For many businesses, the coronavirus pandemic has created a coin shortage. All the sheltering at home put a crimp in the normal circulation of pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters, and now some retailers are asking customers to pay with exact change.

Undaunted by the coronavirus pandemic, voters in Puerto Rico donned face masks on Sunday and headed out to local polling places to cast votes in a closely watched gubernatorial primary election.

There was just one problem: For many voters, there weren't any ballots.

By early afternoon on the day of the primary, only a handful of polling places had received their paper ballots, NPR's Joel Rose reported Sunday.

Voters and politicians alike were infuriated, Rose said. One candidate called the situation "embarrassing."

Contact tracing has been one of the key tools in the fight against the coronavirus. Now, as the virus has infected more than 5 million Americans, the U.S. has at least 41,122 contact tracers — but that's not even half what public health experts said would be needed to help contain the spread.

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For nearly five months, nursing homes, assisted living facilities and the people who live in them have been on lockdown. Many states, including Florida, have not allowed in-person visits since March. The policy was imposed to shield a very vulnerable population from COVID-19. But as NPR's Greg Allen reports, families, health care workers and elected officials say the isolation is taking a toll on the people it's designed to protect.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

For nearly five months, nursing homes, assisted living facilities and the people who live in them have been on lockdown. Many states, including Florida, have not allowed in-person visits since March. The policy was imposed to shield a very vulnerable population from COVID-19. But as NPR's Greg Allen reports, families, health care workers and elected officials say the isolation is taking a toll on the people it's designed to protect.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

For nearly five months, nursing homes, assisted living facilities and the people who live in them have been on lockdown. Many states, including Florida, have not allowed in-person visits since March. The policy was imposed to shield a very vulnerable population from COVID-19. But as NPR's Greg Allen reports, families, health care workers and elected officials say the isolation is taking a toll on the people it's designed to protect.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

For nearly five months, nursing homes, assisted living facilities and the people who live in them have been on lockdown. Many states, including Florida, have not allowed in-person visits since March. The policy was imposed to shield a very vulnerable population from COVID-19. But as NPR's Greg Allen reports, families, health care workers and elected officials say the isolation is taking a toll on the people it's designed to protect.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

For nearly five months, nursing homes, assisted living facilities and the people who live in them have been on lockdown. Many states, including Florida, have not allowed in-person visits since March. The policy was imposed to shield a very vulnerable population from COVID-19. But as NPR's Greg Allen reports, families, health care workers and elected officials say the isolation is taking a toll on the people it's designed to protect.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

For nearly five months, nursing homes, assisted living facilities and the people who live in them have been on lockdown. Many states, including Florida, have not allowed in-person visits since March. The policy was imposed to shield a very vulnerable population from COVID-19. But as NPR's Greg Allen reports, families, health care workers and elected officials say the isolation is taking a toll on the people it's designed to protect.

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