Nation/World

As the coronavirus infection rate in the U.S. surpasses 50,000 new cases a day, colleges and universities around the country are trying to figure out how to educate their students this fall while still keeping their campus communities safe.

More than two months after Spc. Vanessa Guillen was last seen at Fort Hood in Texas, Army investigators identified her remains, her family's lawyer Natalie Khawam told NPR on Sunday.

"On July 3rd, the Army called me to confirm that the bones, hair and other remains found belong to Vanessa Guillen," Khawam said in an email. "We are at a loss for words. This should never have happened. Our country has lost a beautiful young soldier because the system is broken."

The University of Washington announced on Sunday that at least 112 fraternity house residents north of its Seattle campus have tested positive for COVID-19, bringing the total number of students infected on Greek Row so far to 121.

The nine additional students who tested positive were close contacts of the residents, but do not live in the fraternity houses, according to a statement from The University of Washington.

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Usually, bartenders at 67 Orange Street in Harlem perform in front of an audience, as they shake, pour, and light drinks on fire. People watch from stools around the bar and tightly packed tables.

Karl Franz Williams started this cocktail bar almost twelve years ago. He's watched people fall in love here and even witnessed a wedding. Williams actually named the bar in honor of a Black-owned, nineteenth century dance hall in Lower Manhattan, Almack's. That dance hall's last known address was 67 Orange Street.

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Coronavirus cases keep increasing at alarming rates across the country, and this comes as many school districts are wrestling with when and how to reopen. It is not an easy decision. There's the issue of safety, and that's complicated because students, teachers and parents all have different COVID-19 risk levels. Then there's how to teach students virtually or partially online and partially in a classroom and how to support low-income students without adequate Internet access and students with learning disabilities.

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Coronavirus cases keep increasing at alarming rates across the country, and this comes as many school districts are wrestling with when and how to reopen. It is not an easy decision. There's the issue of safety, and that's complicated because students, teachers and parents all have different COVID-19 risk levels. Then there's how to teach students virtually or partially online and partially in a classroom and how to support low-income students without adequate Internet access and students with learning disabilities.

SACHA PFEIFFER, HOST:

Coronavirus cases keep increasing at alarming rates across the country, and this comes as many school districts are wrestling with when and how to reopen. It is not an easy decision. There's the issue of safety, and that's complicated because students, teachers and parents all have different COVID-19 risk levels. Then there's how to teach students virtually or partially online and partially in a classroom and how to support low-income students without adequate Internet access and students with learning disabilities.

Nearly 130,000 people in the United States have died from the coronavirus and more than 2,800,000 people have been infected, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

A third former Minneapolis police officer involved in the killing of George Floyd has been released from jail.

According to Hennepin County jail records, Tou Thao was released from custody with conditions on Saturday morning after posting $750,000 bond.

Protesters in Baltimore pulled down a statue of Christopher Columbus and hurled it into the city's Inner Harbor on Saturday night, adding to the list of monuments toppled during nationwide demonstrations against racism and police brutality.

On-air challenge: Every answer today is a word or phrase in which the only consonants are H and T — repeated as often as necessary. All the other letters are vowels.

Example: Eighth letter of the Greek alphabet --> THETA

1. Canine or molar

2. Give a share of one's income to the church

3. Lake straddling the California/Nevada border

4. Country sharing a border with the Dominican Republic

5. Island paradise in the South Pacific

6. Giggle sound

7. Tract of land with low-growing shrubs

8. Kind of yoga

Long before the coronavirus pandemic, tabletop board games were having something of a renaissance, with popular games like The Settlers of Catan and Ticket to Ride becoming mainstream additions to family game nights.

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The coronavirus pandemic may have forced major sports leagues to rethink their seasons, but there's one annual competition that went off without a hitch.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #1: Go.

The sister band HAIM is synonymous with the sound of Los Angeles — sunny, airy and wistful. After a two-month delay due to the coronavirus, sisters Este, Danielle and Alana finally get to share their third record, Women in Music Pt. III, with their fans. NPR's Scott Detrow spoke to the Haim sisters about creating a record that's a little less sun and a little bit more shade as they explore some of the darker challenges that each sister has faced lately. Listen in the audio player above.

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In South Korea, there's a new Chex flavor in the breakfast aisle.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

TAE JIN-AH: (Singing in non-English language).

Treating COVID-19: What We Know Now

Jul 5, 2020

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When the urban planner Robert Moses began building projects in New York during the 1920s, he bulldozed Black and Latino homes to make way for parks, and built highways through the middle of minority neighborhoods. According to one biography, Moses even made sure bridges on the parkways connecting New York City to beaches in Long Island were low enough to keep city buses — which would likely be carrying poor minorities — from passing underneath.

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Ashima Shiraishi, 19, is one of the most talented rock climbers in the world. And she'd like to let you in on a rather unglamorous secret: "Most of climbing, it's you just falling," she says. "Every time you go back at it, you improve slightly."

Shiraishi is the author of a new book called How to Solve a Problem: The Rise (and Falls) of a Rock-Climbing Champion — she says it's about how she approaches all kinds of obstacles.

Julian Bass loves Spider-Man, a trait you can easily glean by scrolling through the videos he posts to his TikTok and Twitter accounts.

"I just think Spider-Man is so fun. It's so inspiring to me," Bass told NPR's Weekend Edition. "Everything, every little aspect that you could possibly think of about Spider-Man is something that I'm aware of, that I know of."

Editor's note: This story was reported and photographed in January, before the global pandemic. The text has been updated to reflect the activities of the nuns aimed at COVID-19 prevention.

Jigme Yeshe Lhamo squats in a powerful kung fu stance. As she raises her 18-inch sword, it flashes in the sunlight against the backdrop of the Himalayas. It's a crisp January morning at Amitabha Drukpa Nunnery in Kathmandu Valley, home to more than 800 Himalayan Buddhist nuns ranging in age from 6 to 80.

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