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Unnecessary PSAs With Bill Kurtis

Jun 27, 2020

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

BILL KURTIS: From NPR and WBEZ Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME, the NPR news quiz. I'm Bill Kurtis. We're playing this week with Faith Salie, Mo Rocca and Hari Kondabolu. And here again is your host, a man who won't cut his fingernails until there's a vaccine...

Bluff The Listener

Jun 27, 2020

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

Panel Questions

Jun 27, 2020

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Right now, panel, it is time for you to answer some questions about this week's news. Mo, Hollywood is finally allowing filming to resume this week, but there are new rules. Among them, actors are being instructed to do what as little as possible while filming?

Rowing crew got Arshay Cooper away from the gang life on Chicago's West Side in the 1990s.

In A Most Beautiful Thing: The True Story of America's First All-Black High School Rowing Team, he tells the story of how he, and others from rival neighborhoods, found their way to crew — and each other.

Now, Cooper is an accomplished chef in New York — and he works to convince other kids to find an outlet in crew. His forthcoming book has been turned into a documentary narrated by Common.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Cue the music.

(SOUNDBITE OF BACH'S "TOCCATA AND FUGUE IN D MINOR")

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Kabul's grave diggers have long been witness to Afghanistan's bloodshed. Now they're given a glimpse of how the pandemic is battering the Afghan capital, as NPR's Diaa Hadid reports.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

And now it's time for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Eric Andre joins us now. His first comedy special, "Legalize Everything," is now on Netflix. And, Mr. Andre, I don't think you have to worry about us giving away some of your best lines because I don't think I can repeat them.

Kazu, the narrator of Tokyo Ueno Station, had hoped that his death would bring him some rest, some sense of closure. The man led a life marked with hard work and intense pain; he spent his final years homeless, living in a makeshift shelter in a Tokyo park. But when he dies, he finds the afterlife — such as it is — is nothing like he expected.

A little under a year ago, Eso Won Books, a Black-owned bookstore in Los Angeles, hosted Ibram X. Kendi for a signing. Eso Won sold about 40 copies of Kendi's newest book, How to Be an Antiracist, that night. In the months after, they sold very few.

But in these past few weeks? They've sold 500 copies — and counting.

Updated at 5:10 a.m. ET Saturday

Milton Glaser, the graphic designer behind the iconic "I ♥ NY" logo, has died at 91.

Glaser's poster of Bob Dylan with psychedelic hair adorned the walls of Dylan's fans all over America. The co-founder of New York magazine died of natural causes on his birthday, according to the magazine's obituary.

Citing the unrelenting spread of the coronavirus, a federal judge has ordered that all children currently held in U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement custody for more than 20 days must be released by July 17.

U.S. District Judge Dolly Gee of California issued the scathing order Friday afternoon, saying the Trump administration had failed to provide even the most basic health protections for children and their families amid the pandemic.

She described the ICE-operated facilities as being "on fire," adding that "there is no more time for half measures."

The Minneapolis City Council on Friday unanimously approved a proposal to eliminate the city's police department, marking the first step toward establishing a new "holistic" approach to public safety.

The move follows more than a month of national outrage and protests against police brutality in the wake of the killing of George Floyd, a Black man who died after an officer pressed his knee into his neck for more than eight minutes.

Each week, we answer "frequently asked questions" about life during the coronavirus crisis. If you have a question you'd like us to consider for a future post, email us at goatsandsoda@npr.org with the subject line: "Weekly Coronavirus Questions."

Mohammed Monsuri is an incarcerated student and musician who is serving a 25-year sentence at Sing Sing Correctional Facility in Ossining, N.Y. In this essay, dictated to journalist Daniel A.

A federal fisheries management agency has barred some of its employees from making formal references to the COVID-19 pandemic without preapproval from leadership, according to an internal agency document.

Planned Parenthood has named interim President and CEO Alexis McGill Johnson as its new permanent leader in a bid to bring stability to the health care provider that has come under repeated attacks by conservative groups.

McGill Johnson will continue to lead both Planned Parenthood Federation of America and the organization's advocacy arm, the Planned Parenthood Action Fund.

Sitting outside a pharmaceutical warehouse in central New Jersey, Reynalda Cruz counted dozens of workers arriving in vans for the early morning shift.

Workers spilled out of packed vehicles that rolled up to the facility, one after the other. Cruz, a labor organizer, counted 16 people in a van built to hold 15 — despite recommendations that everyone stay six feet apart to stop the spread of COVID-19.

"Oh my God, there's more," Cruz, 47, exclaimed in Spanish. "It's like they're not in a pandemic."

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

SARAH MCCAMMON, HOST:

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Updated at 5:20 p.m. ET

Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp on Friday signed a hate crimes bill into law.

The killing of Ahmaud Arbery, a 25-year-old Black man shot dead while jogging in February, drew nationwide attention and energized efforts to pass this law.

Ahead of the signing on Friday, Kemp called House Bill 426 a "silver lining" amid difficult and stormy times.

Ophira's Meditations

Jun 26, 2020

Ophira takes Jane Levy and Alex Newell on a journey into the world of meditation as she quizzes them about coping mechanisms.

Heard on: Jane Levy and Alex Newell: Zoey's Extraordinary Zoom Call.

Character Reference

Jun 26, 2020

Actors Jane Levy and Alex Newell, from NBC's Zoey's Extraordinary Playlist, try to guess well-known characters based on how they're described in books.

Heard on: Jane Levy and Alex Newell: Zoey's Extraordinary Zoom Call.

Black Playwrights

Jun 26, 2020

Inspired by his love of theatre and per his request, actor and comedian Baron Vaughn is challenged to a game about Black playwrights.

Heard on: Jane Levy and Alex Newell: Zoey's Extraordinary Zoom Call.

Baron Vaughn

Jun 26, 2020

Baron Vaughn has had success as both an actor and a comedian. After graduating from Boston University's theater program, he appeared in a variety of television series and movies, ultimately landing the role of Nwabudike "Bud" Bergstein in Netflix's Grace and Frankie.

You're A Good Jokerman, Charlie Brown

Jun 26, 2020

Catherine Reitman and Philip Sternberg join house musician Jonathan Coulton for a game that tests their knowledge of two famous Minnesotans: Bob Dylan and Charles Schulz.

Heard on: Jane Levy and Alex Newell: Zoey's Extraordinary Zoom Call.

State Your Message

Jun 26, 2020

Catherine Reitman and Philip Sternberg of Workin' Moms face off in a game where they create words out of postal abbreviations.

Heard on: Jane Levy and Alex Newell: Zoey's Extraordinary Zoom Call.

Spectators are welcome to attend the Indianapolis 500 in August, track officials said Friday, but the enormous venue will be limited to 50% of its normal capacity because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Indianapolis Motor Speedway usually accommodates hundreds of thousands of people for the landmark race.

"We're committed to running the Indy 500 on Sunday, Aug. 23, and will welcome fans to the world's greatest racing venue," said President J. Douglas Boles, president of Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

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