps. Adam Kinzinger, left, and Lauren Underwood, right. Pictured are President Donald Trump and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.
illustration by Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois

As members of the U.S. House of Representatives prepare to vote on whether to impeach President Trump this week, Republican interest groups have been waging an ad war in selected districts across the country, including in Illinois.

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Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois

Republicans are lining up to try to reclaim the seats won by freshmen U.S. Reps. Sean Casten and Lauren Underwood, there are fights over a suburban business emitting a cancer-causing chemical, the feds are inching up on the speaker, and more.

Sarah Jesmer / WNIJ

This week’s election was expected to bring a second “Year of the Woman” to American politics.

After Tuesday, here’s what that looks like in Illinois: The state’s congressional delegation added one woman, and there will be at least one, maybe up to three, more women serving in Springfield come January.

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Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois

In the final days of the 2018 elections, Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner and Democratic nominee J.B. Pritzker are making their closing arguments.

National politicians like President Donald Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden were also in Illinois in the last week, mostly to stump for Congressional candidates as Democrats and Republicans vie for control of the U.S. House.

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Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois

Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner and his Democratic challenger, J.B. Pritzker, met in Quincy Thursday for the third and final debate of the 2018 elections. Did voters learn anything about either man’s policy preferences?

Plus, Illinois Democrats are trying to pick up as many as four Republican-held seats in the U.S. House of Representatives. And a new report says Chicago’s racial divides are holding back the city’s economy.

Rodney Davis speaks with reporters after an event with Democratic Sen. Dick Durbin, at a church in Springfield
Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois

Recent ratings from political analysts downgraded the likelihood that two Republican Congressmen in Illinois will win re-election.

In an off-presidential year, it’s no secret that candidates from the president’s party have a tougher time winning races. That’s one reason a project from the University of Virginia Center for Politics moved the re-election campaigns of Congressmen Rodney Davis and Randy Hultgren one notch closer to a toss-up.