Jehan Gordon-Booth

Cassidy debate
Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois

Illinois is poised to become the 11th state to legalize recreational marijuana after lawmakers approved a massive 610-page proposal that is touted as one of the most equitable in the country. 

cannabis ladies
State Sen. Heather Steans / State Sen. Heather Steans

Earlier in May when language for Illinois' recreational cannabis proposal was unveiled, it was Gov. J.B. Pritzker who stole the headlines, receiving much of the credit. While it's his signature that will ultimately appear on any proposal passed by the legislature, it was four female lawmakers who chose to embark on the difficult path to legalization years ago. 

Jaclyn Driscoll / NPR Illinois

Politicians spearheading the effort to legalize recreational marijuana say revenue isn’t the driving force. It’s about promoting justice for people of color who have been unfairly targeted by the war on drugs. But, the lack of diversity and transparency in Illinois’ medical marijuana program causes some concern.

Bob Daiber, state Sen. Daniel Biss, J.B. Pritzker, Tio Hardiman, and Chris Kennedy
Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois

Five of the six Democrats running for governor were in Peoria over the Martin Luther King Day weekend. They were making largely similar cases to voters at a forum on criminal and economic justice.

Matt Jones, Peter Baroni, Jehan Gordon-Booth
Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

As Chicago confronts an increasing murder rate, the Illinois legislature is trying to take on the root causes of violence in some of the state's most traumatized communities.

advocates confront Ken Dunkin
Amanda Vinicky / WUIS

Gov. Bruce Rauner is standing by his decision to backtrack on cuts to a low-income daycare program. That comes even as Democrats in the Illinois House failed to pass legislation that would have forced Rauner to undo his changes.

The program is meant to help parents out of poverty by subsidizing daycare, so they can work or go to school.

Rauner unilaterally slashed eligibility this summer. After months of outcry and a Democratic threat to pass legislation undoing his changes, Rauner on Monday announced he'd back off most of the cuts.

Amanda Vinicky

Low-income, working parents are fighting to once again get help from the state for childcare.

A stretch of central Illinois road may be re-named after one of baseball's greats.

The Illinois House has adopted a resolution that would designate a section of Route 24 in and near Peoria as the "Jim Thome Highway."

Thome hails from Peoria, and went on to a successful Major League Baseball career.

The area's State Rep. Jehan Gordon-Booth, a Democrat, says Thome was a prolific hitter. He was on the Chicago White Sox when he reached the sluggers' gold standard of hitting 500 home runs.

police cars
flickr.com/appleswitch (Creative Commons)

The question of just what happened in Ferguson, Missouri before the shooting death of Michael Brown has renewed a push in Illinois to equip police with cameras.

Body and dashboard cameras for police isn't a new idea;  President of the Illinois's NAACP chapter, George Mitchell, says his organization has been supportive of the concept as far back as 2001.

But he says Ferguson shows why. Mitchell says had the Brown incident been on tape, much of the controversy could have been avoided.

The stepson of a state lawmaker from Peoria has been shot dead.

The (Peoria) Journal Star reports (http://bit.ly/1t6ts30 ) that 22-year-old Derrick Booth Jr. was pronounced dead early Saturday at OSF Saint Francis Medical Center.

He was the stepson of Democratic Rep. Jehan Gordon-Booth and the son of Manual Academy basketball coach Derrick Booth Sr.

The newspaper reports that the victim was found on the porch of a home with a gunshot wound to the chest.

It was the second homicide in the city this year.

  In a speech that could be pivotal for both his re-election campaign and for the state's finances, Governor Pat Quinn will Wednesday present his annual budget proposal. His administration is tight-lipped about what he has in mind. 

Illinois lawmakers — at least most of them — have agreed the state has about $35 billion dollars to spend next year.

But as House Republican Leader Jim Durkin says,

"How we distribute that money and divvy it up is a whole different analysis."