Nation/World

Fetal tissue is uniquely valuable to medical researchers - useful for developing treatments and better understanding diseases like HIV, Parkinson's, and COVID-19.

But many anti-abortion rights groups oppose it on moral or religious grounds.

Now, Health and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra says he's reversing several restrictions on fetal tissue research put in place during the Trump administration.

All federal prison inmates will have the opportunity to receive a vaccine by mid-May, according to the director of the Federal Bureau of Prisons, Michael Carvajal.

Vaccines have already been made available to all federal prison staff, he said, speaking before the Senate Judiciary Committee in a hearing Thursday.

More than 40,000 people incarcerated in federal prisons have received both doses of the vaccine, the bureau says, which is about a third of the people in BOP custody. Nearly 18,000 federal prison staff have been fully vaccinated.

Liberty University is suing former president Jerry Falwell Jr. for millions of dollars, accusing him of withholding damaging personal information from school officials while negotiating a lucrative employment agreement for himself, among other allegations.

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Each week, we answer "frequently asked questions" about life during the coronavirus crisis. If you have a question you'd like us to consider for a future post, email us at goatsandsoda@npr.org with the subject line: "Weekly Coronavirus Questions."

I've been hearing about breakthrough infections in people who have been vaccinated. Should I be worried? What can I do to protect myself?

The short answer:

Attendees of the infamous Fyre Festival didn't exactly get what they paid for in 2017, when they arrived in the Bahamas for a luxury music festival only to find themselves stranded without basic provisions, let alone first-class accommodations.

Some four years later, hundreds of ticket holders are poised to receive more than $7,000 each after settling a class-action lawsuit with event organizers.

The killing of Daunte Wright as the Derek Chauvin trial continues has been dominating the news this week. It’s clear that some people are turning to social media to process their emotions around the news.

But those conversations have also evolved to touch on overall gun violence in America and the trauma that many are feeling.

Signs Of Economic Recovery Accelerate

18 hours ago

A hibernating world economy appears to be waking up. Economic data showed that China’s economy boomed, and the United States may be turning a corner.

Recent numbers indicate that Americans spent big on retail, particularly on clothing, sports equipment, and in restaurants. Jobless claims are also down to 1.2 million fewer than last week.

Frontline In Ukraine Resembles World War I

18 hours ago

As tensions between Ukraine and Russia escalate, CNN’s Matthew Chance gives us a glimpse of conditions on the ground as Ukrainian forces continue to fight with eastern-backed separatists. The international correspondent just returned from a trip to the frontline with Ukraine’s President Volodymyr Zelensky.

The Biden administration wants America to lead a clean energy revolution and create good-paying union jobs in the process. He recently announced infrastructure plans that include offshore wind projects off the East Coast.

This includes Vineyard Wind in Massachusetts which — if approved — will be the biggest and first commercial-scale offshore wind project in the U.S.

Russia retaliated Friday over a new round of U.S. sanctions imposed a day ago by the Biden administration over the SolarWinds cyberattack and the Kremlin's election meddling.

Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said 10 U.S. diplomats will be expelled from Russia, mirroring the 10 Russian diplomats ordered to leave the U.S. on Thursday. Moscow will also add eight U.S. officials to its sanctions list and will restrict the activities of U.S. nongovernmental organizations, or NGOs, operating in Russia.

Updated April 16, 2021 at 3:27 PM ET

A generation of Cuban revolutionaries who seized power more than six decades ago, directly challenging the U.S. and later pushing Washington and Moscow to the brink of nuclear war, is set to exit the stage.

If you were a baseball fan in the ’80s, you knew about “Fernandomania.”

That was the word for the spectacle and excitement surrounding Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Fernando Valenzuela, who made his first start for the team 40 years ago this month. Decades later, he remains a Mexican American icon.

Legendary Dodgers broadcaster Vin Scully has described the frenzy around the star pitcher as a “religious experience.”

A law professor and former federal prosecutor argues that police in Brooklyn Center, Minn., didn't need to pursue Daunte Wright, who was killed by an officer who said she mistakenly shot him instead of using her Taser.

"They have his license plate. They know where he lives," says Georgetown law professor Paul Butler, author of the book Chokehold: Policing Black Men.

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This is FRESH AIR. I'm Dave Davies, in for Terry Gross. Our guest today is author Louise Erdrich. In a career going back to the 1970s, she's published 17 novels and more than 30 books in all, including children's literature, poetry and nonfiction. She won the National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award for fiction twice.

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Calling the U.S. military prison in Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, a "symbol of lawlessness and human rights abuses," two dozen U.S. senators are urging President Biden to shut it down quickly and find new homes for the 40 men remaining there. Many of the detainees have been confined at Guantánamo for nearly two decades without being tried or charged, and some have been cleared for release but are still being held.

A government watchdog says planning and intelligence failures by the Capitol Police contributed to the chaos and deadly violence when insurrectionists stormed the Capitol on Jan. 6.

Inspector General Michael Bolton presented the findings of his investigation into the Capitol Police on Thursday at a congressional committee hearing.

The pandemic. Protests for racial and social justice. An economic crisis.

All of these things and more have impacted every facet of life for many Americans, especially how we work and look for work.

Weekend Edition wants to hear from people who are either entering the workforce during the pandemic or are considering a career change after witnessing all of the events from the past year.

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