Nation/World

Eight states are experimenting with cloud seeding to try to create more precipitation to mitigate the effects of the drought that is gripping much of the western U.S. But how well does it work?

Host Peter O’Dowd talks to Chelsea Harvey, who covers climate science for E&E News, about the technology behind cloud seeding and whether it’s effective.

On Friday, President Biden is meeting with Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga at the White House. Suga is the first foreign leader to meet with Biden in person since the president took office.

NPR’s Ayesha Roscoe tells us what to expect.

This article was originally published on WBUR.org.

As the country awaits a verdict in the murder trial of Derek Chauvin, and presses for details and justice following the nearby police shooting of Daunte Wright, a new graphic video has surfaced from Chicago.

The number of people moving to the state of Maine rose sharply in 2020. Many were fleeing dense urban areas and lured by the prospect of working from home.

Fred Bever of Maine Public Radio looks at how these COVID-19 refugees have upended the state’s housing market and may help reverse Maine’s long-running population decline.

This week, Kansas City’s Parks and Recreation Board of Commissioners voted to rename a large section of two parkways after Martin Luther King Jr.

The vote comes after voters chose in 2019 to remove King’s name from another well-known boulevard in the city.

Here & Now‘s Tonya Mosley gets the latest from KCUR reporter Luke Martin.

Updated April 16, 2021 at 1:50 PM ET

A heavy metal musician and founding member of the Oath Keepers extremist group pleaded guilty Friday to charges connected to the storming of the U.S. Capitol and agreed to cooperate with investigators — a first in the massive probe into the deadly Jan. 6 assault.

Nothing is as simple as it seems on the surface. Every situation is rich with nuance, there are a million questions to be asked, things to be taken into consideration. In life, there is rarely a quick fix, and Julien Baker knows that.

Check-In: American Citizen Ophira Eisenberg

21 hours ago

Ask Me Another host Ophira Eisenberg and Jonathan Coulton discuss Ophira's new American citizenship status and how her test proctor is a fan of the show.

Heard on Yo-Yo Ma: Civic Duty

Food Jazz

21 hours ago

Chefs Sohla El-Waylly (Ancient Recipes with Sohla) and Stella Parks (author of Bravetart) flex their food muscles as they create meals out of random items from the Ask Me Another pantry.

Heard on Yo-Yo Ma: Civic Duty

Category Is!

21 hours ago

Sohla El-Waylly (Ancient Recipes with Sohla) and Stella Parks (Bravetart) play an Ask Me Another challenge specifically tailored to their interests. Tarot, Marvel characters and horrors films, oh my!

Heard on Yo-Yo Ma: Civic Duty

History of Libraries

21 hours ago

Timothy Simons (Veep, The Pole) and Theodore Bressman (The Pole) are quizzed on their library knowledge. Can they Dewey Decimate this quiz?

Heard on Yo-Yo Ma: Civic Duty

Not A Lot of Hair Metal

21 hours ago

Timothy Simons (Veep, The Pole) and Theodore Bressman (The Pole) listen to hair metal songs rewritten to be about fictional characters who don't have a lot of hair.

Heard on Yo-Yo Ma: Civic Duty

Yo-Yo Ma: Beginner's Mind

21 hours ago

World-renowned musician Yo-Yo Ma began his musical journey at just 2-and-a-half years old when his parents placed a violin in his hands, "I was very bad and I gave it up. And my parents thought, "well the boy is just not musically talented." He rebounded quickly when at the age of 4, Ma was introduced to the cello.

Musical curiosity runs deep in the Ma family. Recently, Ma's grandson took an interest in his cello. "He figured out how to open the case, take the cello out and everything," Ma said. "He wants to take over. I don't need the competition. Just stay away, I need my job!"

Updated April 16, 2021 at 8:45 PM ET

The White House has walked back its announcement that it will keep this year's historically low refugee ceiling of 15,000 set by the Trump administration, saying its earlier statement Friday, which was panned by fellow Democrats, was meant only to ease restrictions from countries from which refugees are currently banned.

The White House said President Biden would raise the cap by May 15.

Simon & Schuster has scrapped its plans to distribute a book written by one of the Louisville police officers who shot Breonna Taylor, after news of its publication ignited widespread criticism.

Government officials are trying to figure out how to make better use of drugs that can keep people with COVID-19 out of the hospital. That's an urgent but daunting challenge in Michigan, where hospitals are struggling to keep up with a surge in new cases.

The Biden administration will send $1.7 billion to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and local and state governments and other research efforts, starting early next month to find and track coronavirus variants lurking in the United States. Already, the more contagious U.K. variant, B.1.1.7, is now the dominant strain in this country, fueling surges in Michigan and the Northeast.

"This release includes bug fixes, increased stability and performance improvements."

The routine software update may be one of the most familiar and least understood parts of our digital lives. A pop-up window announces its arrival and all that is required of us is to plug everything in before bed. The next morning, rather like the shoemaker and the elves, our software is magically transformed.

Next week, President Biden will announce a number that could shape the rest of his presidency: a new goal to cut U.S. greenhouse gas emissions.

CAPE TOWN, South AfricaIn South Africa, the government tried to control the COVID-19 outbreak by banning booze to keep people from gathering. Plus, sober South Africans were less likely to violently protest a complete lockdown.

You couldn't sit at a bar; you couldn't order a glass of wine; you couldn't even buy beer at the store.

There was an immediate public health benefit that had nothing to do with COVID-19. Suddenly, emergency rooms were empty, devoid of alcohol-related accidents.

This week marks what would have been the 50th birthday of Selena Quintanilla Perez, the popular musical superstar known by her legions of fans simply as Selena. Though she's been gone for over a quarter century, she seems more popular than ever. Why is it that 26 years after her death at age 23, Selena is experiencing such a remarkable revival? And has she ever really been that far from our thoughts or our playlists?

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Muslims marked the beginning of the holy month of Ramadan this week. For roughly the next three weeks, Muslims who are able are told to fast from dawn to dusk.

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For Tiny Desk Playlists, we ask musicians, creators and folks we admire to choose the Tiny Desk concerts they've come to love. For this edition, comedian and actor KevOnStage picks his five favorites.

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Science labs across the country are running low on crucial equipment.

Sally Herships from the Planet Money team asked, why is that?

BEIJING — Nine veteran activists and lawmakers in Hong Kong have been sentenced to prison terms of up to 18 months because of their participation in anti-government protests nearly two years ago.

Media mogul Jimmy Lai received one year in prison, while prominent lawyers Margaret Ng and Martin Lee received suspended sentences of 12 and 11 months respectively, meaning if they are not convicted of another crime in the next two years, they will not have to spend time behind bars. The heaviest sentence of 18 months was meted out to Lee Cheuk-yan, an activist and former lawmaker.

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