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Two trend lines have moved in opposite directions over the last four years. One is the number of refugees worldwide. It has been soaring - 26.3 million as of mid-2020. The other is the number of refugees resettled in the U.S. It has plummeted from 85,000 a year at the start of the Trump administration to about 12,000 last year. President Biden wants to reverse that second trend. And here to talk about what that means is the U.N. Refugee Agency's deputy high commissioner, Kelly Clements.

Hi there.

KELLY CLEMENTS: Hi, Ari.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Two trend lines have moved in opposite directions over the last four years. One is the number of refugees worldwide. It has been soaring - 26.3 million as of mid-2020. The other is the number of refugees resettled in the U.S. It has plummeted from 85,000 a year at the start of the Trump administration to about 12,000 last year. President Biden wants to reverse that second trend. And here to talk about what that means is the U.N. Refugee Agency's deputy high commissioner, Kelly Clements.

Hi there.

KELLY CLEMENTS: Hi, Ari.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Two trend lines have moved in opposite directions over the last four years. One is the number of refugees worldwide. It has been soaring - 26.3 million as of mid-2020. The other is the number of refugees resettled in the U.S. It has plummeted from 85,000 a year at the start of the Trump administration to about 12,000 last year. President Biden wants to reverse that second trend. And here to talk about what that means is the U.N. Refugee Agency's deputy high commissioner, Kelly Clements.

Hi there.

KELLY CLEMENTS: Hi, Ari.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Two trend lines have moved in opposite directions over the last four years. One is the number of refugees worldwide. It has been soaring - 26.3 million as of mid-2020. The other is the number of refugees resettled in the U.S. It has plummeted from 85,000 a year at the start of the Trump administration to about 12,000 last year. President Biden wants to reverse that second trend. And here to talk about what that means is the U.N. Refugee Agency's deputy high commissioner, Kelly Clements.

Hi there.

KELLY CLEMENTS: Hi, Ari.

A choral group in Dallas hopes to use blockchain to monetize their new recording. Instead of making pennies from streams, they can sell a single copy for thousands of dollars... if they find a bidder.

To help people connect with those they've lost touch with during the pandemic, Canada Post, the primary postal operator in the country, has sent every household a postage-paid postcard for free.

The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday made it more difficult for undocumented immigrants who have lived in the U.S. for a long time to fight deportation. The court's 5-to-3 ruling came in the case of a man who had lived in the U.S. for 25 years but who had used a fake Social Security card to get a job as a janitor.

Movie theaters in Chicago, Houston, Phoenix and Philadelphia have been open for months. But attendance remains low, not just because of public safety concerns—but because there isn't much to see. Major studios are delaying their blockbusters, or releasing them straight to streaming.

One big reason? The two biggest movie markets in the country, New York City and Los Angeles, remain closed.

U.S. Capitol Police are ramping up security at the complex on Thursday over concerns about a possible plot by a militia group to breach the building.

Electric Reliability Council of Texas CEO Bill Magness has been fired from his post after February’s deadly blackouts that left more than 4 million people without power.

Here & Now‘s Tonya Mosley talks with Michael Regan, senior editor at Bloomberg News, about the termination and replacing Magness.

You may not have heard much about the Southeast Alaska fishing town of Pelican over the past year, or the Indigenous Aleutian Island village of Atka.

Those places have stayed out of the news because they’re some of the few Alaska communities that have made it through the whole pandemic so far without a single confirmed case of COVID-19.

And as Nat Herz with Alaska Public Media reports, some of those communities have vaccinated enough people to be close to reaching herd immunity.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Large numbers of police and National Guard were at the U.S. Capitol today to protect against a threat that never materialized. March 4 is a day that holds significance for some conspiracy theorists, and officials had been saying that they'd received reports of a plot by a militia group to attempt to breach the Capitol. Even though that hasn't happened, Capitol Police are asking the National Guard to remain on site for two more months. NPR's Sarah McCammon has been monitoring the situation and she's with us now.

