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The three white men accused in the death of Ahmaud Arbery, a Black man who was shot while he was jogging through a Glynn County, Ga., neighborhood this year, were indicted by a grand jury Wednesday.

Gregory and Travis McMichael, a father and son, as well as William "Roddie" Bryan, were charged in May in the Feb. 23 killing of Arbery.

Cobb County District Attorney Joyette Holmes announced the indictment on nine counts, including malice murder, felony murder and criminal attempt to commit false imprisonment.

An Internet shutdown that began a year ago in parts of Myanmar is keeping some villages unaware of the coronavirus pandemic, humanitarian groups say.

Restrictions on mobile Internet were put in place in eight townships in the state of Rakhine – and one in nearby Chin state — in June of last year amid fighting between the country's military and an ethnic minority, the Rakhine, and their Arakan Army.

Stock prices took another nosedive Wednesday, amid fears that a spike in coronavirus cases in parts of the Sunbelt could force the economy into another lockdown.

The major stock indexes finished the day down more than 2%, as investors grappled with evidence that the economy may not rebound as fast as they'd expected.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average lost 770 points, a drop of more than 2.7%.

Shares of companies that have been especially hard hit by the pandemic, such as homebuilders and cruise lines, lost ground, as did bank stocks.

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The company Bayer announced today that it will pay roughly $10 billion to people who say they got cancer after using the company's most widely used weed killer. NPR's Dan Charles has that story.

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On Friday, the California Sleep Society will hold an online memorial for a man called the father of sleep medicine.

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A week before President Trump held his controversial campaign rally in Tulsa, Okla., was when Viviana Dark, a K-pop fan from Wisconsin (who has requested pseudonymity over concerns of online harassment), first heard of plans to "sabotage" the event. Users on TikTok, the exceptionally popular social-video platform, were urging others to reserve tickets to the rally, with no intention of actually going. "You know how a TikTok challenge happens? It was kind of like that. 'Everybody go do this!' And it spread like wildfire," Dark, 19, tells NPR Music.

The 2020 New York City Marathon has been canceled, organizers announced on Wednesday.

The decision to shutter the race, which is the world's largest marathon and one of the city's marquee events, was due to "coronavirus-related health and safety concerns," according to a statement from the organizer, New York Road Runners.

Schools around the country are trying to figure out how they may safely reopen this fall while having to navigate safety protocols to limit the spread of the coronavirus.

In Sausalito, California, one school just piloted three weeks of in-person classes. KQED’s Julia McEvoy has the story.

This article was originally published on WBUR.org.

NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to discuss the latest in politics, including primary election results in five states on Tuesday.

This article was originally published on WBUR.org.

Doctors think that plasma from individuals who have recovered from COVID-19 may be able help those who are fighting the disease. It’s a treatment that has worked in other situations.

WBUR’s Carey Goldberg reports on one of the early patients to get the potential treatment.

The European Union is making a list of countries whose travelers will be allowed to visit this summer — and for now at least, the U.S. doesn't seem likely to meet the criteria based on its recent coronavirus numbers.

The United States has the most cases of any country in the world, and many states are reporting sharp rises in new cases as they ease shutdown orders.

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So what do you do when you're a professional cyclist and COVID-19 has put the racing season on hold? Well, you could just sit around, or you could, say, bike the equivalent height of Mount Everest. That is what Lachlan Morton did.

Updated 9:05 p.m. ET Wednesday

Police in Detroit were trying to figure out who stole five watches from a Shinola retail store. Authorities say the thief took off with an estimated $3,800 worth of merchandise.

Investigators pulled a security video that had recorded the incident. Detectives zoomed in on the grainy footage and ran the person who appeared to be the suspect through facial recognition software.

A hit came back: Robert Julian-Borchak Williams, 42, of Farmington Hills, Mich., about 25 miles northwest of Detroit.

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A powerful earthquake struck a huge swath of southern and central Mexico yesterday. At least five people were killed. The quake hit midmorning, and despite its punch in the wide area affected, damage was surprisingly moderate. NPR's Carrie Kahn reports from Mexico City.

New U.S. Agency for Global Media CEO Michael Pack swept into office like a man on a mission last week, firing the top executives and advisory boards of federally funded international broadcasters which weekly reach 340 million people abroad. A new lawsuit alleges he broke federal law in doing so.

Updated June 24 at 10:17 p.m. ET

The Trump administration is adding two new political appointees to the U.S. Census Bureau, raising concerns among some Democrats and the country's largest professional association of statisticians about partisan interference with the ongoing national head count.

A powerful earthquake struck Mexico's southern Oaxaca region on Tuesday, killing at least five people and shaking buildings hundreds of miles away.

The 7.4-magnitude quake struck mid-morning, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. Its epicenter was off the Pacific coast about seven miles southwest of Santa María Zapotitlán, near the beach resort of Huatulco.

Major League Baseball and its Players Association have reached an agreement to play a shortened season this year. The MLB Players Association made the announcement first via tweet.

In a subsequent news release, MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred said players will report to spring training on July 1 and the regular season is to begin either on July 23 or 24. Instead of the typical 162-game regular season, teams will play just 60 games.

NASCAR driver Bubba Wallace was not the target of a hate crime, according to the FBI.

A day-long investigation by 15 special agents into the discovery of a noose in Wallace's garage at the Talledega Superspeedway revealed that the rope had been in the stall since at least October.

Former President Barack Obama joined his former vice president, Joe Biden, on a virtual fundraiser on Tuesday evening as top-level Democrats seek to consolidate voters around the party's 2020 presumptive nominee.

"I am here to say the help is on the way if we do the work, because there's nobody I trust more to be able to heal this country and get back on track than my dear friend Joe Biden," Obama told supporters on the video conference.

A pandemic is hard on everyone. And even though older people face greater risks from the novel coronavirus, a UNICEF report released on Tuesday points to another particularly vulnerable population: youth. The report is titled Lives Upended: How COVID-19 threatens the futures of 600 million South Asian children.

Segway's iconic personal transporter is nearing the end of its ride, company officials announced on Tuesday.

President Judy Cai said in a statement that production of the Segway PT will stop on July 15, less than two decades after the scooter was first unveiled. She described the two-wheeled, self-balancing vehicle as a "staple" in security and law enforcement, and noted its popularity among travelers worldwide.

Update at 6:02 p.m. ET

"Today, Texas will report an all-time high in the number of cases of people testing positive" for the coronavirus, Gov. Greg Abbott said Tuesday, adding that for the first time, his state would surpass 5,000 new cases in a single day.

Hours later, the Texas Department of State Health Services reported 5,489 new cases.

A banner promoting LGBTQ pride was temporarily taken down from the U.S. Embassy on Tuesday after the city's deputy mayor complained about it, claiming it was offensive to residents.

The banner was rehung Tuesday night following media coverage and discussions between the embassy and city officials.

The coronavirus pandemic has left tens of millions of people without a safety net. Naida Lavon is one of them.

Lavon is 67 years old, a retired school bus driver, and she was recently furloughed from her part-time job at Avis Rent-a-Car. In March, she also found herself without a home so she started living in her minivan on the streets of Portland, Ore. For the past few months, Lavon has been keeping an audio diary of her experience being newly homeless.

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