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In Yemen, 50,000 people are already starving. Sixteen million could go hungry this year. Those were the grim facts presented today at a U.N. donor conference. Yemen has been devastated by a war that began in 2014 - fighting between the rebel Houthi government and pro-government forces led by Saudi Arabia. Now President Biden says U.S. support for the Saudi-led offensive will end. And Secretary of State Tony Blinken has promised an additional $191 million in humanitarian aid.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

In Yemen, 50,000 people are already starving. Sixteen million could go hungry this year. Those were the grim facts presented today at a U.N. donor conference. Yemen has been devastated by a war that began in 2014 - fighting between the rebel Houthi government and pro-government forces led by Saudi Arabia. Now President Biden says U.S. support for the Saudi-led offensive will end. And Secretary of State Tony Blinken has promised an additional $191 million in humanitarian aid.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

And I am in the suburbs of Washington. I'm just turning. I'm just about to turn up this steep asphalt hill. This looks like your typical suburban office park, but just around the corner, we're about to hit a security check. That is because this is the headquarters of U.S. intelligence. And we are here to interview the woman in charge. That would be Avril Haines. Having worked over the years at the State Department, the White House, the No. 2 job at the CIA, she took over in January as the director of national intelligence.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

And I am in the suburbs of Washington. I'm just turning. I'm just about to turn up this steep asphalt hill. This looks like your typical suburban office park, but just around the corner, we're about to hit a security check. That is because this is the headquarters of U.S. intelligence. And we are here to interview the woman in charge. That would be Avril Haines. Having worked over the years at the State Department, the White House, the No. 2 job at the CIA, she took over in January as the director of national intelligence.

In a note to newsroom staff Chief Washington Editor Shirley Henry and Supervising Political Editor Arnie Seipel announced this staffing update:

Hi all — We wanted to share some updates from the Washington Desk as we refocus our political coverage in the wake of the election and its fallout.

New York's attorney general is proceeding with an investigation into the allegations of sexual harassment made against Gov. Andrew Cuomo. The governor's office authorized the probe, clearing the way for the hiring of an independent law firm to conduct the inquiry.

JERUSALEM - Israel's Supreme Court on Monday ordered an end to a controversial surveillance program to track COVID-19 infections through cellular phone location data, citing concerns about the country spying on its own citizens.

JERUSALEM - Israeli health officials have urged their country's leaders to help vaccinate the entire Palestinian population against COVID-19, citing a public health imperative, an outgoing senior health official told NPR Monday.

For nearly three decades, the card game Magic: The Gathering has offered a popular escape for the young and young at heart.

Players acting as powerful wizards called Planeswalkers battle it out by drawing powerful spells and creatures to beat the opponent. From its inception, most of those Planeswalkers have been white characters — until now.

Magic: The Gathering is exploring Black life through a set of new cards called Black Is Magic.

At the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in northern New Hampshire, scientists are finding ways to adapt to the pandemic, which has halted groundbreaking field research.

Researchers have adapted to remotely record the sounds of the forest to track how warmer weather is affecting the behavior of migratory birds, Annie Ropeik of New Hampshire Public Radio reports.

The 10-year Treasury yield is dipping again after rising to the highest level in a year last week of 1.6%.

The Treasury yield serves as a benchmark for the economy, and gains in the yield could signal the economy is doing better. But some economists are concerned it could mean higher inflation is on the horizon.

The Atlantic’s Zeynep Tufekci joins Here & Now‘s Tonya Mosley to discuss how top-down, imprecise messaging from public health officials about how to stay safe during the pandemic has caused confusion and made it harder to fight the coronavirus.

After suspending the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine rollout in South Africa, last week Ghana became the first African country to receive a shipment of COVID-19 vaccine doses through the COVAX vaccine-sharing initiative.

Here & Now‘s Callum Borchers talks with NPR’s Eyder Peralta about the country’s response to the pandemic and vaccine rollout strategy.

This article was originally published on WBUR.org.

