Cristina Castro

Illinois Gov. J.B. addresses a joint session of the Illinois House and Senate.
handout / Illinois Office of Communication and Information

Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker is already making plans to spend money from a significant change in the state income tax, even though it can only happen if voters agree to amend the Illinois Constitution this November.

A significant chunk of Pritzker’s annual budget proposal, delivered Wednesday, depends on the governor's graduated income tax.

Witnesses testify about ethics laws in Illinois and elsewhere at a meeting of the Illinois Joint Commission on Ethics and Lobbying Reform
Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois

A day after Gov. J.B. Pritzker called for a massive culture change over corruption in Illinois, state lawmakers were considering how to make that happen — especially when it comes to local units of government.

landlordleaseforms via CC0 1.0

Immigrants to Illinois are now able to sue their landlords if they are evicted because of their citizenship status.


flickr/Charles Edward Miller/https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/

The governor signed the measures in Chicago flanked by advocates who say the state must be a welcoming place for all.  

Tatiana Vdb - Flickr / CC-by 2.0

Women in the Illinois Senate want to address a surge in maternal deaths related to childbirth.

Dana Vollmer / NPR Illinois

Illinois nurses are calling on state lawmakers to restrict the number of patients under their care.

Twitter Cristina Castro- @senatorcastro

Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner vetoed a plan last week that would bar employers from asking about salary history. Now, some lawmakers say these actions could impact the governor’s race in which Rauner is vying for a second term.

Moody Air Force Base via Creative Commons / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

People caught texting and driving on Illinois roadways could risk losing their licenses under a measure being considered by state lawmakers.  It’s part of a statewide effort against distracted driving. 

 

The proposed rule change would up the ante on anyone who breaks the state’s distracted driving law. Instead of just a ticket or warning, anyone who’s caught texting and driving would be hit with a moving violation. 

Those are the kind of tickets that count as strikes against your driving record; after three, your license gets suspended.