civil rights

Rachel Otwell

Earlier this month, Diane Nash told a full auditorium of University of Illinois Springfield students that she and fellow civil rights activists, “Loved you before we met you.” She said efforts to make the U.S. a more equitable place had been done, and are still being done, “For generations yet unborn.” And she urged others to join the cause, or risk sliding into what she sees as an increasingly authoritarian state.

Amanda Vinicky
Chicago Tonight | WTTW-TV

Full program includes:

U.S. Department of Justice press conference
Chicago Tonight | WTTW-TV

Full show including:

  • DOJ Finds Civil Rights Abuses in Chicago Police Department
  • As City Prepares to Borrow $1.2B, Mayor Asks Moody’s to Withdraw Ratings
  • Kurt Vonnegut Artwork Finds New Home at Chicago Veterans Museum

The Phoenix Center

The state has some of the most aggressive protections for transgender people in the country, but the issue still generates controversy here.

Illinois, with its expansive decade-old anti-discrimination law, is one of the most progressive states in the country when it comes to transgender rights, but even in this state there has been a noisy response to rapidly evolving national and local policies on the issue.

  There was something about the handwriting spelling out her address that caused Letitia Dewith-Anderson to lay the envelope aside when it arrived on Tuesday. When she finally opened it Wednesday night, and found a flyer featuring a swastika, “white power” slogans and an application to join the American Nazi Party. 

Brian Mackey speaks with Illinois Issues reporter Rhonda Gillespie about her trip to Selma, Alabama, for the 50th anniversary of Bloody Sunday.