Hi, Sarah.

For the full article and book excerpt, click here.

Past presidents have delivered some famous speeches on March 4, which used to be Inauguration Day. During the Great Depression in 1933, President Franklin D. Roosevelt took office saying “the only thing we have to fear is fear itself.”

Many of us have been reflecting on where we were this time last year when some realized they would be required to work from home in order to stay safe and curb the spread of COVID-19.

Here & Now hosts Tonya Mosley and Callum Borchers share their memories.

What memories do you have of when you had to go home last March? Tell us by sending us an email to letters@hereandnow.org.

This article was originally published on WBUR.org.

A persistent question about COVID-19 that remains unanswered a year into this pandemic: Why do so many people die in some countries — but not in others?

More than 515,000 people have now died from COVID-19 in the U.S., but in India, the recorded deaths have been less than one-third of that, even though the population is about four times as large.

Similarly, South Africa has been hit hard, but in Nigeria and Côte d’Ivoire, the deaths have been far lower than expected.

LULIANG, China — The meteoric rise of aluminum executive Zhang Zhixiong transformed his rural Chinese hamlet into a lucrative mining community. But his fall from grace was even more dramatic.

In March 2018, he and 10 others were sentenced to harsh prison terms for supposedly forming a criminal organization and illegal mining, among other crimes. Zhang, chairman of Juxin Mining Co., was accused of being a crime boss and received a 25-year prison sentence. He denies the charges.

The U.S. oil boom created a lot of oil. But it destroyed a lot of money — investors poured cash into oil companies and got nothing to show for it.

So now, as the industry tries to recover from the pandemic and address concerns about climate change, investors are clamoring to see more cash, which means — counterintuitively — pumping less oil.

Camila Domonoske, who covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR’s business desk, has the story.

Host Callum Borchers speaks with wildlife photographer Will Burrard-Lucas about his new book, “The Black Leopard: My Quest to Photograph One of Africa’s Most Elusive Big Cats.”

The book features pictures from his photographic expedition to Kenya in 2019.

All images courtesy of The Black Leopard: My Quest to Photograph One of Africa’s Most Elusive Big Cats, © Will Burrard-Lucas, published by Chronicle Books 2021.

Former members of the Trump administration are speaking out about a decision to quietly divert $10 billion earmarked for hospitals during the coronavirus pandemic.

The money was meant to help health care providers pay for things like staffing and personal protective equipment. Instead, it was allocated to Operation Warp Speed contracts to aid with vaccines.

As President Biden pushes to get U.S. schools fully open soon, an art exhibit aims to help people visualize what it means that they're closed.

The reason it's so hard to kill a mosquito is that they move really well.

Scientists are trying to build a robot with that kind of agility. And these tiny but mighty flying robots could be used in life-and-death situations, such as finding people in a collapsed building.

Kevin Chen says he spends "a lot of time looking at the flapping-wing physics, that is understanding how an insect can flap their wings and generate lift and drag forces."

With smoke-and-mirrors panache, The Committed -- Viet Thanh Nguyen's sequel to The Sympathizer -- continues the travails of our Eurasian Ulysses, now relocated to France and self-identified as Vo Danh (which literally means "Nameless"). Having survived a communist reeducation camp, a perilous sea crossing, and a long sojourn in an Indonesian refugee center, he arrives in Paris on July 18, 1981 — the birthday of Nelson Mandela — to become, once again, a refugee.

Home is Not a Country was absolutely a book I read for the title. It spoke to me as a third culture kid who has lived around the world, in constant search of what home could mean and how I could create it for myself. But it also felt like a love letter to anyone who has ever been an outsider, or searched to understand their history, no matter where they come from.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Berta Romero, is a counselor at Mary Harris Mother Jones elementary school in Prince George's County, a suburb of Washington, D.C. It's a position that was created before the pandemic, to help undocumented children adjust to school.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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