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Conditions are growing increasingly dire in the Bahamas almost a week after Hurricane Dorian made landfall in the Caribbean nation.

Food, water and other supplies are rapidly running out, and residents are waiting desperately to evacuate the devastated Abaco Islands and Grand Bahama. Officials announced late Friday that the death toll had risen to 43, with 35 dead in Abaco and eight in Grand Bahama.

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

On 'Pose,' Janet Mock Tells The Stories She Craved As A Young Trans Person: As a writer, director and producer of the TV series about the underground ballroom community in 1980s New York, she says the work sometimes makes her tear up.

Panel Questions

Sep 7, 2019

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TOM PAPA, HOST:

Right now, panel, time for you to answer some questions about this week's news. Paula?

PAULA POUNDSTONE: Yes.

Who's Bill This Time

Sep 7, 2019

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BILL KURTIS: From NPR and WBEZ Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME, the NPR news quiz. Take a gulp of me, and I'll give you wings. I'm Red Bill.

(CHEERING)

KURTIS: I'm Bill Kurtis. And here is your host at the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago filling in for Peter Segal, Tom Papa.

Predictions

Sep 7, 2019

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TOM PAPA, HOST:

Now, panel, what will be the next altered image in the news? Bim Adewunmi.

BIM ADEWUNMI: The houses of Parliament drawn to show more support for Boris Johnson.

(LAUGHTER)

PAPA: Amy Dickinson.

Lightning Fill In The Blank

Sep 7, 2019

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TOM PAPA, HOST:

Now onto our final game, Lightning Fill In The Blank. Each of our players will have 60 seconds in which to answer as many fill-in-the-blank questions as she can. Each correct answer is worth two points. Bill, can you give us the scores?

Limericks

Sep 7, 2019

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TOM PAPA, HOST:

Panel Questions

Sep 7, 2019

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

BILL KURTIS: From NPR and WBEZ Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME, the NPR news quiz. I'm Bill Kurtis. We're playing this week with Paula Poundstone, Amy Dickinson and Bim Adewunmi And here, again, is your host at the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago, Tom Papa.

(APPLAUSE)

TOM PAPA, HOST:

Bluff The Listener

Sep 7, 2019

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

BILL KURTIS: From NPR and WBEZ Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME, the NPR news quiz. I'm Bill Kurtis. We are playing this week with Bim Adewunmi, Paula Poundstone and Amy Dickinson. And here again is your host at the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago, Tom Papa.

(CHEERING)

TOM PAPA, HOST:

Photographer Kari Wehrs was shocked when she found out four years ago that her 61-year-old mother had started carrying a handgun for self-protection.

Her family never had guns when she was growing up in a midsize Minnesota town. Wehrs' mother said no particular incident had sparked her decision.

There's occasionally a burst of talk about "new adult" as a channel that could exist between the inland lake of young adult fiction and the wide-open ocean of books written for adults. It could be sexier and edgier than young adult but still about teens or early 20-somethings working out their feelings! It's a topic that comes and goes without gaining much traction.

Margaret Atwood has written a sequel to The Handmaid's Tale — that sentence alone will move millions of readers to buy the book ASAP.

The final act of that book, published in 1985, saw its unnamed heroine Offred (at least, that wasn't her real name), step off the pages and into the unknown.

The new book is The Testaments, and it returns us, 15 years later, to the fictional totalitarian theocracy of Gilead, with its Handmaids, Marthas, Wives, Commanders and Aunts.

A Tomato Grows Near Brooklyn

Sep 7, 2019

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Imagine you're on a paddle board in the East River - that's all I'd ever do, imagine it. Near the Brooklyn Bridge, you're admiring that Gershwin tune Manhattan skyline when you spot something red. You paddle closer, closer and suddenly see...

What's On Russian Voters' Minds

Sep 7, 2019

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How nice it is to find time for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

Smoking Hemp Catches On

Sep 7, 2019

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Surviving Dorian In The Bahamas

Sep 7, 2019

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Radio Host Art Bell's Vault Now Online

Sep 7, 2019

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Remember the olden days before the Internet? How did people keep up with news about UFOs, time travelers and the paranormal? Art Bell and the late-night AM radio airwaves.

(SOUNDBITE OF RADIO SHOW, "COAST TO COAST AM")

There's no good way to start a critique of Quichotte, Salman Rushdie's new novel. There are, depending on how you look at such things, either too many ways in or no way in at all.

Is it a book that needs to be examined in the light of its author's existence? Of his own life as a British Indian novelist, his past, his family, his love life, his various (quite real) adventures? Or is it one that demands all that be ignored — to be taken simply for the sum of words inside it, evincing no exterior life at all?

Federal agents were patrolling the Rio Grande in an airboat between Laredo, Texas, and Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, in September 2012. They say a group of men in a park on the Mexican side of the river began throwing rocks at them.

"I just remember the boat. They started to shoot and they hit him in the heart, and he fell to the ground," says Priscila Arévalo, the daughter of one of the Mexican men. "We ran away. When we came back, my papa he was already dead."

The parent agency of the National Weather Service said late Friday that President Trump was correct when he claimed earlier this week that Hurricane Dorian had threatened the state of Alabama.

The surprise announcement in an unsigned statement by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration essentially endorsed Trump's Sunday tweet saying that Alabama will "most likely be hit (much) harder than anticipated."

India's attempt to become the first country to land a robotic mission at the Moon's south pole has failed, after engineers lost contact with the Vikram lander — part of the Chandrayaan-2 probe.

Scientists at the Indian Space Research Organisation lost signal from the lander as it hovered over the surface, moments away from what would have been a successful soft-landing.

"Fake news" is a phrase that may seem specific to our particular moment and time in American history.

But Columbia University Professor Andie Tucher says fake news is deeply rooted in American journalism.

In 1690, British officials forced the first newspaper in North America to shut down after it fabricated information. Nineteenth-century newspapers often didn't agree on basic facts. In covering a lurid murder in 1836, two major papers in New York City offered wildly differing perspectives on the case.

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Before you fully hand yourself over to fall, know there are ways to hold on to that summer fun, so says our poetry reviewer Tess Taylor. She has brought us some poems from this year that convey summer.

Hello, Tess.

TESS TAYLOR, BYLINE: Hi, Mary Louise.

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