News

Reporting on gun violence in Chicago primarily focuses only on those killed.  But shooting survivors often struggle to come to terms with what happened.  In some cases, it takes years to overcome the trauma.  Others never get past it.  A shooting survivor shares his story. 

Illinois was struggling to attract and keep teachers prior to last year.  The pandemic has made things worse.  We'll hear some possible solutions. 

And a journalist who covered the 1970 Illinois Constitutional Convention shares his thoughts on the work done more than 50 years ago and how it has held up through the years.  

That and more on this episode of Statewide.

via IDES website

  

GOP lawmakers are again demanding answers from Gov. JB Pritzker and the Illinois Department of Employment Securities over the state’s processing of unemployment benefits. 

Photo Credit: John Minchillo/Associated Press

WASHINGTON – Angry supporters of President Donald Trump have stormed the U.S. Capitol in a chaotic protest aimed at thwarting a peaceful transfer of power. They have forced lawmakers to be rushed from the building and interrupted challenges to Joe Biden’s Electoral College victory. Trump issued a restrained call for peace but did not call on his supporters to leave. Earlier, in a huge rally near the White House, the president had egged his supporters on to march to Capitol Hill.

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UIS.edu

Lunch & Learn Series:  Societal Norms - Now and Then

Panelists

 

  • Dr. Sean McCandless, Assistant Professor and Assoc. Director, DPA Program
  • Dr. Jason Pierceson, Professor, Political Science

 Moderator

  • Rachel Otwell, Staff Writer, Illinois Times

 Presented by:

  • UIS Office of Advancement
  • UIS Alumni SAGE Society
  • Illinois State Historical Society

 

An education advocacy group says Illinois schools should plan to make up time lost to the Coronavirus pandemic, perhaps by extending the school day or year.

That’s one recommendation in a recent report from Advance Illinois. Another way to help fill in the gaps could be offering extensive tutoring, according to the report.

The organization in the fall conducted focus groups with 120 students, parents and caregivers to learn about their experiences during the pandemic.

Google Maps

Every decade, the year after a Census, state lawmakers are tasked with adopting new legislative maps for Illinois, which can shift the balance of power in certain areas with demographic changes.

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UIS.edu

Lunch & Learn Series:  The American People, Government, Finances and the Public TrustPresented by the UIS Office of Advancement

Panelists:

  • Rich Miller, Owner and Publisher, Capitol Fax.com
  • Dr. Kenneth Kriz, Distinguished Professor, Public Administration & Director, Institute for Illinois Public Finance
  • The Honorable Tim Butler, Illinois State Representative

 Moderator: Dr. Robert Smith, Dean, College of Public Affairs and Administration Presented by:

Some Springfield public school students will return to classrooms next Tuesday. In a 4-3 vote, District 186 board members approved offering a hybrid learning model, where students attend in-person two days per week and remotely the other days. Families also have the option to remain online-only.

Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois

  Illinois House Republicans say they’re still waiting on Gov. JB Pritzker to propose specific spending cuts to the state’s current year state budget, which is $4 billion out of balance.

ilga.gov

Democratic state Sen. Andy Manar of downstate Bunker Hill announced Monday he will resign from the General Assembly effective Jan. 17 to join the governor’s office as an advisor two days later.

Memorial Health System

As distribution of the new COVID-19 vaccine continues, some Illinois leaders are turning their attention to encouraging vaccine use, particularly among communities of color.

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UIS.edu

Fall 2020 UIS Lunch & Learn Series - Streaming the Future:  Impact of Cable News Networks and Social Media

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Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

The panel marks the end of 2020 and looks ahead to 2021, joined by Amanda Vinicky of Chicago's WTTW.

Office of state Rep. Sonya Harper

State Rep. Sonya Harper was among the most vocal critics of Governor J.B. Pritzker’s attempt to distribute cannabis dispensary licenses through a lottery.

The scoring put minority applicants at a disadvantage, said Harper, a Chicago Democrat who is the new chairwoman of the Illinois Legislative Black Caucus. 

Now, Harper says she likes efforts by the administration to slow down and rethink the process. The caucus wants to see changes in the cannabis tax act that would include the creation of a social equity commission.

Sen. Bill Brady, R-Bloomington
Brian Mackey/WUIS

Illinois Senate Republican Leader Bill Brady (R-Bloomington) will resign his Senate seat effective 11:59 p.m. on Thursday — New Year’s Eve.

It has been a year since Illinois legalized recreational adult use cannabis.  And despite the pandemic, marijuana sales beat expectations.  We'll hear from a reporter who covers the industry about where it goes from here.

We'll also learn about a mental health crisis clinic in central Illinois.  

