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DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

This is FRESH AIR. I'm David Bianculli, editor of the website TV Worth Watching, sitting in for Terry Gross.

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DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

Pressure builds for lawmakers in Mississippi to change the state flag, the only one in the country to feature a Confederate emblem.

Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd gets the latest from Kayleigh Skinner, deputy managing editor for Mississippi Today.

Colorado Gov. Jared Polis has directed state officials to investigate and possibly prosecute the police killing of 23-year-old Elijah McClain.

How Healthy Are The Banks?

Jun 26, 2020

The Federal Reserve is forcing banks to suspend stock buybacks and cap dividend payments for the third quarter of this year to ensure banks have enough liquidity if unemployment were to reach 19.5% in a worst-case scenario.

We talk to Mike Regan, senior editor at Bloomberg News, about sources of stress for the banks.

This article was originally published on WBUR.org.

June is Pride month — a time for LGBTQ people all over the world to celebrate the freedom to be themselves. But what if being yourself also means you have to give up the thing you love most?

Keya Roy with Radioactive Youth Media at KUOW in Seattle has the story of one young dancer’s journey through the gendered world of Bollywood.

 

This article was originally published on WBUR.org.

As it struggles to control a rising number of new cases of the coronavirus, Florida took a dramatic step, suspending the consumption of alcohol on the premises at bars statewide. Officials in Texas took a similar step Friday, requiring bars to close at noon and be available only for takeout and delivery. The order in Florida came as the state recorded another spike Friday.

Updated at 1:59 p.m.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott is ordering bars to close again and restaurants to reduce seating capacity amid a surge in new coronavirus cases. It's the most significant rollback since the state began reopening.

In an executive order, Abbott restricted bars to delivery and takeout service only starting at noon Friday.

The New York police officer accused of using a chokehold in an incident captured on video Sunday has been charged with strangulation.

The officer, 39-year-old David Afanador, was suspended the same day the cellphone video appeared to show him choking a Black man on a Queens boardwalk. Now he's been arrested and charged with felony strangulation and attempted strangulation. Afanador pleaded not guilty and was released Thursday afternoon without bail.

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode TED Radio Wow-er

There may be hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of undiscovered ancient sites. Sarah Parcak wants to locate them — from space.

About Sarah Parcak

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode TED Radio Wow-er

We know that dolphins make distinctive clicks and whistles, but is that a language? Researcher Denise Herzing thinks it might be, and for the past 35 years she's been working to unlock it.

About Denise Herzing

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In the 1970s and '80s, a string of violent, terrifying crimes went unsolved around California. The perpetrators got nicknames: The Visalia Ransacker. The East Area Rapist. The Original Night Stalker.

And then in 2013, true-crime writer Michelle McNamara connected the dots in a remarkable article for Los Angeles Magazine. She suspected they were all the same person, and she gave him a name of her own: the Golden State Killer.

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Change is coming to a company known for a very particular brand of cuteness.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED SINGER: (Singing) Hello Kitty, (singing in Japanese).

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

What does it take to reopen an investigation into a police-involved death of a young Black man after the district attorney refuses to press criminal charges and the officers have been cleared of any wrongdoing?

Updated at 11:09 p.m. ET

Illinois moves into the next phase of its reopening plan on Friday.

The guidelines allow movie theaters, zoos, museums and health and fitness centers to reopen with limited capacity. Restaurants will be able to offer in-door dining and gatherings of 50 people or fewer will be permitted.

Schools and child care programs with social distancing policies in place can also reopen. Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker said hundreds of thousands of Illinoisans can return to work.

NASA's Washington, D.C., headquarters will soon bear the name of Mary Jackson, the agency's first African American female engineer and a driving force behind getting U.S. astronauts into space.

NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine announced the move in a statement released Wednesday.

"Mary never accepted the status quo, she helped break barriers and open opportunities for African Americans and women in the field of engineering and technology," he said.

House Democrats made good on their plans to respond to a national outcry for reform of the nation's law enforcement departments, with the chamber approving wide-ranging efforts to overhaul the way police do their jobs.

Splash Mountain, a Disney Theme Park staple ride, is undergoing a design change in response to complaints about its association with the film Song of the South. Disney announced in a statement on Thursday that the ride would be "re-themed" to focus on the 2009 animated film The Princess and the Frog.

The state of Georgia is juggling three crises: a rising number of COVID-19 cases, problems with voting access as the general election approaches, and the killings of two Black men,

Updated at 8:44 p.m. ET Thursday

Attorney General William Barr said Thursday that he doesn't believe President Trump has overstepped the boundaries between the White House and the Justice Department in a number of big recent cases.

Barr told NPR in a wide-ranging interview that he believes Trump has "supervisory authority" to oversee the effective course of justice — but Barr said that ultimately, the choices were made and carried through independently by the Justice Department.

A massive cloud of dust from the Sahara Desert is arriving along the U.S. Gulf Coast this week after traveling across the Atlantic Ocean. The phenomenon happens every year – but the 2020 version is especially large and imposing, experts said.

The dust cloud is "quite large" this year, said Marshall Shepherd, director of the Atmospheric Sciences Program at the University of Georgia, in an interview on NPR's All Things Considered. "I think that's why it's garnering so much attention."

America's reckoning on race has come to TV animation, as stars Jenny Slate and Kristen Bell, who are white, have agreed to stop voicing characters who are biracial.

And while some fans may be disappointed to see their favorite performers leaving TV shows they enjoy, the moves also end a subtle way in which actors of color have been marginalized. It's an attention-getting moment when performers have recognized their white privilege and moved to end it.

In an interview with Morning Edition's Steve Inskeep, Attorney General William Barr denied that the Justice Department is continually upholding the interest of the president, dismissed concerns about the firing of federal prosecutor Geoffrey Berman and said he does not believe an election conducted mainly by mail can be secure.

Steve Inskeep: Thank you again for taking the time. I'm appreciative to have this opportunity.

Attorney General William Barr: Thank you.

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SARAH MCCAMMON, HOST:

The police department in Wilmington, N.C. has fired three police officers after investigators say footage from one of their patrol cars showed them exchanging racist and sometimes threatening remarks.

Those include one of the officers saying he was ready for a "civil war" against Black people.

On Tuesday, the Wilmington Police Department fired officers James Gilmore and Kevin Piner and Corporal Jesse Moore after a routine review of video by the department triggered an investigation.

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