The sleight-of-hand master explores themes of identity, honesty and the emotional cost of keeping secrets in the memoir, AMORALMAN. DelGaudio's one-man show In & Of Itself is now available on Hulu.

Myanmar's detained former leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, appeared for a court hearing Monday, a month after being ousted in a coup. Her supporters again staged protests calling for her release, despite a deadly crackdown by police.

More than 6 million U.S. homes are at significant risk from wildfires. For the most part, it’s up to residents to do the work to protect their homes. But getting your neighbor to cut down beloved trees isn’t always easy.

Colorado Public Radio’s Michael Elizabeth Sakas has this story on how some communities in that state are trying to be safer.

Texas is still in recovery mode two weeks after extreme icy weather led millions in the state to be without power, heat and in many cases, water for days.

The true number of those who died because of hypothermia or carbon monoxide poisoning could take more time to tally, but already the numbers appear to rival the dozens of deaths from Hurricane Harvey in 2017.

Here & Now discusses the latest news about New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s sexual harassment allegations and what an independent investigation could mean.

NPR’s Sally Herships joins us.

The House passed President Biden’s nearly $2 trillion coronavirus aid package on Saturday by a narrow margin that included no Republicans. Democrats were forced to drop a proposal to increase the minimum wage to $15.

Host Callum Borchers gets the latest from NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis.

There are scads of talented spy novelists, but the ones who matter capture something essential about their historical moment. Back in the 1930s and '40s, Eric Ambler nailed the sense of ordinary people being caught up in the machinations of great totalitarian powers. A few decades later, John le Carré caught the personal and moral ambiguities of what John F. Kennedy dubbed the "long twilight struggle" of the Cold War.

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton is suing Griddy, saying the electricity provider passed along massive increases during winter storms, leaving some customers to face up to $5,000 in power bills. Paxton's lawsuit says Griddy deceived customers when it promised low "wholesale" energy prices.

The state says it received more than 400 complaints about Griddy in less than two weeks.

When Marvin Gaye’s record “What’s Going On” came out in 1971, unemployment was at a high of 6%, people were protesting police brutality, and Americans were angry over the Vietnam War.

“What’s Going On” reflected those times with laser-sharp precision, and it’s gone on to become Motown’s biggest commercial success. And 50 years later, the themes of the album still reflect some of the most significant challenges and divisions we face as a society.

A third COVID-19 vaccine is on its way to health clinics on Monday after the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention approved Johnson & Johnson’s application for emergency use over the weekend.

Here & Now‘s Tonya Mosley speaks with Dr. Amesh Adalja, a senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins University Center for Health Security.

Catalan police raided the FC Barcelona stadium on Monday, and there are reports that the club's former president and three others have been arrested.

The police said several searches and seizures were carried out by its financial crimes unit, but did not give additional details.

In a note to the Programming staff Senior Director of Programming Steve Nelson announced the following staffing update:

All,

I'm thrilled to welcome Lauren González to NPR as our new Senior Manager, Story Lab. Lauren will manage new pitches for podcasts and other content, and work closely with the programming leadership team to develop them.

Tiger Woods is under medical care for a terrible car accident – but golf audiences saw his image at tournaments around the U.S. on Sunday, as many of the game's top golfers wore Woods' signature red shirt and black pants in his honor.

"It is hard to explain how touching today was when I turned on the tv and saw all the red shirts," Woods said via Twitter. "To every golfer and every fan, you are truly helping me get through this tough time."

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Updated at 10:55 a.m. ET

Former French President Nicolas Sarkozy was found guilty on Monday by a court in Paris on charges of trying to bribe a judge and influence peddling dating from his time in office. He received a three-year prison sentence with two of the years suspended.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

The largest power cooperative in Texas filed for bankruptcy protection Monday, citing a massive bill from the state's electricity grid operator following last month's winter storm that left millions of residents without power for days.

Brazos Electric Power Cooperative filed for Chapter 11 in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of Texas, according to court documents reviewed by NPR.

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