Health+Harvest

NPR Illinois Community Advisory Board identified the subject of food and health as important subjects for coverage in 2012. Health+Harvest provides for community engagement on health and food issues along with reporting on farm, field and fuel.  From seed to plate, from farmer's markets to GMOs, central Illinoisans need to know how to stay healthy and what they are eating.  In 2013, NPR Illinois joined a consortium of public media in the Harvest Public Media network.  The network provides broader coverage to Midwest food issues.

By examining these local, regional and national issues and their implications with in-depth and unbiased reporting, Health+Harvest fills a critical information void.

Support for Health+Harvest coverage comes from Central Illinois Farm Bureaus and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.  If you'd like to support this initiative, please contact Nice Bogdanovich at 217-206-9847.

In late August 2019, Shannon Harness awoke to serious pain in the lower right side of his abdomen — a telltale sign of appendicitis.

Harness booked it to the emergency room of the only hospital in the county: Heart of the Rockies Regional Medical Center in Salida, Colo. After a CT scan, doctors told Harness he had acute appendicitis and required immediate surgery.

A surgeon performed an appendectomy that night and released Harness the next day.

Updated at 9:42 p.m. ET

After a pressure campaign by people with President Trump's ear, the Army Corps of Engineers says a proposed open-pit gold mine upstream from Alaska's most valuable salmon fishery can't proceed as the developers hoped. It's not an outright veto of the mine, but some of the groups fighting the project say the years-long battle is as good as won.

Until now, the Pebble Mine seemed on track to get its federal permit as early as this fall, to the alarm of fishermen and Alaska Native organizations.

In Germany, several thousand volunteers attended a pop-up concert as part of an experiment to understand how COVID-19 spreads in large-scale stadium events — and how to prevent it.

The Food and Drug Administration has given the green light to expand the use of blood plasma in treating hospitalized COVID-19 patients.

The emergency use authorization announced Sunday involves convalescent plasma — taking antibodies from the blood of people who have recovered from COVID-19. That plasma is then given to patients currently sick in hopes that the antibodies will help fight off the disease.

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The number of confirmed coronavirus cases linked to a wedding reception earlier this month in Maine continues to rise.

At least 53 people have been infected with the virus, officials with the Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention reported over the weekend, according to the Portland Press Herald.

The paper notes that state health investigators have traced both "secondary and tertiary transmission of the virus."

Updated at 8:01 p.m. ET

California Gov. Gavin Newsom offered a litany of devastating statistics Monday as hundreds of thousands of acres continue to burn across California in some of the largest wildfires in state history.

On a cool February morning, around 60 people gathered in the Sierra Nevada foothills to take part in a ceremony that, for many decades, was banned.

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What would President Trump do with four more years in office?

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Leslie Cutitta said yes, twice, when clinicians from Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston called asking whether she wanted them to take — and then continue — extreme measures to keep her husband, Frank Cutitta, alive.

The first conversation, in late March, was about whether to let Frank go or to try some experimental drugs and treatments. The second call was just a few days later. Hospital visits were banned, so Leslie Cutitta couldn't be with her husband or discuss his wishes with the medical team in person. So she used stories to try to describe Frank's zest for life.

At 3 a.m. on Friday morning, biologist Kelly Sorenson was awake, nervously watching the live webcam feed of a California condor nest on the Big Sur coast. He could see a 5-month-old chick, still unable to fly, as the flames of the Dolan Fire came into view.

"It was just terrifying," Sorenson said. "Having the live-streaming webcams was both a blessing and a nightmare because we had to watch the fire as it burned through the canyon."

The number of confirmed coronavirus deaths in the U.S. continues to climb.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as of Sunday there have been 175,651 lives lost to the virus and 5.64 million total cases. The death count rose by just over a thousand from the day before, the CDC reported.

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Georgia To Hold Virtual Peachtree 10K Race

Aug 23, 2020

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California will be under a state of emergency this weekend, as more than 500 fires rage across the state.

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Nick Gutierrez of Watsonville, Calif., near Santa Cruz, is 57 years old, married, has an adult son, a daughter who's in college. And when he has time to himself...

NICK GUTIERREZ: I do yardwork. I like cycling a lot.

Jerome Antone says he is one of the lucky ones.

After becoming ill with COVID-19, Antone was hospitalized only 65 miles away from his small Alabama town. He is the mayor of Georgiana — population 1,700.

"It hit our rural community so rabid," Antone says. The town's hospital closed last year. If hospitals in nearby communities don't have beds available, "you may have to go four or five hours away."

After five months working shifts at an emergency department in Oakland, Douglas Frey says he's mentally and physically spent. Most days the tall, athletic-looking 47-year-old nurse ends his shift depleted by what he calls an undercurrent of tension.

Theaters around the country have begun showing the first new movie since the coronavirus pandemic shuttered cinemas: an audacious road rage movie titled Unhinged, starring Russell Crowe.

The $30 million dollar movie opened internationally, where it's been number one at the box office in some countries. Now it's playing in the U.S., where 70% of theaters are now open, except in Los Angeles, New York or other cities where the numbers of coronavirus cases are high.

Wildfires ignited by nearly 12,000 lightning strikes over the past three days continue to spread havoc across a heat wave-baked California, with little relief in sight.

"Just a day ago, I announced that we are struggling to address the needs of suppressing some 376 fires in this state," Gov. Gavin Newsom said at a Friday news conference. "That number has grown to about 560 fires in the state of California.

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