Health+Harvest

NPR Illinois Community Advisory Board identified the subject of food and health as important subjects for coverage in 2012. Health+Harvest provides for community engagement on health and food issues along with reporting on farm, field and fuel.  From seed to plate, from farmer's markets to GMOs, central Illinoisans need to know how to stay healthy and what they are eating.  In 2013, NPR Illinois joined a consortium of public media in the Harvest Public Media network.  The network provides broader coverage to Midwest food issues.

By examining these local, regional and national issues and their implications with in-depth and unbiased reporting, Health+Harvest fills a critical information void.

Support for Health+Harvest coverage comes from Central Illinois Farm Bureaus and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.  If you'd like to support this initiative, please contact Nice Bogdanovich at 217-206-9847.

The brown walls are peeling at all ends. Giant paint chips cake the ceiling. And the cash register — if you can call it that — is just a series of old wooden drawers.

"I'm going to put up a sign that says 'Enter at your own risk.' Otherwise someone is going to hold me liable," says Romin Kohinoor, one of the owners of the nearly century-old Britannia & Co., one of Mumbai's last Parsi cafes.

Luckily for Kohinoor, these quirky interiors have long been seen as more of an attraction than a liability.

For decades, doctors and nurses from rich countries have flown to poor countries to perform surgery and provide other medical care not readily available. They stay for a limited period of time. Then they head back home.

That model for providing care is being reconsidered, as health reporter Joanne Silberner wrote in a story we published this spring.

I don't remember when the concept of consent as it relates to sex became part of my vocabulary, but it shapes how I approach my personal relationships and affects the way I move through the world. I was shaken when the #MeToo movement exploded, not only by the stories of sexual assault and harassment but also by the stories of women who had felt pressured or coerced into having sex they didn't want.

Anyone who was in Panama City, Fla., last year when Hurricane Michael hit has a story to tell. Christina Harding rode out the storm with her mother, daughter and two nephews. "It was crazy," she says. "We had to tie the door shut because Michael was trying to come into the house with us, which was not what we wanted. It was like bam, bam, bam, bam. Like somebody trying to get in, you know?"

Another Tick-Borne Disease To Worry About

Jun 1, 2019

When a tick bores into your skin, anchoring itself for what can be a leisurely meal while often spreading germs, it isn't just Lyme disease that you have to worry about.

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Shipping containers of Canadian trash have moldered in the Philippines for years, in a situation so irksome to Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte that he threatened to personally sail it back to Canadian waters.

Now, much of the trash that arrived in 2013 and 2014 is on its way back to Canada. The Canadian government says that 69 shipping containers of rubbish have left the Philippines and are expected to reach Canada by the end of June.

A Missouri judge has blocked the state's attempt to close down Missouri's last abortion provider.

Missouri Circuit Court Judge Michael Stelzer granted a request to temporarily prevent state officials from revoking the license of a clinic operated by a St. Louis Planned Parenthood chapter, as the state's health department had sought to do.

If the license is not renewed, Missouri will become the first state without a clinic providing abortions since the procedure became legal 46 years ago.

The Food and Drug Administration is holding its first public hearing on CBD, the cannabis extract that has quickly grown into a billion-dollar industry. Today's hearing will help officials determine how to regulate CBD products.

The compound can be extracted from marijuana or from hemp. It's promoted as a way to ease anxiety and inflammation – and it doesn't get people high because it doesn't contain THC, the psychoactive component of the cannabis plant.

What's Doctor Burnout Costing America?

May 31, 2019

Doctor burnout is costing the U.S. health care system a lot — roughly $4.6 billion a year, according to a study published this week in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

"Everybody who goes into medicine knows that it's a stressful career and that it's a lot of hard work," says Lotte Dyrbye, a physician and professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., who co-authored the study.

Updated at 9:35 p.m. ET

The Arkansas River just keeps rising. The usually placid tributary of the Mississippi has become a bloated torrent carrying entire trees downstream, drowning riverfront property and halting commerce for hundreds of miles.

As rural hospital closures roil the country, some states are banking on a rescue from a Trump administration proposal to change the way hospital payments are calculated.