That and more on this episode of Statewide.

State Week logo (capitol dome)
Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

This week, Washington D.C. worked on a new COVID-19 pandemic stimulus package, while the first batch of vaccines continue to be distributed to health care workers.  Meanwhile, Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot is facing criticism for her handling of a new scandal involving the Chicago Police Department.

Greg Hinz of Crain’s Chicago Business joins the panel.


 

The first shipment of the Pfizer-BioNTech coronavirus vaccine arrived in Illinois at the state's Strategic National Stockpile on Monday, Dec. 14.
Screenshot from video provided by Gov. J.B. Pritzker's office

The same day the first employees at Memorial Health System hospitals in central Illinois were getting vaccinated against the coronavirus, an internal blog post was published: “Debunking COVID-19 Vaccination Myths.”

There is a lot of incivility in the public sphere and that includes comments about politicians.  While their decisions are fair game for critiques, often it gets more personal.  That includes attacks on their appearance.  Take Gov. J.B. Pritzker for example.   Some have used derogatory terms to poke fun at his weight.  A newspaper columnist says it's no laughing matter.  

We also recall the violent and bloody era of prohibition-era gangsters in southern Illinois.  

That and more on this week's Statewide.

Courtesy of @JeromeAdamsMD on Twitter

  More than 63,000 frontline healthcare workers in Illinois have been vaccinated for COVID-19 in the last week — on top of thousands more healthcare workers in the city of Chicago.

Abraham Lincoln Presidential LIbrary and Museum

Citizens of Illinois, I believe, should measure the product of our efforts by these tests: Is the Constitution of 1970 superior to the Constitution of 1870? Is the Constitution of 1970 relevant to the problems of our state at this time? By either test, I submit, the 1970 Constitution possesses a more efficient and economical governmental structure, while strengthening at the same time our commitment to the human needs of our people… the 1970 Constitution talks to a human purpose and a human society.

hand sanitizer outside the governor's office suite in the Illinois State Captiol Building
Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois

Illinois lawmakers have not officially met for a full legislative session day since late May — more than 200 days ago.

Illinois Department of Veterans' Affairs

The November COVID-19 outbreak at the LaSalle Veterans’ home has killed a 34th resident, the facility reported Friday — just as attorneys for four families of dead residents announced forthcoming lawsuits against the state.

State Week logo (capitol dome)
Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

This week, Governor J.B. Pritzker announced $700 million in cuts to the current fiscal year's state budget; a special investigating committee looking into House Speaker Michael Madigan's involvement in the ComEd bribery scandal wrapped up with no action; and Pritzker continues to weather criticism of his administration's handling of the deadly COVID-19 outbreak at the LaSalle Veterans' Home.

Tony Arnold of WBEZ and Rick Pearson of the Chicago Tribune join the panel this week.

Dr. Prashant Jagtap, St. John’s Hospital medical director of critical care, was among the first to receive the Pfizer-BioNTech coronavirus vaccine Wednesday.
HSHS St. John's Hospital

Hundreds of nurses, doctors and other medical staff at central Illinois hospitals received their first dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech coronavirus vaccine this week.

On this episode of Statewide, the Bergner's chain liquidated in 2018, the final chapter in a retail history that dated back to the 1800s.  For some communities, Bergner's was a an anchor store in a shopping mall.  In Peoria, where it all began, the name meant a lot more.  We'll talk with a Peoria journalist about Bergner's -- from its start through its heyday -- and how it all ended.

We'll also recall the holiday shopping traditions at the former Marshall Field's in Chicago. 

And we'll look back on the year in Springfield with various community leaders and their hopes for 2021 in the capital city.  

Springfield Dreams: Visions Of 2021 And Beyond

Dec 17, 2020

A pandemic, a civil rights uprising, economic turmoil, an historic election – this year has brought many hardships. It has made the inequalities and divisions in our society clearer. It’s also been a time for reflection and change.

John Stremsterfer is the President and CEO of the Community Foundation for the Land of LincolnHe comes back on Community Voices to give an update on The Next 10 project and more with Community Voices' Randy Eccles.

Ameilia Hopkins is a high school student from Pleasant Plains, Illinois. She is a former Podcast Academy participant and has used skills learned in the program to help other people and organziations. Ameilia talks about this and more with Community Voices' Bea Bonner and Randy Eccles. 

Measures of child well-being have declined during the last 10 months as the COVID-19 pandemic has raged. But those economic, health and educational effects have taken the greatest toll on children from Black and Brown families.

A new 50-state report published this week by the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s Kids Count program quantified the damage. Kids Count analyzes surveys of families compiled by the U.S. Census Bureau.

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