Puzzle: Around The World Jumble

Jul 26, 2020

On-air challenge: I'm going to give you some words. For each one, change one letter to two new letters to name a country.

Example. Belle --> Belize

1. Fence
2. Grace
3. Brawl
4. No Say
5. Polar
6. Debark
7. Brunt
8. Mondo
9. Malaria
10. Panda (three different answers)

Last week's challenge: From listener James Matthews, of Little Rock, Ark. Think of a six-letter word for something you might wear. Insert an "O" in the exact middle, and you'll get a phrase meaning "Not aware." What is it?

Challenge answer: Outfit --> Out of it

Winner: Flora Kupferman of San Francisco.

This week's challenge: From listener Dominick Talvacchio of Chicago. Think of a common two-word phrase for something you experience in a desert. Rearrange the letters to get a single word for something you should do in the desert as a result.

Submit Your Answer

If you know the answer to next week's challenge, submit it here. Listeners who submit correct answers win a chance to play the on-air puzzle. Important: Include a phone number where we can reach you by Thursday, July 30, at 3 p.m. ET.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

SARAH MCCAMMON, HOST:

Time to play The Puzzle.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MCCAMMON: Joining us is Will Shortz. He's puzzle editor for The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzlemaster.

Hey, Will.

WILL SHORTZ, BYLINE: Good morning, Sarah. Welcome back.

MCCAMMON: Thank you. And remind us, if you would, Will, of last week's challenge.

SHORTZ: Yeah. It came from listener James Matthews of Little Rock, Ark. I said, think of a six-letter word for something you might wear. Insert an O in the exact middle, and you'll get a phrase meaning not aware. What is it? Well, the thing you wear is an outfit. Insert an O, and you get out of it, which is not aware.

MCCAMMON: I racked my brain, and I couldn't come up with that one, I have to admit. But we got more than 2,100 correct responses. And the winner is Flora Kupferman of San Francisco, Calif.

Congratulations, Flora. And welcome to the program.

FLORA KUPFERMAN: Thank you.

MCCAMMON: So how'd you figure this one out?

KUPFERMAN: This was one of those times where it just popped into my head. I actually saw the word the minute you gave the challenge.

MCCAMMON: Well, Flora, you're a real pro here. I hear this is actually your second time winning. When did you first begin playing this game?

KUPFERMAN: Very, very long time ago, back in, as they say, the postcard days. And I can't remember exactly, but I think the first time I won was about 25 years ago.

MCCAMMON: Amazing. And I gather there's a story about that first WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin that you won.

KUPFERMAN: There is. I wore it proudly on my lapel of my outer coat, and it fell off and got lost. And a very good friend of mine, Ellen Brosby (ph), wrote to NPR for years. And just under a year ago, someone sent me a replacement lapel pin.

MCCAMMON: Wait. Your friend was writing to NPR year after year trying to get this replaced for you? (Laughter) That is amazing. Well, they are highly coveted pins, like all public radio swag.

KUPFERMAN: (Laughter) Now I don't wear it. But now that I'm getting a second one, I will.

MCCAMMON: Well, Flora, are you ready to play?

KUPFERMAN: I am.

MCCAMMON: OK. Will, let's take it away.

SHORTZ: All right. Flora and Sarah, I'm going to give you some words. For each one, change one letter to two new letters to name a country. For example, if I said belle - B-E-L-L-E - you would say Belize, changing the second L to I-Z. OK. Number one is fence - F-E-N-C-E.

KUPFERMAN: France.

SHORTZ: Excellent. Number two is grace - G-R-A-C-E.

KUPFERMAN: Greece.

SHORTZ: Oh, yeah. Brawl - B-R-A-W-L.

KUPFERMAN: Brazil.

SHORTZ: Yes. No say - N-O S-A-Y.

KUPFERMAN: Oh, no. A hint?

MCCAMMON: Think of it as one word, maybe.

SHORTZ: Change the S - N-O, blank, blank, A-Y.

KUPFERMAN: Norway.

SHORTZ: Norway is it. Good. Polar - P-O-L-A-R.

KUPFERMAN: Poland.

SHORTZ: Yes. Debark - D-E-B-A-R-K. Try changing the B.

KUPFERMAN: Denmark.

SHORTZ: Denmark is it. Malaria - M-A-L-A-R-I-A. And change the R.

KUPFERMAN: Malaysia.

SHORTZ: That's it. And the last one has three different answers for the same word. The word is panda - P-A-N-D-A. And you can make three different answers from this.

KUPFERMAN: Panama.

SHORTZ: Panama is it. Good. And the other two answers both involve changing the P.

KUPFERMAN: Rwanda.

SHORTZ: Yes. And also in Africa...

MCCAMMON: It almost rhymes.

SHORTZ: Starts with a vowel. And specifically, starts with a U.

KUPFERMAN: Oh, Uganda.

SHORTZ: Uganda's it. Good job.

MCCAMMON: All right. Great job, Flora. How do you feel?

KUPFERMAN: Thank you. Oh, this was so much fun. What an honor.

MCCAMMON: You did great. And for playing our puzzle today, you will get another WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin, as well as puzzle books and games. You can read all about it at npr.org/puzzle. And, Flora, which member station do you listen to?

KUPFERMAN: KQED, 88.5. I'm a sustaining member.

MCCAMMON: Flora Kupferman from San Francisco, Calif.

Thanks again for playing The Puzzle.

KUPFERMAN: Thank you.

MCCAMMON: All right, Will. What's next week's challenge?

SHORTZ: Yes. It comes from listener Dominick Talvacchio of Chicago. Think of a common two-word phrase for something you experience in a desert. Rearrange the letters to get a single word for something you should do in the desert as a result. What is it? So again, a common two-word phrase for something you experience in a desert. Rearrange the letters to get a single word for something you should do in the desert as a result. What is it?

MCCAMMON: And when you have the answer, go to our website, npr.org/puzzle, and click on the submit your answer link. Remember, just one entry, please. Our deadline for entries is Thursday, July 30, at 3 p.m. Eastern time. Include a phone number where we can reach you at about that time. If you're the winner, we will give you a call, and you'll get to play on the air with the puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzlemaster, Will Shortz.

Thank you so much, Will.

SHORTZ: Thanks a lot, Sarah.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC) Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.