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NPR senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro (@DomencoNPR) joins Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson to preview the 10th Democratic presidential candidates’ debate Tuesday night.

This article was originally published on WBUR.org.

The relationship between President Trump and Attorney General William Barr has been the subject of intense scrutiny in the last few weeks.

Barr came under fire after he intervened to change DOJ prosecutors’ sentencing recommendation for Trump associate Roger Stone. His intervention came just hours after Trump tweeted about the sentencing, calling it “horrible and very unfair.”

Deep in the third quarter against Stanford, Oregon guard Sabrina Ionescu picked up a defensive rebound.

It was a big one: With that play, Ionescu became the first NCAA basketball player, male or female, to reach the milestone of 2,000 points, 1,000 rebounds and 1,000 assists in a career.

The Legacy Of Ida B. Wells

20 hours ago

In celebration of Black History Month, we honor trailblazer Ida B. Wells. She was a dogged investigative reporter and publisher who stood up against racism and violence toward black Americans.

David Freudberg, executive producer of Human Media, reports.

This article was originally published on WBUR.org.

The era of tech optimism may well be over.

A new Pew Research report finds about half of tech experts predict technology will weaken democracy over the next decade. The public relations firm Edelman also found a sharp decline in public trust in technology in its annual “Trust Barometer” report.

China has been detaining and surveilling its Uighur Muslim minority. Host Jeremy Hobson talks to Harvard professor Bill Kirby about the long-standing human rights crisis in the country.

 

This article was originally published on WBUR.org.

We talk to New York Times reporter Sui-Lee Wee (@suilee) about why thousands of health care workers in China, many of them young and otherwise healthy, seem to be bearing the brunt of the new coronavirus.

Here & Now wants to know what questions our listeners have about COVID-19, or the new coronavirus. Ask us here.

Seven Democratic presidential candidates gather Tuesday for another debate in Charleston, South Carolina. The knives are out for frontrunner Bernie Sanders, who’s come under fire for his far-left policies and measured praise for Fidel Castro’s regime in Cuba.

Tom Steyer also returns to the stage after missing qualification for the Nevada debate. He’s vying with former Vice President Joe Biden for a majority of the black American vote.

To say there is a lot of hype around 5G is probably an understatement. Verizon and T-Mobile spent an estimated $22 million on Super Bowl ads to tell us all about it.

In one commercial, Verizon said it would allow firefighters to see through smoke and doctors to communicate with ambulances in real time. Actor Anthony Anderson touted the supremacy of T-Mobile's 5G network to his mother, who ground-truths the matter by going from the pie shop to the park to ultimately the club.

Updated at 6:00 p.m. ET

The union representing opera performers, choral singers and dancers says that according to an independent investigation it commissioned, opera megastar Plácido Domingo engaged in "inappropriate activity" with women both "in and outside of the workplace."

In a note to newsroom staff, Edith Chapin, Executive Editor of NPR News, announced this staffing update:

Hi all:

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Here in Los Angeles yesterday, fans, friends and family of the late basketball star Kobe Bryant paid their respects at the Staples Center. NPR's Mandalit del Barco was at the memorial, and she filed this report.

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Good morning. I'm Noel King. Eighty-six-year old Mary Ann Wakefield stepped onto the court during a break in an Ole Miss basketball game in Mississippi. It was one of those gimmicks where she'd get a prize if she could sink a long golf putt.

Updated at 11:40 a.m. ET

A well-known Hong Kong bookseller who published critical and sometimes titillating volumes about Chinese leaders and who disappeared in China more than two years ago has been quietly sentenced to a decade in prison for passing on intelligence to people overseas.

Updated at 8:45 a.m. ET

Former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, who was ousted from power in the early days of the Arab Spring, has died at the age of 91.

Egypt's government has announced three days of public mourning for Mubarak, who is to be buried in a military funeral.

A statement from the Egyptian presidency said it "mourns with great sorrow" Mubarak's death in light of his role as a hero of the 1973 Arab-Israeli War, which it said "restored dignity and pride" among Arab nations.

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Say Amen, Somebody, a documentary about the men and women who pioneered African American gospel music, was widely praised upon its release in 1982; the late Roger Ebert called it "One of the most joyful movies I've ever seen." But it hasn't been seen in theaters in nearly 30 years. Now George T. Nierenberg's film has been restored and re-released to theaters and DVD.

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A well-known publisher of political texts in China has been sentenced to 10 years in prison for illegally passing intelligence to unspecified people overseas. It's a complicated story, and NPR's Emily Feng brought it to us.

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In 2009, Mark Zuckerberg had a question for Facebook: "What do we want to be when we grow up?"

While the social network was still several years away from going public, it was evolving beyond the startup phase. It had turned down a $1 billion offer to sell itself to Yahoo. It was competing for talented engineers with bigger Silicon Valley neighbors like Google. Facebook needed to define itself.

Employees quickly zeroed in on where to find their answer: Zuckerberg, the founder and CEO.

The Nevada Democratic Party's top official said on Monday that the state's presidential caucuses this month should perhaps be the last. He says the state should begin the process of shifting to a statewide presidential primary.

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Major League Baseball's opening day is a little more than a month off. But one of the boys of summer has been cross-training in the off season — by roping cattle. Professionally. Under an alias.

Madison Bumgarner, the left-handed pitching ace who was 2014 World Series MVP with the San Francisco Giants, has been entering — and sometimes winning — rodeo events under the name Mason Saunders.

Craigslist is a bit of an anomaly on the rapidly changing Internet. While other sites are constantly tweaking, testing new designs, finding new ways to gather data, Craigslist is remarkable for its stability.

A typical city's page looks roughly the same today as it did 15 years ago.

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