Our Daily Breather is a series where we ask writers and artists to recommend one thing that's helping them get through the days of isolation during the coronavirus pandemic.

Who: Channy Leaneagh

Where: Minneapolis, Minn.

Recommendation: Doing the next right thing

Usually, when I arrive home in Hanoi, I'm out the same day riding my scooter around the treacherous traffic of the Vietnamese capital, past the little cafes and food vendors on the sidewalk. The thrill of making it, sometimes narrowly, through a chaotic sea of pedestrians, scooters and cars is oddly liberating.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

I woke up to birdsong this morning. That might seem idyllic, but it is odd. Flocks of sparrows regularly fight over snack debris near the bodega on my corner in Ridgewood, Queens, but I usually wake up to car horns or chatter on the street outside my window.

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is preparing to declare modern Japan's first-ever state of emergency in response to a sudden increase in novel coronavirus cases in the capital, Tokyo, and several of the country's other major cities.

The streaming service Quibi — short for "quick bites" — calls itself "the first entertainment platform designed specifically for your phone."

Translation: They're doling out their shows in 7-to-10 minute chunks — er, episodes — at a rate of one per day. Quick bites, get it? Perfect for the busy, distracted, on-the-go consumer! Too bad none of us are on-the-going anywhere, these days.

Quibi divides its shows into three categories: "Movies in Chapters" (read: serialized narrative), "Unscripted and Documentaries" (read: episodic nonfiction) and "Daily Essentials."

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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