U.S. Supreme Court

The confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh began Tuesday morning. 

Dick Durbin
Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois

Illinois U.S. Senator Dick Durbin says he has some tough questions for President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee. But he also says he hasn’t made up his mind.

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Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois

Illinois politicians react to President Trump's nominee for the U.S. Supreme Court.

Gov. Bruce Rauner and Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel get into a Twitter fight over the anti-violence protest that brought the inbound Dan Ryan to a halt.

And J.B. Pritzker's campaign runs an ad with claims widely described as false.

Dick Durbin
Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois

Illinois officials are reacting to President Trump’s nomination of federal appellate court Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court.

C-SPAN

A Chicago appellate judge is on President Trump’s short list of Supreme Court nominees. But who is Amy Coney Barrett?

Sam Dunklau / NPR Illinois 91.9 FM

While Illinois Governor Bruce Rauner celebrated the US Supreme Court’s decision in the Janus labor case on Wednesday, his chief opponent on the campaign trail was quick to criticize. J.B. Pritzker took to the podium in Springfield to do just that.


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Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois

A U.S. Supreme Court ruling this week means shoppers will more often be paying sales taxes for online purchases. It might also have meant a windfall for state government, but Illinois lawmakers anticipated the decision and already spent the money.

U.S. Supreme Court exterior
Brittany Hogan / flickr

A decision from the U.S. Supreme Court Thursday gives more power to states to collect taxes on Internet sales. It could be a boon to Illinois, but not as much as in other states.

Some online sales are about to start costing more.

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Thursday that states can require retailers to collect and remit sales taxes on out-of-state purchases. The 5-to-4 decision reversed decades-old decisions that protected out-of-state vendors from sales tax obligations unless the vendor had a physical presence in the state.

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Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois

This week, Governor Bruce Rauner signed House Bill 40, allowing for the expansion of public funding for abortions.  Also, the U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to revisit Rauner's challenge to public sector union "fair share" fees.  UIS Professor Emeritus Kent Redfield and WTTW's Amanda Vinicky join the panel, which includes Sean Crawford and Daisy Contreras.

Illinois Issues: This State's Abortion Debate

Mar 30, 2017
U.S. Supreme Court exterior
Brittany Hogan / flickr

Bill aims to protect abortion rights on the chance Roe v. Wade  is overturned.

With Democrats in firm control of the Illinois General Assembly, abortion rights might seem to be safe in the state. But what would happen if the U.S. Supreme Court overturned its landmark Roe v. Wade decision, which made abortion legal across the country in 1973?

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Chicago Tonight | WTTW-TV

Full program includes:

  • Is It Really Possible to Balance the State Budget Without a Tax Hike?
  • Chicago’s 7-Cent Bag Tax to Start Feb. 1
  • How Healthy is Illinois’ Job Market?

 

Jeff Bossert

Unions landed a victory Tuesday: A tie at the U-S Supreme Court on a case perceived as do-or-die for public employee unions means current rules will remain in place. But Illinois Governor Bruce Rauner says he'll continue to try to ban so-called "fair share" fees.

The Supreme Court has rejected former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich's appeal of his corruption convictions that included his attempt to sell the vacant Senate seat once occupied by President Barack Obama. 

Dick Durbin
Brian Mackey / WUIS

Republicans in the U.S. Senate have vowed to block any nominee the president might submit to succeed the late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia. But Sen. Dick Durbin of Illinois says there’s more than enough time to consider who should fill the vacancy.

wuis.org

The city of Springfield is asking the U.S. Supreme Court to weigh in on a downtown panhandling ban after it was declared unconstitutional by a federal appeals court. 

Amanda Vinicky / NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

The U.S. Supreme Court will not get the last word on Illinois’ attempts to cut government pension costs; a 2013 pension law is dead, for good. There'd been a slim possibility the law would have another big day in court.

Il. Supreme Court website - state.il.us/court

Illinois may not be done with the 2013 law reducing state employees’ pensions after all. The Attorney General appears to be readying to appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court.

State Week: Countdown To (Fiscal) New Year

Jun 26, 2015
State Week logo (capitol dome)
Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

The week began with a complete budget proposal — albeit billions out of balance — awaiting action by the governor. It ended with a near-total veto. Only money for pre-school, elementary and secondary education was spared the knife. But could that actually worsen the state bidget standoff?

The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, KFF State Health

News Analysis - It’s no secret that many Illinois Democrats have been reluctant to throw their full support behind President Barack Obama’s signature health care law. And Republicans at the state level are not going to get behind a law that their party counterparts in the U.S. House have voted dozens of times to repeal. As a result, those seeking insurance in the state have been handed a mixed bag of policy.

Jamey Dunn
mattpenning.com 2014 / WUIS/Illinois Issues

The U.S. Supreme Court last month issued a decision that opens the door for wealthy donors to give more to candidates, parties and political action committees (PACs). The ruling could have broad implications for the future regulation of campaign spending on the state and federal level. 

Outside the U.S. Supreme Court, Flora Johnson, chairwoman of Executive Board of SEIU Healthcare Illinois & Indiana, in January answers questions about Harris v. Quinn.
SEIU Healthcare Illinois & Indiana

Editor's Note 2/10/2015: Since the original publication of this article, the U.S. Supreme ruled in favor of Pam Harris, who is paid through the Medicaid program to care for her disabled son at home. The opinion categorized some home caregivers as “partial public employees,” whom the court said could not be required to pay dues if they opted not to join a union. The ruling was seen as narrow at the time because it did not overturn the 1977 opinion Abood v.

flickr/borman18

The scandal that brought down former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich led to campaign-contribution caps in Illinois. Advocates of the limits are fearful a case set to be argued before the U.S. Supreme Court Tuesday could upend their efforts.

 The campaign finance law Illinois politicians passed in 2009 restricts how much cash companies, unions and people can give to individual candidates. Theoretically, you can give that maximum contribution to every state candidate in Illinois.

UIS

UIS Associate Professor Jason Pierceson is the author of “Same Sex Marriage in the U.S.:The Road to the Supreme Court.”  The book recounts how the issue has evolved as we await opinions on two key cases.

Justice John Paul Stevens
WUIS/Illinois Issues

Stevens’ friends say he doesn’t agree that he has become more liberal, believing instead that the philosophical makeup of the court has become more conservative. Many believe both shifts happened. 

When retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens wanted to go swimming during a recent trip to Hawaii, many warned him against the idea because of the ocean’s strong undertow.

Stevens, now 90 years old, encountered resistance from locals, as well as Navy SEAL trainers on the beach. But the Chicago native, who is a strong swimmer, was determined.

Peggy Boyer Long
WUIS/Illinois Issues

As early as 1932, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis argued states are potential policy innovators. His evocative phrase, "laboratories of democracy," gained instant and durable fame. But these days, there's a more pertinent maxim for the challenges states face: "Necessity is the mother of invention."

When he was stopped on the shoulder of I-80 in LaSalle County seven years ago, Roy Caballes was no different from thousands of drivers pulled over for speeding every year. Caballes, caught driving 71 mph in a 65-mph zone, was about to get off with a written warning. 

But what happened next transformed Caballes into the central character in an ongoing legal saga that could shape the rights of Illinois citizens, alter state judges' relationship with their federal counterparts and restrict Illinois police from using controversial tools to do their jobs.