Equity & Justice

Race, Ethnicity, Gender, Culture, Income, and Justice

Jazz as sacred music within and beyond the boundaries of the organized African American church.

Song List

  • Brother Ah, "Wade in the Water"
  • Pharoah Sanders, "Kazuko"
  • Pharoah Sanders, "The Creator Has a Master Plan"
  • Sun Ra, "Saturn"
  • Sun Ra, "Enlightenment"

Virtuoso performances created by masters and documented through audio recordings that set the mold for specific vocal and performance styles.

Song List

  • Gospel Harmonettes, "Wade in the Water"
  • Gospel Harmonettes, "Get Away Jordan"
  • Gospel Harmonettes, "You Can't Hurry God"
  • Davis Sisters, "Keeping Me Alive"

Code Switch Book Club, Summer 2019

Jun 20, 2019

A few of the great books that our listeners recommend for summer reading.
Shereen Marisol Meraji / NPR

So, Fam: We ask

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The Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum

 It was a logical step for a state that granted suffrage rights years before.   

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House Holds Hearing On Reparations

Jun 19, 2019

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For the first time in a decade Congress will hold a hearing Wednesday on the subject of reparations for the descendants of slaves in the United States, a topic that has gained traction in the run-up to the 2020 elections.

The hearing is set for June 19, also known as "Juneteenth," the day when in 1865 former enslaved people in Texas first learned that they had been emancipated two years earlier.

Why did Reconstruction fail? It's a heady question for American historians — not least because despite seminal scholarship on the subject, from W.E.B. Du Bois' Black Reconstruction in America and Eric Foner's Reconstruction: America's Unfinished Revolution, key elements are still missing in our narratives about Reconstruction.

An NPR investigation has uncovered new evidence in a prominent unsolved murder case from the civil rights era, including the identity of an attacker who admitted his involvement but was never charged.

The murder of Boston minister James Reeb in 1965 drew national attention at the time and spurred passage of the Voting Rights Act, which outlawed the Jim Crow voting practices that had disenfranchised millions of black Americans.

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Annie E. Casey Foundation

Looking at the well-being of Illinois’ children through a racial lens … shows big disparities, according to the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s annual KIDS count report.

Racial disparities show up on measures of health, educational achievement, and economic well-being.

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Dr. Ayaz Virji was a Muslim living in small-town, white America.

He had left a good job in a leadership position at a successful hospital in Harrisburg, Penn., in order to practice medicine in a rural, underserved area.

Virji says he "had the BMWs, the nice house, but it wasn't enough for me, I wanted to do more." Rural America faces a shortage of doctors, with many residents forgoing care and saying locations are too far away. "So I felt like I should do something about that. And it was back to the idea: If not me, then who?" he says.

Exactly two months to the day after a fire blazed through the roof and spire of Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, the church celebrated its first Mass on Saturday.

Instead of his traditional miter hat, the archbishop of Paris wore a white, hard hat, along with about 30 others in attendance.

The Mass was closed to the public for security reasons, and those there were mostly clergy and people who work on the site.

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When students pose a threat to themselves or others, educators sometimes need to restrain them or remove them to a separate space. That's supposed to be a last resort, and it's a controversial practice. As we've reported recently, school districts don't always follow state laws or federal reporting requirements.

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Friday News Roundup - Domestic

Jun 14, 2019

On Wednesday, President Donald Trump told ABC News’ George Stephanopoulos that he might accept damaging information from foreigners about political opponents. After Stephanopolous pressed him on whether he would hand this information over to the FBI, the president said, “I think maybe you do both.”

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This week, Susan Codone traveled to the annual meeting of the Southern Baptist Convention. She went there to share something that happened to her when she was a teenager. It started when she was playing a game of tether ball with her youth minister.

Why Air Ambulance Bills Are Still Sky-High

Jun 14, 2019

In April 2018, 9-year-old Christian Bolling was hiking with his parents and sister in Virginia's Blue Ridge Mountains, near their home in Roanoke. While climbing some boulders, he lost his footing and fell down a rocky 20-foot drop, fracturing both bones in his lower left leg, his wrist, both sides of his nose and his skull.

A rescue squad carried him out of the woods, and a helicopter flew him to a pediatric hospital trauma unit in Roanoke.

Bonnielin Swenor has devoted her life to studying visual impairment in older adults. But for a long time, she didn't often discuss the motivation fueling her work — that she herself has low vision.

Governor J.B. Pritzker signed the most comprehensive abortion law in the land.

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The Southern Baptist Convention meeting in Birmingham, Alabama, follows reporting that shook the faith community. In The Houston Chronicle and San Antonio Express-News, victims described widespread sexual abuse by Southern Baptist clergy and employees.

One key takeaway from their reporting?

Carol Burgos is worried her neighbors think she is bringing the neighborhood down.

She lives in a mobile home park in a woodsy part of Columbia County, N.Y, just off a two-lane highway. The homes have neat yards and American flags. On a spring Saturday, some neighbors are out holding yard sales, with knickknacks spread out on folding tables. Others are out doing yardwork.

Burgos' lawn is unruly and overgrown.

"How bad do I feel when these little old ladies are mowing their lawn and I can't because I'm in so much pain?" she says.

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