The goal of the proposal, unveiled by Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Administrator Seema Verma in April, is to bump up Medicare's reimbursements to rural hospitals, some of which receive the lowest rates in the nation.

Imagine for a minute: A company makes a vaccine that protects kids from a life-threatening disease but, with little warning, decides to stop selling it in the U.S.

That's exactly what happened last year in West Africa, for a vaccine against rotavirus — a disease that kills about 200,000 young children and babies each year.

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee has not been shy about framing his candidacy to become the 2020 Democratic nominee for president around global climate change.

In his policy proposal he says that defeating climate change is the "defining challenge of our time," and that it is incumbent upon the next president of the United States to make that challenge a priority.

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The president of the United States effectively gave Mexico an order last night.

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The Food and Drug Administration is going to hold a hearing today to help determine how to regulate CBD. CBD is an extract of the cannabis plants, which is said to help relieve anxiety and inflammation. NPR's Allison Aubrey reports.

Food Waste and Trash Cooking Collection

May 31, 2019

In recent years, food waste has become an increasingly serious problem for which we need to work as individuals, a society, and an international community to find solutions.

To learn more about some of the things that are being done -- and how you can help -- we encourage our fans to listen to Just Eat It: Why Food Waste Matters, a special food waste show produced by our partners at The Water Main, a water-focused content and awareness initiative at America Public Media.

In our episode One Cook's Trash... we talked a lot about food wasted at home. The other thing that a lot of cooks think about is how much plastic we trash in our kitchens. Managing Producer Sally Swift went to Lisa McManus, America’s Test Kitchen’s director of product testings, to see how to replace plastic wrap and baggies with reusables. Listen to their coversation with the audio player above. Lisa also gave us lists of and more information about America's Test Kitchen's recommended reusable kitchen tools. Find them below.

France has a complex relationship with le doggie bag

May 31, 2019

Restaurant food waste is a worldwide problem that’s led to economic, environmental, and social woes. In many countries, the problem is reduced by allowing diners to take their unfinished food home. But one country resists this trend. Field reporter Judith Kogan brings us this story from Paris.

FIELD PIECE TRANSCRIPTION:

 

Photo: Chef Abra Berens looks through Francis Lam's refrigerator for food that can be salvaged before it becomes trash.

 

About ten years ago, Homa Dashtaki was laid off from her dream job, and was not in a good place. Her father was dealing with the death of his brother. And to keep themselves preoccupied so they couldn’t dwell on their sadness, they started making yogurt together. They strained it, so it was thick and rich, and that yogurt became the basis for Homa’s company, The White Moustache. It’s become a cult favorite, with magazines like Bon Appetit singing its praises.

Deadly tornadoes have been ripping through parts of the Unites States for weeks. Storms have been leaving a trail of destruction from Texas all the way up to Maryland, and on Monday, 52 tornadoes may have touched down across eight states, says the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Patrick Marsh, a meteorologist at the NOAA's Storm Prediction Center, says it's unusual to have this kind of sustained tornado activity.

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The number of new measles cases in the United States so far this year has hit 971, exceeding a record established 25 years ago that covered a whole year of new measles cases, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported on Thursday.

Farmers have been using the weed killer glyphosate – a key ingredient of the product Roundup – at soaring levels even as glyphosate has become increasingly less effective and as health concerns and lawsuits mount.

Nationwide, the use of glyphosate on crops increased from 13.9 million pounds in 1992 to 287 million pounds in 2016, according to estimates by the U.S. Geological Survey.

In the hope of finding a new way to fight malaria, scientists have used a spider gene to genetically engineer a fungus to produce a venom that can quickly kill mosquitoes.

The modified fungus was a highly effective mosquito killer in the first tests mimicking conditions in sub-Saharan Africa, where malaria remains a major public health problem, researchers reported Thursday in the journal Science.

Because of her food journalism, the food world has been well aware of Samin Nosrat for several years. But she became a household name when two things happened: First, her book, Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat: Mastering the Elements of Good Cooking, became a runaway bestseller. The book explores the mysteries of cooking for the home chef and garnered just about every award a cookbook could get.

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